Discover the Largest Bighead Carp Ever Caught in Indiana

Written by Alan Lemus
Updated: May 9, 2023
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Bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) is a species of invasive fish that has been causing concerns among biologists, anglers, and environmentalists in Indiana. 

They’re part of the family Cyprinidae, which includes other popular game fish like carp, minnows, and shiners. Native to East Asia, this species was first brought to the United States in the 1970s to mitigate algae growth in aquaculture ponds. But these fish soon escaped into the Mississippi River system and have since spread to many waterways, including those in Indiana

Their enormous size and voracious appetite have earned them the nickname “river monsters.”

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The presence of bighead carp in Indiana raises many concerns about the potential impact on the state’s native aquatic ecosystems and fishing industry. 

Today, we discover the largest bighead carp ever caught in Indiana and worldwide. We also explore their physical characteristics, diet, history, predators, current status, impact on the ecosystem, efforts to control their populations, and future outlook in Indiana.

The Largest Bighead Carp Ever Caught in Indiana

The largest bighead carp ever caught in Indiana weighed 53 lbs. 8 oz. Angler Duane Stafford caught the carp at the White River, Pike County, in 2000.

The Largest Bighead Carp Ever Caught in the World

The largest bighead carp ever caught worldwide weighed 125 lbs. 5 oz. On July 24, 2021, Missouri bow fisherman Matt Neuling and a friend caught the carp at Lake Perry. Initially, Perry and his friend thought they had shot at a smaller grass carp. They only realized it was a colossal bighead carp when they saw more of the fish. Missouri’s previous bighead carp record was 104 lbs. 15 oz.

Physical Characteristics

Let’s take a look at some of the physical characteristics of bighead carp.

Size and Weight Range

Bighead carp can grow quite large, with males generally smaller than females. The average length of an adult bighead carp is around 3 feet, but they can grow up to 4 feet long. 

The weight of bighead carp varies greatly depending on their age, sex, and feeding habits. Adult bighead carp weigh 30-50 lbs on average, but some can weigh over 100 lbs.

Appearance and Distinguishing Features 

One of the most distinguishing features of bighead carp is their large size. 

They have a long, torpedo-shaped body with a broad, flattened head and a small mouth. Their scales are silver or gray, and they have a white underbelly. 

Bighead carp also have a long dorsal fin stretching along their back and a shorter anal fin closer to their tail. Their eyes are located low on the head, and they have a distinct black dot on their gill cover. 

Overall, bighead carp have a sleek, streamlined appearance that allows them to swim quickly and efficiently through the water.

Bighead carp have a long, torpedo-shaped body with a broad, flattened head and a small mouth. They must feed almost constantly due to their lack of a stomach.

©Ivan Mateev/Shutterstock.com

History of Bighead Carp in Indiana

As mentioned, bighead carp aren’t native to Indiana. So how did they find themselves in the state? Let’s find out.

Introduction to the United States 

The introduction of bighead carp to the United States was an unintended consequence of their use in aquaculture. They were initially imported from Asia to control the growth of algae in ponds used for fish farming. But flooding and other events allowed bighead carp to escape into nearby waterways, leading to their eventual spread throughout the United States.

Spread to Indiana 

Bighead carp were first detected in Indiana in the 1990s. Their population has since grown significantly. They’re now present in many waterways throughout the state, including:

Bighead Carp’s Diet and Predators

Bighead carp are opportunistic feeders with a varied diet. Although they have few natural predators in Indiana, several species have been documented preying on them.

Primary Diet 

Bighead carp’s primary diet consists of the following:

  • Plankton
  • Algae
  • Detritus

They’re filter feeders and use their gill rakers to strain small particles from the water. Plankton is their primary nutrition source and a critical component of their diet.

Secondary Diet 

While plankton, algae, and detritus are the primary components of their diet, bighead carp also consume:

These opportunistic feeders will consume almost anything they can fit into their mouths.

Relationship to the Fishing Industry 

While anglers do not typically target bighead carp in Indiana, their impact on the ecosystem can indirectly affect the fishing industry. 

Reducing the availability of plankton and small fish can lead to a decline in the sportfish population that rely on these organisms as a food source. 

Additionally, bighead carp can compete with sportfish for resources, further impacting the fishing industry.

Natural Predators 

Few natural bighead carp predators exist in Indiana due to the fish’s large size and armored scales that protect them from many potential predators. But some species have been documented preying on them, including:

alligator gar

Some species have been documented preying on bighead carp, including the

alligator

gar.

©Charlotte Bleijenberg/Shutterstock.com

Current Status of Bighead Carp in Indiana

The bighead carp population in Indiana is well-established and continues to grow. Efforts to control their spread and minimize their impact on the ecosystem are ongoing.

Population Size 

The population of bighead carp in Indiana is significant, with their presence documented in many waterways throughout the state. Their large size and high reproductive rate make them particularly challenging to control once established in an ecosystem.

Potential for Future Spread 

The potential for bighead carp to spread to new waterways in Indiana is significant. 

Their ability to outcompete native species and adapt to various environmental conditions makes them a formidable invasive species. Continued efforts to prevent their spread and control their populations are critical to minimizing their impact on Indiana’s aquatic ecosystems.

