10 Of The Most Beautiful Waterfalls in Georgia

Written by Volia Nikaci
Published: April 22, 2022
Image Credit Sean Pavone/Shutterstock.com
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In Georgia, waterfalls can be observed in numerous state parks that include designated pathways, steps, handrails, and signage, showcasing their natural beauty. Even those who are afraid of the outdoors may find that Georgia’s waterfalls entice them to venture off the beaten track and into the wild, picture-perfect surroundings. The terrain and experience of each waterfall differ, which means you’ll want to go see the best ones.

At A-Z Animals, we know everything about the best waterfalls to view while in Georgia. Let’s have a look at ten of the most magnificent waterfalls in Georgia that you should absolutely visit as soon as possible!

1. Jacks River Falls

Jacks River Falls
The Jacks River Falls is one of the most popular attractions in the Cohutta Wilderness.

iStock.com/Chris Wilson

Jacks River Falls
Located In:Epworth, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:The Cohutta Wilderness
Animals to See:Black bears, Wild boars 

The Jacks Water Falls can be found in the Cohutta Wilderness, where the river pours over a rocky ledge. Jacks River Falls is breathtaking, and it is certainly one of the most stunning waterfalls in Georgia. It’s also a popular hiking spot in Georgia and is one of Georgia’s most secluded waterfalls – making it the perfect spot to escape the hustle and bustle of life.

2. Amicalola Falls

Amicalola Falls, Georgia
The name Amicalola comes from the Cherokee language and roughly translates to “Tumbling Water.”

Sean Pavone/Shutterstock.com

Amicalola Falls
Located In:Dawsonville, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:Amicalola Falls State Park & Lodge
Animals to See:Vultures, Deer

Amicalola Falls, at 729 feet and seven cascades, is the largest waterfall in Georgia and the third tallest cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi River. We highly recommend everyone to make it a point to stop by this amazing site while in Georgia. Spend the day exploring the trails surrounding the waterfalls, which range from short walks to an eight-mile trail to Springer Mountain.

3. DeSoto Falls

DeSoto Falls
The DeSoto Falls is named after Hernando DeSoto, a Spanish explorer who traveled through Georgia around 1540.

James Deitsch/Shutterstock.com

DeSoto Falls
Located In:Lumpkin County, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:DeSoto State Park
Animals to See:Cottontail rabbits, Cardinals

The DeSoto Falls of Georgia is located along Frogtown Creek in Lumpkin County, Georgia. Upper DeSoto Falls, Middle Desoto Falls, and Lower DeSoto Falls are the names of three waterfalls on Frogtown Creek. The two-mile moderate trail leads to the falls, and it is a beautiful sight in the Chattahoochee National Forest with easy access for camping weekends.

4. Cherokee Falls

Cherokee Falls
Cherokee Falls was once a formerly unnamed waterfall in Georgia and only earned its name during a contest.

Gabriel Quiles/Shutterstock.com

Cherokee Falls
Located In:Dade County, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:Cloudland Canyon State Park
Animals to See:Red Tail hawks, Bats

Cherokee Falls is a waterfall in Dade County, Georgia, located in Cloudland Canyon State Park. The trail to Cherokee Falls is fairly difficult. The trail descends to the canyon, where two waterfalls, Cherokee Falls and Hemlock Falls, can be found. So although the hike isn’t easy, you do get two waterfalls for the price of one hike! 

5. Caledonia Cascade

Caledonia Cascade
Caledonia Cascade may be seen best from the hiking trail that circles the rim of Tallulah Gorge.

Jsfouche / Creative Commons – License

Caledonia Cascade
Located In:Rabun County, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:Tallulah Gorge State Park
Animals to See:Green salamander, Racoons

Caledonia Cascade, sometimes known as Cascade Falls, is a 600-foot waterfall in Rabun County, Georgia, near Tallulah Falls. Caledonia Cascade is sometimes referred to as the second-tallest waterfall in Georgia. However, it is actually a succession of smaller waterfalls and cascades. This three-tiered waterfall has three drops, the longest of which is 262 feet long (80 m). You can stop at the Wallenda tower on your way to the falls. In 1970, the tower served as an anchor point for crossing the Tallulah Gorge.

6. Raven Cliff Falls

Raven Cliff Falls
Dodd Creek, a small mountain stream, creates what we know today as Raven Cliff Falls.

D Griffin/Shutterstock.com

Raven Cliff Falls
Located In:Helen, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:Chattahoochee National Forest
Animals to See:Bobcat, Weasel

Raven Cliff Falls is one of four notable waterfalls near Helen, Georgia. It is one of the most remarkable waterfalls in Georgia because the water rushes through a crack in the face of a solid rock outcropping to the ground 100 feet below. The Raven Cliffs Trail, which follows Dodd Creek to the falls, leads to Raven Cliff Falls. Although the trail is approximately a 5-mile round trip, it is relatively easy to hike until near the end.

7. Minnehaha Falls

Minnehaha Falls
Minnehaha Falls, at 100 feet, is said to be one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Rabun County.

Sean Pavone/Shutterstock.com

Minnehaha Falls
Located In:Lakemont, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:Angel Falls Trail
Animals to See:Squirrels, River otters

Minnehaha Falls cascades over a cliff in a beautiful multi-tiered cascade before continuing downstream to the coast of Lake Rabun. It is one of North Georgia’s most popular waterfalls, located along the banks of Lake Rabun. Minnehaha Falls is a popular hike among Georgia residents due to its short length. The waterfall gets its unusual name from the Dakota Native American term meaning ‘waterfall.’

8. Anna Ruby Falls

Anna Ruby Falls
Anna Ruby Falls is located in North Georgia’s Blue Ridge Mountains, which were formed roughly 300 million years ago.

Sean Pavone/Shutterstock.com

Anna Ruby Falls
Located In:Helen, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:Unicoi State Park
Animals to See:Wild turkeys, White-tailed deer 

Anna Ruby Falls is in White County, in Helen, Georgia, near Unicoi State Park. Two creeks cascade over the drop-offs to form the waterfall. Curtis Creek, at 153 feet, is one creek, while York Creek Falls, at 50 feet, is the other. The trailhead is accessible for a modest fee of $3.00 per person.

9. Ada-Hi Falls

Ada-Hi Falls
The name of the Ada-Hi Falls is Cherokee for “forest.”

Jsfouche / Creative Commons – License

Ada-Hi Falls
Located In:Clayton, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:Black Rock Mountain State Park
Animals to See:Eastern Black Bear, Foxes

Ada-Hi Falls is the highest elevation waterfall in Georgia. It’s an interesting place to visit, and the observation deck is ideal for taking photos if you’re looking for a scenic background. Despite the fact that the hike is short and attractive, the water is only a trickle during the dry months. It’s best to go throughout the months of March-November. 

10. Sea Creek Falls

Sea Creek Falls
Located In:Suches, Georgia
Nearby Attractions:Crooked River State Park
Animals to See:Tortoises, Gophers

Sea Creek Falls in Georgia is in the little town of Suches and is a short but amazingly beautiful hike. Hikers of all abilities will enjoy this walk which is 0.5 miles both ways and features a nice swimming hole. During the winter and spring, there is a greater flow of water, creating a magnificent scene. In addition to the steep fall, there are also cascades, which descend in a transient fashion.

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About the Author

Volia Nikaci is a copywriter and content editor with a passion and expertise in SEO content creation, branding, and marketing. She has a background in Broadcast Journalism & Political Science from CUNY Brooklyn College.

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