To listen to this article, please select Control + Shift + Z to launch the pop-up player.

Browser out-of-date!

You are using an out-of-date web browser, to avoid problems when using A-Z Animals and other sites we strongly recommend you upgrade to the latest version of your web browser!
Get Firefox Get Google Chrome Get Opera Get Microsoft Internet Explorer Get Apple Safari
Remove Advertising
A-Z Animals - Animal Facts, Images and Resources A-Z Animals - Animal Facts, Images and Resources A-Z Animals - Animal Facts, Images and Resources

Animals >>

Raccoon


 Add to Phobia Filter  Contribute  Print  Listen
Raccoon
Raccoon
Raccoon
Raccoon
Raccoon
The raccoon is a medium sized bear-like mammal that was originally only found in North America. Due to the deliberate introduction of the raccoon into other countries, the common raccoon can also be found now in Europe and Japan.

The average raccoon is around 70 cm from the raccoons nose to the tip of the raccoons tail. A fully grown raccoon can weigh up to 10kg and can live for up to 20 years in captivity. Raccoons in the wild however, tend to have a much lower life expectancy.

The raccoon originally inhabited densely wooded areas and large forests but today the raccoon has adapted to living in mountainous and wetter habitats. The raccoon has also moved closer to human communities as the raccoons are able to find food very easily but many homeowners consider them to be pests.

Raccoons are grey, omnivorous animals surviving on a diet consisting of insects, plants and small animals such as fish and the occasional bird. Raccoons tend to be nocturnal but it is not uncommon to spot a raccoon during the day.

The most distinctive feature of the raccoon is the black mask found around the eyes of the raccoon. The raccoon has a thick layer of fur which keeps it warm during the cold winters and raccoons also have extremely sensitive and and dexterous front paws with raccoons having been observed turning door knobs and opening jars.

Raccoons forage for their food and raccoons are often found close to water. Raccoons have been observed washing their food in water before consuming it! Although the reasons for this behaviour are not really known, it is thought that the sense of touch of the front paws of the raccoon is heightened when wet.

Their are around ten different species of raccoon that range in size but differ little in appearance, found throughout the Americas. The sense of touch is the most important for a raccoon and their agile front paws are covered in a spiny coating to protect them when they are not being used to aid eating.

Raccoons tend to mate in the late winter to early spring from January to March. However, more southernly raccoon species have been known to mate later with the mating season often lasting until June. After a gestation period of around 2 months, the female raccoon will give birth to roughly 5 baby raccoons, also known as kits or cubs.

The raccoon kits are born blind and deaf, with both senses appearing with the first month. Baby raccoons are not born hairless but instead have a layer of light coloured fur, with the distinctive black mask being visible from birth. Raccoon kits are normally about 10 cm long at birth and weigh around 75 g.

Raccoon Foot Facts

  • Raccoons have four feet with five toes both their front hind feet which give the raccoon more stability when running and climbing.
  • The underneath of the feet of the raccoon are bare-soled and flat which makes the raccoon waddle rather than walk.
  • The front feet if the raccoon are similar to the hands of a human in both appearance and dexterity to allow to the raccoon to easily hold onto things.
  • The larger back feet of the raccoon give the raccoon more power when running and balance when the front feet of the raccoon are in use.
  • Raccoons have very nimble fingers on their front feet that enable them to untie knots, turn doorknobs and even open jars.

Raccoon Teeth Facts

  • Raccoons have 40 teeth including four long and sharp canine teeth at the front of the mouth of the raccoon.
  • Raccoons use their front hand-like feet to hold onto their food before using their teeth to chew it up and swallow it.
  • The sharp canines in the front of the mouth of the raccoon are followed by the premolars which increase in size as they go into the mouth of the raccoon.
  • The raccoon uses its molars and premolars to grind up and chewing their food until they are able to swallow it.
  • Raccoons are known for their unique habit of washing their food when they are close to water, however raccoons will not pass up a tasty treat if there is no water around to wash it in.

Raccoon Comments (8)

xiaver

"raccoons are my favorite animal. its so cute.I wish I could have one,"

Larry Cameron

"Raccoons don't do wash their food, although ititappears like they do. What they are actually doing is using the tiny hairs that grow near their nails. This is a defense mechanism. If they looked down while they were at the watering hole they were become easy prey, so they use those little hairs like catfish whiskers,that way they can find their food without having to look down. "

Erich

"I theorize that the washing of food in water is a survival trait, the first raccoons who washed parasite eggs off of their hands and food lived longer. "

Showing 3 of 8 comments.

Show More Comments

Post Comment

Your Name:

Article Rating:

Your Comment:


Article Tools

Print Article
View printer friendly version of Raccoon article.
 
Listen to Article
Listen to audio version of Raccoon article. Hot key: CTRL key + Shift key + Z key

Raccoon Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things...
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom...
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum...
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class...
Carnivora
Family:
A group of animals within an order...
Procyonidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family...
Procyon
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species...
Procyon Lotor
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to...
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats...
Omnivore
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is...
41-71cm (16-28in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is...
3.5-9kg (7.7-19.8lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal...
24km/h (15mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for...
12-16 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable...
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct...
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings...
Grey, Black, White, Brown
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal...
Fur
Favourite Food:Fish
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives...
Woodland areas close to water
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once...
5
Main Prey:
The food that the animal gains energy from...
Fish, Nuts, Berries, Corn
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal...
Bobcat, Foxes, Wolves, Mountain Lions
Special Features:Black mask on face and dexterous hands and feet

Related Animals

BinturongBinturong
Also known as the Asian Bearcat!
CoatiCoati
Found in dense forests and wet jungles!
BeaverBeaver
Builds a dam from sticks and leaves!
Red PandaRed Panda
There are less than 3,000 left in the wild!