Impact of Bighead Carp on Indiana’s Ecosystem

The presence of bighead carp in Indiana’s waterways has had a significant impact on the state’s aquatic ecosystems, including:

  • Changes to the food web
  • Competition for resources
  • Potential harm to human health

Changes to the Food Web 

Bighead carp are filter feeders that consume large amounts of plankton. This can reduce the availability of this critical food source for other aquatic organisms. As a result, the presence of bighead carp can have a cascading effect on the food web, potentially leading to a decline in the population of other species that rely on these organisms as a food source.

Competition for Resources 

Bighead carp compete with native species for resources such as food and habitat. This can further disrupt the balance of the ecosystem. In addition, as they’re particularly effective at consuming plankton, other filter-feeding species may struggle to compete for these resources, further altering the ecosystem.

Potential Harm to Human Health 

Bighead carp have been associated with various human health concerns in other regions where they’re established. They’re known to accumulate high levels of contaminants such as mercury, which can pose a risk to human health if consumed in large quantities.

Economic Impact 

The presence of bighead carp in Indiana’s waterways can have a significant economic impact, particularly on commercial and recreational fishing industries. In addition, the reduction in native fish populations can lead to decreased opportunities for fishing. Introducing bighead carp can also shift the types of fish available in Indiana’s waterways.

Importance of Addressing the Issue 

Addressing the impact of bighead carp on Indiana’s ecosystem is critical to:

  • Protecting the health and balance of aquatic ecosystems
  • Supporting commercial and recreational fishing industries
  • Safeguarding human health

Bighead carp are filter feeders that consume large amounts of plankton. This can reduce the availability of this critical food source for other aquatic organisms.

©Rostislav Stefanek/Shutterstock.com

Efforts to Control Bighead Carp in Indiana

Efforts to control the population of Bighead Carp in Indiana are ongoing. Various strategies have been employed to mitigate their impact on the state’s aquatic ecosystems. They include:

  • Commercial fishing
  • Acoustic deterrents
  • Developing barriers
  • Public education and outreach

Let’s look at each strategy in detail.

Commercial Fishing 

Commercial fishing has been used to remove bighead carp from Indiana’s waterways. However, targeting bighead carp with nets can effectively reduce their populations, particularly in the most concentrated areas.

Acoustic Deterrents 

The use of acoustic deterrents is another strategy being employed to control the spread of bighead carp in Indiana. By emitting unappealing sounds to the fish, this method can help deter their movement and prevent them from spreading to new waterways.

Developing Barriers

Developing barriers to prevent the spread of bighead carp to new waterways is also being pursued in Indiana. Barriers such as electric barriers or physical barriers can be effective at preventing their movement, particularly in areas where they’re concentrated.

Public Education and Outreach 

Public education and outreach efforts are also being pursued. These efforts aim to increase awareness of the impact of bighead carp on Indiana’s aquatic ecosystems and encourage public participation in control efforts. By engaging the public in these efforts, the state can work to mitigate the impact of this invasive species.

Future Outlook and Recommendations

As efforts to control the spread of bighead carp in Indiana continue, the future outlook for this invasive species remains uncertain. But several recommendations can help mitigate the impact of bighead carp on Indiana’s aquatic ecosystems.

Continued Monitoring and Research 

Ongoing monitoring and research efforts are essential to understand better the spread and impact of bighead carp in Indiana. This information can help to inform the development of more effective control strategies and support ongoing efforts to protect the health of Indiana’s waterways.

Collaborative Efforts 

Collaborative efforts between government agencies, researchers, and the public can help to increase the effectiveness of control strategies. They can also support ongoing efforts to mitigate the impact of Bighead Carp on Indiana’s waterways.

Prevention and Education 

Prevention and education efforts are also critical to controlling the spread of bighead carp in Indiana. 

These efforts can include the following:

  • Promoting responsible recreational activities that help to prevent the spread of invasive species
  • Educating the public on the risks associated with introducing invasive species to new waterways
  • Supporting ongoing research to develop new prevention strategies

Regulation and Policy 

Regulation and policy changes may also be necessary to control the spread of bighead carp in Indiana effectively. This can include:

  • Implementing regulations on the transport and introduction of invasive species
  • Developing policies to support the development of effective control strategies
  • Investing in the resources necessary to combat the impact of invasive species on Indiana’s aquatic ecosystems

Restoration Efforts 

Restoration efforts may be necessary to support the recovery of Indiana’s aquatic ecosystems in the wake of the impact of bighead carp. This can include:

  • Supporting the reintroduction of native species that have been impacted by the spread of bighead carp
  • Implementing habitat restoration efforts
  • Investing in ongoing research to support the long-term health and resilience of Indiana’s waterways

Where is White River, Indiana Located on a Map?

The White River, a river with two forks, runs through central and southern Indiana and is the primary tributary to the Wabash River. The western fork, recognized as the main stem of the river by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names, is responsible for the majority of the river’s 362-mile length.

Here is White River, Indiana on a map:

Key Takeaways

The presence of bighead carp in Indiana’s waterways presents a significant threat to the health and sustainability of the state’s aquatic ecosystems. 

As an invasive species, bighead carp have the potential to disrupt the balance of these ecosystems, displacing native species and altering the food chain in ways that can have long-term consequences. 

While efforts to control the spread of the species are ongoing, it’s clear that continued monitoring, research, and collaboration will be necessary to mitigate their impact on the state’s waterways effectively. However, through a combination of prevention, education, and restoration efforts, it may be possible to protect the health and resilience of Indiana’s aquatic ecosystems and preserve these valuable resources.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © Katoosha/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Alan is a freelance writer and an avid traveler. He specializes in travel content. When he visits home he enjoys spending time with his family Rottie, Opie.

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