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Dugong

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Dugong Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Sirenia
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Dugongidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Dugong
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Dugong Dugon
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Herbivore
Size (L):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
2.7m - 3m (8.9ft - 9.8ft)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
150kg - 400kg (330lbs - 880lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
22km/h (13mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
50 - 70 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Threatened
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Brown, Grey
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Leather
Favourite Food:Sea Grass
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Warmer tropical waters and sea grass forests
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
1
Main Prey:Sea Grass. Algae, Flowers
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Sharks, Crocodile
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Large body size and forked tail

Dugong Location

Map of Dugong Locations

Dugong

The dugong is a large marine mammal found in the warm waters surrounding Indonesia and Australia. Although the dugong can be found widely throughout the Indo-Pacific tropics, the highest population of the dugong is concentrated around northern Australia.

Although the dugong looks extremely similar to a manatee, the two are different species. The dugong and the manatee are very closely related and can look almost identical until you look at their tail. The tail of the dugong is typically forked like the tail of a shark, where the tail of the manatee is broad and flat, and slightly more flipper looking than fin looking.

Dugongs are smaller than manatees with the average adult dugong reaching lengths of around 3 meters and weigh nearly 400 kg, which is about the same as a large cow. The front flippers of the dugong can be as much as half a meter in length.

It is thought the legends of mermaids may have originated when sailors from a distance glimpsed dugongs swimming in the water, and mistook them for half-human half-fish creatures. These mermaid legends are also said to be true of the dugongs larger cousin, the manatee.

Dugongs inhabit the warm shallow waters, and despite their large size, dugongs are strictly herbivorous animals and have been referred to as the cows of the sea. Dugongs graze on sea grasses and aquatic plants that grow in abundance in the tropical shallows. Dugongs eat large amounts of sea plants and often leave feeding trails behind of bare sand and uprooted sea grass.

Female dugongs give birth to just one calf about once every five years. The baby dugong is born underwater in the warm shallows, where the baby dugong is immediately able to swim to the surface in order to take its first breath. When the baby dugong is born, the dugong calf is about a meter in length and weighs about 20 kg. The dugong calf will stay close to its mother until the baby dugong is about 2 years old.

Dugong populations are constantly decreasing, with many dugongs being accidental victims in large commercial fishing. Dugongs are now considered to be vulnerable animals but the dugong will commonly get older than 70 years of age. Dugong calves will not reach their full size until they are about 15 years old.

Dugong Translations

Català
Dugong
Dansk
Dygong
Deutsch
Dugong
English
Dugong
Esperanto
Dugongo
Español
Dugong dugon
Suomi
Dugongi
Français
Dugong
עִבְרִית
תחש המשכן
Magyar
Dugong
Italiano
Dugong dugon
日本語
ジュゴン
Latina
Dugon
bil-Malti
Dugongu
Nederlands
Doejong
Norsk
Dugong
Polski
Diugoń
Português
Dugongo
Svenska
Dugonger
Türkçe
Dugong
Tiếng Việt
Bò biển
中文
儒艮

Dugong Comments

emily
"its a great app"
Shay SHAY shay
"loved it amazing and so harmless creatures! Ocean is sure a beautiful thing!"
Anonymous
"Not very helpful I want to know the physical adaptation and the behavioural adaptation"
bonnie
"i loved it ! it was so helpful thank you soooooo much"
jj
"you don't have enery interesting facts or life cycle so it was helpful but not fully helpful"
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First Published: 13th May 2009, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 13 May 2009]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 13 May 2009]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 13 May 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 13 May 2009]

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