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Betty the Butterfly's Blog >>

Discovering Indigenous Tribes


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Copyright Survival
International


Despite the almost complete connection we now have with all parts of the world, there are still people out there who have no idea about the modern technologies that now control most of our lives. These are people who are still very connected to the environment that surrounds them and are completely self sufficient from the outside world.

There are numerous indigenous tribes around the world, but many of those that have yet to come into contact with others, are often found in the depths of the jungles across the tropical southern hemisphere and are only known to us from aerial photographs. One of the most recently discovered was an isolated tribe inhabiting an area of rainforest on the border between Brazil and Peru.


Copyright Survival
International

The first pictures of the tribe were released two years ago when a number of observations were also made. The people cover themselves in a red paint known as urucum, which is made from native annatto seeds, and is also a natural colouring for materials such as baskets. They grow all of their vegetables in communal gardens and are said to have been in seemingly good health.


Rubber Collection
The biggest indication that these local tribes-people have not come into contact with mainstream civilisation is their lack of technologies, along with the fact that they have not been affected by diseases from us that they are not immune too. However, they were observed using steel machetes which are thought to have been traded from other forest tribes.

One of the biggest concerns though to Survival International who have been conducting the research, is that these people are being more affected by illegal logging every year in their native environment. The tribe is thought to have descended from the indigenous Rubber tree farmers that helped to fuel the world with rubber about 100 years ago.


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