To listen to this article, please select Control + Shift + Z to launch the pop-up player.

Browser out-of-date!

You are using an out-of-date web browser, to avoid problems when using A-Z Animals and other sites we strongly recommend you upgrade to the latest version of your web browser!
Get Firefox Get Google Chrome Get Opera Get Microsoft Internet Explorer Get Apple Safari
Remove Advertising
A-Z Animals - Animal Facts, Images and Resources A-Z Animals - Animal Facts, Images and Resources A-Z Animals - Animal Facts, Images and Resources

Animals >>

Newt


 Add to Phobia Filter  Contribute  Print  Listen
Hong Kong Newt (Paramesotriton hongkongensis)
Red bellied newt (Taricha torosa)
Two Chinese Fire Bellied Newts (Cynops orientalis)
Smooth newt (Triturus vulgaris)
Alpine Newt (Triturus alpestris)
The newt is a small amphibian and the average newt only tends to grows to around 15cm long, some newts however are bigger or smaller depending on the species of newt. The newt is found naturally in North America, Europe and Asia and the newt is thought to be a subspecies of the salamander.

A newt tends to lay its eggs individually, with the newt normally finding ponds or slow-moving streams in which to do this. The individual newt eggs attach themselves to aquatic plants and hatch in about 3 weeks. The main difference between newt eggs and frog or toad eggs is that the eggs of the newt are laid individually and are attached to plants. Frog and toad eggs float close to the surface of the water and are usually found in big clumps, where there are often hundreds of eggs together.

The newt tadpoles have a slight resemblance to baby fish, other than the fact that they have feathered external gills. The baby newt will grow legs during the first few months, at which time, the baby newt will be able to explore both water and land.

The newt is generally a solitary animal but some species of newt are known to hibernate in groups. Newts generally come together during the mating season which tends to take place in early spring.

People commonly keep fire-bellied newts, paddle-tail newts and crocodile newts as pets. The newt is seen as a good pet to keep as the newt is small and quiet and some species of newt, like the great crested newt native to Europe can get to 27 years old.

There are thought to be around 15 different species of newt found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, and many of these newt species contain toxins in their skin which helps the newt to defend itself from predators. Certain species of the Pacific newt, found in North America are particularly toxic, with some of these newts containing enough toxin in there skin to kill and adult human.

Newts are known best for their lizard-shaped body, with four legs and a long tail. Not only do newts have the incredible ability to breath both underwater and on land, but newts are also able to regrow limbs, should the original limbs of the newt become damaged. One theory as to why is this happens is that the chemicals that allow newts to regrow limbs, are the same as chemicals that produce tumors in other animals. These fast growing, and reproducing cells are thought to be very similar in both newts and tumors in other animals.

Due to loss of habitat and pollution, the newt populations throughout the world have been severely declining. Conservation effects in both the UK and the USA have led to the native newt populations being allowed to try and increase in number once again.


Newt Comments (16)

lizzy pie

"a newt is one small reptile and if u have two one can eat t he other and they can live more then 30 years "

Anonymous

"I like it because i found stuff the secound I got on"

patrick

"this website is great my homework was easy thanks tothis place"

Showing 3 of 16 comments.

Show More Comments

Post Comment

Your Name:

Article Rating:

Your Comment:


Article Tools

Print Article
View printer friendly version of Newt article.
 
Listen to Article
Listen to audio version of Newt article. Hot key: CTRL key + Shift key + Z key

Newt Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things...
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom...
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum...
Lissamphibia
Order:
A group of animals within a class...
Caudata
Family:
A group of animals within an order...
Salamandridae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family...
Pleurodelinae
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species...
Lissotriton Vulgaris
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to...
Amphibian
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats...
Omnivore
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is...
5-15cm (1.7-5.9in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is...
10-50g (0.3-1.8oz)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal...
42km/h (30mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for...
2-15 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable...
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct...
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings...
Black, Brown, Grey, Green, Orange, Red, Yellow
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal...
Scales
Favourite Food:Worms
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives...
Temperate forests and river banks
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once...
100
Main Prey:
The food that the animal gains energy from...
Worms, Insects, Water snails
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal...
Birds, Fox, Reptiles
Special Features:Permeable, toxic skin and feathery gills

Related Animals

African Clawed FrogAfrican Clawed Frog
A particularly ferocious amphibian!
FrogFrog
There are around 5,000 different species!
Horned FrogHorned Frog
Natively found in South America!
LizardLizard
There are around 5,000 different species!
SalamanderSalamander
There are more than 700 different species!
Spadefoot ToadSpadefoot Toad
They spend most of their time underground!
AxolotlAxolotl
Found only in one complex of lakes!