17 Incredible Dinosaurs That Start With F

Zhenyuanlong fossil
© Mark Brandon/Shutterstock.com

Written by Sanaphay Rattanavong

Published: September 22, 2023

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Dinosaurs have long captured our imaginations and ignited a sense of awe and wonder in young and old alike. While the Tyrannosaurus rex and the Velociraptor often hog the spotlight, an entire alphabet of lesser-known yet equally captivating dinosaurs awaits your discovery. Today, we explore dinosaurs starting with the letter “F.” But a word of caution: not every dinosaur on this list has official recognition.

The Certified “F” Dinosaurs: Official Natural History Museum’s Perspective

When it comes to scientific accuracy, few sources can rival the American Museum of Natural History. The museum’s carefully curated list of “F” dinosaurs includes well-researched species such as:

Lantern in front of the American Museum of Natural History, Manhattan, New York City

The American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan, New York City. Can you spot the dinosaur?

©Kenny Michiels/Shutterstock.com

Fabrosaurus

This petite herbivore roamed the Late Jurassic landscapes of what is now Zimbabwe. The Fabrosaurus was built for speed, with its slender body and long, agile legs.

Falcarius

A medium-sized, lesser-known member of the theropod group that was once abundant throughout North America during the early Cretaceous period. It had unique serrated teeth in the front of the jaw, which it used to clip through tough plant matter.

The Comprehensive but Unofficial Dinosaurs

Various sources offer extensive lists of dinosaurs that start with “F,” including well-known names and lesser-known dinosaurs. However, it’s essential to note that aside from the two dinosaurs discussed above, none on this list has received official recognition.

Ferganasaurus

A large, long-necked dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period that lived in what is now Uzbekistan. With an estimated weight of around 10 tons and a height exceeding 30 feet, this giant herbivore was a remarkable presence in its habitat.

Ferganocephale

A small ornithischian dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous period found in Uzbekistan. Known for its distinctive domed skull, this neornithischian dinosaur hails from the Middle Jurassic Balabansai Svita in Kyrgyzstan. Experts speculate that the dinosaur used its domed skull either for display or for head-butting rivals within its species. However, keep in mind that scientists consider this genus dubious.

Ferrisaurus

Hailing from the Late Cretaceous period, Ferrisaurus holds the title as the first non-avian dinosaur described from British Columbia, Canada. This small herbivore adds a fresh chapter to our understanding of dinosaur diversity in North America. This leptoceratopsid ceratopsian’s type and only species is Ferrisaurus sustutensis.

Foraminacephale

This pachycephalosaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous epoch left fossilized footprints in Canada. Its discovery adds to our growing understanding of North America’s dinosaur diversity and distribution. It is also a questionable genus of basal sauropodomorphs from China’s Early Jurassic Lufeng Formation, with the type species F. youngi.

Fosterovenator

Researchers discovered the fossils of the Fosterovenator, a Late Jurassic theropod dinosaur, in Wyoming, USA. This dinosaur is a genus of ceratosaur, specifically known from the Morrison Formation.

Stegosaurus dinosaur footprint with slide mark in fluvial sandstone from the Jurassic of Colorado, USA (public display, Morrison Natural History Museum, Morrison, Colorado, USA).

The Morrison Natural History Museum in Morrison, Colorado, exhibits a stegosaurus dinosaur footprint accompanied with a slide mark, both preserved in Jurassic fluvial sandstone originating from the Morrison Formation in Colorado.

©James St. John / CC BY 2.0 – Original / License

Fostoria

Paleontologists found Fostoria’s remains in Australia. It was an Early Cretaceous herbivorous dinosaur. This dinosaur was a herbivore that lived during the same period and was indigenous to Australia.

Fruitadens

A Late Jurassic small herbivorous dinosaur, one of the smallest known dinosaurs that lived in what is now North America. It belonged to the heterodontosaurid family.

Fukuivenator

An Early Cretaceous theropod dinosaur found in Japan. This dinosaur is a genus that lived during the early Cretaceous period in what is now Japan.

Fukuititan

A lesser-known sauropod from the Early Cretaceous period found in Japan. It had a long neck and tail, supported by four pillar-like legs, and is a genus of titanosauriform sauropod.

Fulengia

Researchers unearthed Fulengia’s fossils, an Early Cretaceous period dinosaur, in China. Scientists consider it a dubious genus of basal sauropodomorph, specifically from the Early Jurassic Lufeng Formation in China. Its uncertain status adds a layer of mystery to our understanding of dinosaur diversity.

Fulgurotherium

Experts found the fossils of this Early Cretaceous small ornithopod dinosaur whose fossils in Australia. This dinosaur was also a small ornithopod from the same period and the same region.

Fusuisaurus

Discovered in China, Fusuisaurus roamed the Earth during the Early Cretaceous period. This sauropod dinosaur adds another piece to the puzzle of prehistoric life in Asia.

Fushanosaurus

 A titanosauriform sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous period. Paleontologists found fossils of this species in China.

Futalognkosaurus

A Late Cretaceous giant long-necked dinosaur. Considered one of the largest animals to ever walk the Earth, its immense size is awe-inspiring.

