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Jack Russel

Jack Russel
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Jack Russel Facts

Common Name:
Most widely used name for this species
Jack Russel
Origin:
The area where the animal first came from
Germany
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
25cm (10in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
4kg (8lbs)
Lifespan:
How long the animal lives for
16 years
Group:
The domestic group such as cat or dog
Terrier

Jack Russel Location

Map of Jack Russel Locations
Map of Europe

Jack Russel

Jack Russells are first and foremost a working terrier. Originally bred to bolt fox from their dens during hunts, they are used on numerous ground-dwelling quarry such as groundhog, badger, and red and grey fox.

The working Jack Russel Terrier is required to locate quarry in the earth, and then either bolt or hold it in place until they are dug to. To accomplish this the dog must bark and work the quarry continuously.

Because the preservation of this working ability is of the highest importance to most registered breeders, Jack Russells tend to be extremely intelligent, athletic, fearless, and vocal dogs.

It is not uncommon for these dogs to become moody or destructive if they are not properly stimulated and exercised as they have a tendency to bore easily and will often create their own fun when left alone to entertain themselves.

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Note, this article is flagged as incomplete and is scheduled to be updated.

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First Published: 11th November 2008, Last Updated: 8th November 2019

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 11 Nov 2008]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 11 Nov 2008]
4. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
5. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 11 Nov 2008]