Best Type of Newfoundland Dog With Pictures

Written by Chanel Coetzee
Published: December 28, 2022
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If you love Newfoundlands, you might also be interested in the best types of Newfoundland mixes. Mixing these massive dogs with another impressive breed often results in a healthier version of this gentle giant. However, their thick coats make these crossbreeds heavy shedders, so they might not be the best choice if you suffer from allergies. Nevertheless, Newfoundlands are in high demand and fall into the American Kennel Club’s 50 most popular dog breeds in the world!

Newfies, as they are fondly named, were initially bred to haul carts, and they frequently used to pull fisherman’s nets from the ocean. In addition, these powerful dogs would cart wood up and down the hills of Newfoundland.

One type of Newfoundland is called the Landseer. The name variation is because these dogs only come in black and white.

Because they are so big, they have shorter lifespans compared to other breeds. Unfortunately, this is due to common health issues like stenosis, hip dysplasia, and elbow issues. However, by crossbreeding this gigantic breed, you can weed out some of the health conditions that plague them. So, without further ado, here are the best types of Newfoundlands.

New Rottland (Newfoundland and Rottweiler Mix)

Another name for this mix is Newfweiler, and it’s a spectacular specimen. However, if you want to own one of these gigantic dogs, you will need a massive yard. While the New Rottland is a Rottweiler cross, they are not aggressive. In fact, they make wonderful family pets and will protect your children with their lives. But, because they can weigh up to 150 pounds, they can easily knock over a small child accidentally, so they should always be supervised when around kids.

New Rottland smiling

The New Rottland makes a great family pet and guard dog.

©SantanaLynnStephens/Shutterstock.com

Newfie Husky (Newfoundland and Husky Mix)

If you thought the Newfoundland was stunning, the Newfie husky is spectacular! They are absolutely breathtaking, especially if they inherit the husky’s eyes. However, while these mixes are beautiful, it can be challenging to maintain their thick coats. Owners must brush their long fur daily to avoid matting and keep the shedding at bay.

Swiss Newfie (Newfoundland and Swiss Mountain Dog Mix)

When crossbreeding a Newfoundland and a Swiss mountain dog, the result is a Swiss Newfie. These dogs are muscular and have heavy bones. Their bodies are slightly longer than they are tall, and female Swiss Newfies are generally smaller than the males, who usually weigh over 100 pounds. In addition, they have broad flat skulls with blunt muzzles, as both parent breeds have these features.

This mix makes incredibly easy-going companions who enjoy spending time with their humans. In addition, Swiss Newfies have a lot of patience and tolerance, making them great with children. However, because of their size, these gigantic dogs can quickly push a small child over in excitement, so owners must keep an eye on them when they are around kids. Even though these massive dogs are trusting and affectionate, they do need socialization as pups to boost their confidence around strangers. If they are well-trained and socialized, Swiss Newfies make excellent emotional support and therapy dogs due to their sensitive natures.

Saint Bernewfie (Newfoundland and Saint Bernard Mix)

The Saint Bernewfie is also referred to as a Bernefie, and they are massive; just look at their parents! These huge dogs generally have dense, long coats, which are either black, brown, or brindle. In addition, they have large heads with square muzzles and floppy ears. Furthermore, they have a large, muscular build with deep chests. Lastly, Saint Bernewfies weigh between 132 to 154 pounds and measure around 23 to 27 inches tall. Needless to say, they will need a large yard!

While this mix is excellent with children thanks to their gentle and caring nature, their size may be a problem around smaller kids. In addition, they are heavy droolers, so be prepared for slobber on your walls, clothes, bedding, and just about everywhere else!

Saint Bernewfie puppy on a leash

Saint Bernewfies make great family pets.

©Anne Guevara/Shutterstock.com

Golden Newfie (Newfoundland and Golden Retriever Mix)

The golden Newfie is an incredible mix breed resulting from crossbreeding a Newfoundland and a golden retriever. This easy-going mix truly has a love for life and makes a fantastic family pet. Depending on which parent it takes after, they are either a large or gigantic breed. So, owners will need a lot of space to accommodate them.

