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Cottontop Tamarin

Cotton-top Tamarin, Perth ZooCottontop Tamarin at the Louisville ZooCottontop TamarinCottontop Tamarin (Saguinus oedipus) in Zoo DuisburgCottontop tamarin, Singapore ZooCotton-top Tamarins (Saguinus oedipus). Bronx Zoo, New York City
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Cottontop Tamarin Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Primates
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Callitrichidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Saguinus
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Saguinus Oedipus
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size (L):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
18cm - 30cm (7in - 12in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
220g - 900g (7.7oz - 32oz)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
40km/h (24mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
8 - 15 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Troop
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Critically Endangered
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Black, White, Brown, Tan
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Fur
Favourite Food:Fruit
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Lowland tropical forest
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
2
Main Prey:Fruit, Insects, Rodents
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Hawks, Snakes, Wild Cats
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Small body size and long, thin tail

Cottontop Tamarin Location

Map of Cottontop Tamarin Locations
Map of South America

Cottontop Tamarin

The Cottontop tamarin is a small species of monkey found in the forests of South America. The Cottontop tamarin was named because of it's elegant white fur that flows over it's head and shoulders.

The cottontop tamarin is found in tropical forest edges and secondary forests from Costa Rica to north western Columbia where the cottontop tamarin spends the majority of it's life in the trees.

Cottontop tamarins are among the smallest of the primates with a body length of 17 cm and tail length of 25 cm. The forelimbs of the cottontop tamarin are shorter than the hind limbs, and unlike other monkeys the thumb of the cottontop tamarin is not opposable and it does not have a prehensile tail.

The cottontop tamarin is a diurnal primate which means that the cottontop tamarin is most active during the day and rests in the safety of the tree tops during the night. cottontop tamarins are very sociable animals and inhabit their territory with their rest of the cottontop tamarin troop which generally have between 2 and 14 members. Cottontop tamarin troops are led by the eldest female and have predominantly male members.

The cottontop tamarin is an omnivorous animal meaning that the cottontop tamarin hunts both plants and other animals in order to survive. Fruits, insects and green plants make up the majority of the cottontop tamarin's diet along with small rodents and reptiles, eggs and tree sap.

Due to the relatively small size of the cottontop tamarin, it has a number of predators within it's natural environment. Wild cats, dogs, snakes and birds of prey are primary predators of the cottontop tamarin, along with humans who are destroying their natural habitat.

The cottontop tamarin usually breeds between the months of April and July, when the female cottontop tamarin will give birth to twins (or a single infant) after a four to five month gestation period. The male cottontop tamarins carry and groom infants more than the females do, but females clean the infant more than the males do. Older siblings are also known to contribute to infant care, although infants prefer to be carried by their parents than by their siblings. Infant cottontop tamarins become mobile at 2 to 5 weeks, and begin eating solid food at 4 to 7 weeks. They are independent at 10 to 18 weeks and are fully weaned at 15 to 25 weeks. Sexual maturity is attained at about 2 years of age.

Today, the cottontop tamarin is considered to be a critically endangered species with an estimated wild cottontop tamarin population of just 6,000. The main reason for the severe decline in the cottontop tamarin population is that they have lost more than 75% of their natural habitat to deforestation.

Cottontop Tamarin Translations

Català
Saguinus oedipus
Cesky
Tamarín pinčí
Deutsch
Lisztaffe
English
Cottontop Tamarin
Esperanto
Longharverta tamarino
Español
Saguinus oedipus
Suomi
Valkotöyhtötamariini
Français
Pinché à crête blanche
עִבְרִית
טמרין ראש כותנה
Magyar
Gyapjasfejű tamarin
Italiano
Saguinus oedipus
Nederlands
Pinchéaapje
Norsk
Bomullstopptamarin
Polski
Tamaryna białoczuba
Svenska
Bomullshuvudtamarin
中文
絨頂檉柳猴

Cottontop Tamarin Comments

Zanarra
"Cotton top tamirins are so cute!"
violet
"Great facts"
The Times
"Ah, how great is nature comparing to other artificiality that humans made..."
Bananasss
"great article"
applesauce
"this is the most amazing animal ever!!!!!!!"
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First Published: 5th July 2010, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 05 Jul 2010]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 05 Jul 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 05 Jul 2010]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 05 Jul 2010]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 05 Jul 2010]

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