Boston Ivy vs English Ivy: What Are The Differences?

Written by Hannah Ward

Published: September 16, 2022

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Boston and English ivy are both flowering plants best known for being fast growing and for their ability to climb to extensive heights. Both are vines and readily attach themselves to trees and buildings. On the surface, they look as though they are the same plant, yet when we look closer, we find they are actually very different. So join us if you want to learn all about Boston ivy vs English ivy!

Comparing English Ivy vs Boston Ivy

Boston ivy is native to China, Korea, and Japan, where it prefers shady and semi-shaded woodland areas.

English IvyBoston Ivy
SpeciesHedera helixParthenocissus tricuspidata
Alternative NamesCommon ivy, European ivy, ivyGrape ivy, Japanese ivy, Japanese creeper
OriginEurope, western Asia, northern AfricaChina, Korea, Japan
HabitatWoodland, wasteland, scrublandShady or semi-shaded woodlands
Deciduous or EvergreenEvergreenDeciduous
SizeApprox 80 feet high & 15 feet wideApprox 50 feet high & 10 feet wide
LeavesDark green and glossy, often oval or heart-shaped, light-colored veins, 3 to 5 lobesUniform green with no noticeable veins, heart or oval shaped, usually 3 lobes
FlowersYellowish green dome-shaped clustersSmall, green, and insignificant
FruitBlack & berry-like, grow in clustersDark blue, grape-like, grow in bunches
AggressionCauses significant damage to buildingsIt does not damage buildings as much

The 7 Key Differences Between Boston Ivy and English Ivy

The main difference between Boston ivy and English ivy is that one is evergreen while the other is deciduous.

Additionally, their leaves and berries are slightly different, and their flowers are different of sizes. Not only that, but one is more aggressive than the other.

Boston Ivy vs English Ivy: Origin

English ivy is native to most of Europe, western Asia, and northern

Africa

, inhabiting woodlands, scrubland, and wasteland.

The first difference between English and Boston ivy is their origins. English ivy is native to most of Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, inhabiting woodlands, scrubland, and wasteland. Boston ivy is native to China, Korea, and Japan, where it prefers shady and semi-shaded woodland areas. However, both plants are widespread worldwide and are classed as invasive species in many areas.

Boston Ivy vs English Ivy: Family

Boston ivy is not even a true ivy as it is not a member of the Hedera genus, of which members are true ivies.

Despite sharing the common name “ivy,” Boston and English ivy are not closely related. Boston ivy is a member of the Vitaceae family group known as the grape family, comprised of approximately 910 species. Boston ivy is not even a true ivy as it is not a member of the Hedera genus, of which members are true ivies. English ivy is a member of the Araliaceae family group, which is made up of approximately 1,500 different species that are primarily woody plants. As a member of Hedera, English ivy is a true ivy.

Boston Ivy vs English Ivy: Evergreen or Deciduous

English ivy is an evergreen species which means that its leaves remain green all year round without dying and dropping off in winter.

Another major difference between Boston ivy and English ivy is the color of their leaves. This is because English ivy is an evergreen species, meaning its leaves remain green all year round without dying and dropping off in winter. However, Boston ivy is deciduous rather than evergreen. This means that although its leaves are green during spring and summer, they turn red and drop off during fall. In fact, Boston ivy often looks as though it is dead during the winter months. But as soon as the temperature changes in spring and the days begin to lengthen, it returns to its full glory.

Boston Ivy vs English Ivy: Leaves

During the summer, Boston ivy has uniform green leaves with no noticeable color change over the veins.

As we’ve just mentioned, Boston ivy is deciduous, so its leaves turn red in the fall. However, during the spring and summer months, there are still some other slight differences between the leaves of these two plants. English ivy has glossy dark green leaves with visible light-colored veins. The leaves are usually heart or oval-shaped and have between three and five lobes.

During the summer, Boston ivy has uniform green leaves with no noticeable color change over the veins. Their leaves are also heart or oval-shaped but typically only have three lobes.

Boston Ivy vs English Ivy: Flowers

English ivy has yellowish green flowers which grow in dome-shaped clusters.

The flowers on these two plants are also noticeably different. English ivy has yellowish green flowers which grow in dome-shaped clusters. However, the flowers on Boston ivy are green and so small that they are virtually unnoticeable.

Boston Ivy vs English Ivy: Fruit

The fruit on Boston ivy is a dark blueish color and has a grape-like appearance.

The fruit of Boston and English ivy look similar at first glance, but the fruit of English ivy is black and berry-like and grows in clusters. The fruit on Boston ivy is a dark blueish color and has a grape-like appearance. They grow in bunches, but as the flowers are so insignificant, it can often look as though the fruit has bloomed from nowhere.

Boston Ivy vs English Ivy: Aggression

English ivy is generally considered more aggressive to buildings than Boston ivy.

Both English and Boston ivy can often be found climbing their way up buildings, and in some cases, this can be a good thing as they can be used to cover up unsightly structures. They also provide shade along walls during the summer months, reducing the cooling costs inside the buildings.

However, while they can be useful to buildings, they can also be damaging. Despite this, Boston ivy is generally considered less aggressive to buildings than English ivy. The climbing vines can scar buildings, and as they continue to grow upwards, they can damage guttering and eaves. Additionally, the roots and vines can penetrate any cracks or joints and exacerbate any weakness in the building.

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About the Author

Hannah is a writer at A-Z animals where her primary focus is on reptiles, marine life, mammals, and geography. Hannah has been writing and researching animals for four years alongside running her family farm. A resident of the UK, Hannah loves riding horses and creating short stories.

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