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Millipede

Millipede (Diplopoda)A millipede crawling on a tree.A millipede on a tree.Millipede (Diplopoda)Millipede (Diplopoda)A west Texas millipede on stones.Millipede (Diplopoda)A millipede curled up on a leaf.Millipede (Diplopoda)
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Millipede Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Arthropoda
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Myriapoda
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Diplopoda
Common Name:
Most widely used name for the species
Millipede
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Diplopoda
Found:Worldwide
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
1.5-38cm (0.5-15in)
Number of Species:
The total number of recorded species
10,000
Average Lifespan:7 years
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Red, Black, Yellow, Orange, Brown
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Shell
Favourite Food:Decaying plant material
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Moist micro-habitats
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
500
Main Prey:Decaying plant material, Plants, Insects
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Birds, Badgers, Rodents
Special Features:Segmented body and many legs

Millipede Location

Map of Millipede Locations

Millipede

The millipede is a medium to large sized invertebrate that is found under rocks and in decaying logs all around the world. The millipede has a long and narrow body which is made up of segments.

The millipede is from the same family as the centipede, but the millipede generally has more legs for its body length than the centipede. The average millipede has between 80 and 400 legs, not a thousand as the name suggests.

The millipede is found all over the world but is more common in the southern hemisphere where the millipede has been known to get to nearly 40cm long. Some species of millipede have a poisonous bite which they use to kill their prey before eating it.

Millipedes are most commonly found in the cooler, damper and darker places within their environment. Millipedes inhabit areas under rocks, in the leaf litter, in rotting logs and occasionally in burrows which are all known as micro-habitats.

The exact number of legs and segments that make up the body of the millipede, depend on the millipede species. However, all millipedes are made up in a similar way with the first sections of the millipede's body having one pair of legs and the later sections of two pairs of legs. The legs of millipede all work together and move in a wave-like motion.

The millipede is an omnivorous animal but primarily feeds on dead plant material and decaying matter on the forest floor. Millipedes are also known to eat some species of plants (that are alive) and the larger species of millipede also hunt insects.

The millipede has a number of different predators in its natural environment including birds, badgers, foxes and small rodents such as shrews and rats. When the millipede feels that it is in danger it curls up into a spiral and some species of millipede even release a disgusting smelling liquid that deters many of the animals that prey on the millipede.

The female millipede can lay up to 1,000 sticky eggs at once although the number of millipede eggs laid is usually closer to 500. When the baby millipedes hatch they only have 3 pairs of legs but they shed their skin as they grow. Each time the baby millipedes shed their skin they develop more body segments and legs.

Millipede Comments

Ms Glynn's 4th Grade Class
"Our class thinks this topic is interesting (and also creepy) to learn about."
bug catcher jack
"man i love this website these pictures are very interesting! thnx"
Anonymous
"millipeds are creppy but intresting"
coolflash
"I LOVE THEM I ACTUALLY FELT ONE BEFORE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! #CUTEnLOVELY"
hello my name is NO!
"i love to see them in real life and how thay feel"
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First Published: 14th November 2008, Last Updated: 13th February 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 14 Nov 2008]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 14 Nov 2008]
4. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
5. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 14 Nov 2008]

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