This dog is incredibly sweet and loving to their family but wary of strangers. Therefore, they need a firm but gentle trainer. In addition, they are very sensitive, so golden Newfies don’t respond well to being told off. Furthermore, they are loyal and intelligent, so there is no need to hire a training expert. Owners just need to put in a little time and effort to socialize them well.

Lastly, whoever purchases or adopts these mixes need to love water, as both parent breeds are obsessed with swimming. Newfoundlands are experts in water rescue, and the golden retriever simply loves the water, so there is a good chance your golden Newfie will save you if you ever drown.

Golden Newfie puppy playing outside in the wood. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Golden Newfies love playing in the water.

New Shep (Newfoundland and German Shepherd Mix)

Combining the Newfoundland and German shepherd creates a friendly and energetic mix called the New shep. These dogs get quite large and usually weigh around 150 pounds. They can vary in color from blue, black, brown, white, sable, silver, or cream. As both parents have a thick, soft undercoat and short or medium-length coarse outer coat, the New shep will vary in color and fur length.

While energetic, this mix is also laidback. Due to their size, they require moderate exercise, like extensive walking. However, letting them frolic around in the water or throwing a ball in the backyard will also work. If cared for properly, these dogs have a relatively long lifespan for a large breed and can live over 10 years of age.

Training the New shep might be challenging because although they are highly intelligent, they can be stubborn.

Bernfie (Newfoundland and Bernese Mountain Dog Mix)

The Bernfie is the result of crossbreeding the Newfoundland and Bernese mountain dog, making one good-looking canine! They are a large mix, measuring between 25 to 29 inches and weighing around 90 to 150 pounds. In addition, they come in a variety of colors, like black, white, and brown.

Bernfies generally have brown eyes, floppy ears, long tails, and long, thick coats. As these dogs have so much fur, they shed throughout the year. However, during the shedding season, their hair loss becomes more intense.

Bernfie in the snow

Bernfies can weigh between 90 to 150 pounds!

©Beatrice Foord-St-Laurent/Shutterstock.com

Aussie Newfie (Newfoundland and Australian Shepherd Mix)

The Australian shepherd and Newfoundland mix is a relatively new hybrid but wildly popular. These stunning dogs are classified as a medium-large breed, weighing between 40 to 70 pounds and measuring around 23 to 27 inches tall.

Aussie Newfies are highly intelligent and have a lot of energy. However, they only need a moderate amount of exercise. They come in an array of colors, including black, white, red, brown, and gray.

New Labralound (Newfoundland and Labrador Mix)

Another name for this Newfoundland and Labrador mix is Newfador. This interesting mix is a large to giant canine with coarse, medium-length fur and a long feathered tail. Due to their massive stature, owners need to ensure this dog is well-trained. However, they have excellent characters thanks to their parent breeds having great temperaments. The New Labralound loves being around people, and their patient natures make them perfect for families with children and other pets. But, unfortunately, they do experience bursts of excitement and might accidentally knock small children over.

Up Next

The photo featured at the top of this post is © iStock.com/volofin

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About the Author

Chanel Coetzee is a writer at A-Z Animals, primarily focusing on big cats, dogs, and travel. Chanel has been writing and researching about animals for over 10 years. She has also worked closely with big cats like lions, cheetahs, leopards, and tigers at a rescue and rehabilitation center in South Africa since 2009. As a resident of Cape Town, South Africa, Chanel enjoys beach walks with her Stafford bull terrier and traveling off the beaten path.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) 

What breeds make a Newfoundland Dog?

A Newfoundland dog is a cross between John’s dog and a European mastiff.

What is the biggest Newfoundland dog?

The biggest Newfoundland on record weighed a whopping 260 pounds!

What is a black and white Newfoundland called?

The black and white Newfoundland is called a Landseer.

Thank you for reading! Have some feedback for us? Contact the AZ Animals editorial team.

Sources
  1. Pet Press, Available here: https://petpress.net/11-newfoundland-mixes-thatll-melt-your-heart/
  2. American Kennel Club (1970) www.akc.org