Fylax

Fylax, a Late Jurassic armored dinosaur, left its fossilized legacy in Wyoming, USA. Its discovery enriches our understanding of the types of dinosaurs that once roamed North America.

Each dinosaur’s time period and anatomical characteristics offer unique insights into Earth’s prehistoric landscape, from towering giants like Futalognkosaurus to lesser-known species like Fukuivenator. What’s remarkable is the global span of these ancient creatures; their fossils have been unearthed in locations as far-flung as Uzbekistan, Japan, and Canada. This list serves as both a time capsule and a world map, a testament to the extraordinary diversity and geographic reach of Earth’s former inhabitants.

A skeleton of Amargasaurus in the Ultimate Dinosaurs traveling exhibition at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas.

In the world of dinosaurs, such nearly complete skeletons as this Amargasaurus is the exception, not the rule.

©William Cushman/Shutterstock.com

The Dino-Sized Discrepancy: What Makes a Dinosaur Official?

When it comes to identifying a bona fide dinosaur, the journey is both intricate and fascinating, often resembling more of an arduous scientific quest than a simple naming ceremony. Earning the title of an “official dinosaur” demands rigorous scientific scrutiny. This distinction often culminates in peer-reviewed research and a wealth of fossil evidence. Formal recognition typically comes after meticulous description in a scientific journal, backed by the replication of findings. This rigorous process is crucial to ensuring that the dinosaur in question is not a misclassification or merely a fragment of another species.

The Basic Framework: Historical Context and Anatomical Criteria

Sir Richard Owen coined the term “dinosaur” in 1841, drawing from the fragmentary fossils of three British dinosaurs: Iguanodon, Megalosaurus, and Hylaeosaurus. Owen’s early descriptions laid the foundation for the dinosaur category, concentrating on anatomical features. Intriguingly, scientists have since recognized some of these characteristics as either more common among reptiles or unique to specific dinosaur groups.

Dinosaurs are ancient animals with upright limbs that lived solely on land during the Mesozoic Era, which lasted from 252 to 66 million years ago. This broad definition encapsulates the scientific consensus on what a dinosaur is fundamentally.

The Living Legacy: Birds as Dinosaurs

It’s important to note that our traditional understanding of dinosaurs has evolved—much like dinosaurs themselves. Birds, for example, emerged from small carnivorous dinosaurs during the Jurassic period. This fact radically alters the perception that dinosaurs are entirely extinct and challenges the categorization of dinosaurs solely as “reptiles.”

Refinement and Redefinition: Science’s Self-Correcting Nature

As paleontologists unearth more and better fossils, they continually refine the definition of “dinosaur.” Redefinition is not a sign of weakness; instead, it’s an integral part of the scientific process. Our understanding improves over time, allowing us to correct misconceptions and sharpen the focus on what truly defines a dinosaur.

Beyond the Basics: Specialized Groups

Within the expansive realm of dinosaurs, unique anatomical or behavioral traits define various subgroups. For instance, ankylosaurians stand out as armored, herbivorous quadrupeds, while stegosaurians are recognizable by their plates and also live as herbivorous quadrupeds. Ceratopsians often sport neck frills and can be either bipedal or quadrupedal herbivores.

Clearly, the official designation of a dinosaur is a meticulous undertaking, shaped by both historical definitions and ongoing scientific advancements. From the earliest fossils in the British Isles to the nuances of herbivorous quadrupeds in different parts of the world, understanding what makes a dinosaur “official” is a complex yet fascinating journey through time, research, and reinterpretation.

Zhenyuanlong fossil

Scientists must piece together the fossil record, such as this fossil of a Zhenyuanlong, to build tenuous relationships spanning 165 million years between few and far between evidence—a difficult undertaking, to say the least.

©Mark Brandon/Shutterstock.com

Conclusion

The world of dinosaurs is as complex as it is fascinating. While it’s tempting to take every list at face value, a discerning eye is crucial. Relying on scientifically accurate sources like the American Museum of Natural History ensures that you’re getting the most reliable information. At the same time, broader lists offer a glimpse into the potential diversity of life millions of years ago—even if not all of it has been officially recognized. So, the next time you find yourself captivated by dinosaurs that start with the letter “F,” remember not all are official, but all are fascinating in their own right.

Official List of Dinosaurs That Start With “F”

Dinosaur NameBrief Description
FabrosaurusA small herbivore from the Late Jurassic period first discovered in Zimbabwe. It had a slender body supported by long legs, making it well-suited for running.
FalcariusA medium-sized, lesser-known member of the theropod group that was once abundant throughout North America during the early Cretaceous period. It had unique serrated teeth in the front of the jaw, which it used to clip through tough plant matter.
Summary table of official “F” dinosaurs

Unofficial List of Dinosaurs That Start With “F”

Dinosaur NameBrief Description
FerganasaurusA big dinosaur with a long neck that lived in what is now Uzbekistan during the Late Jurassic.
FerganocephaleA small ornithischian dinosaur that lived in what is now Uzbekistan during the Late Cretaceous period.
FerrisaurusA small herbivorous dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous period. Fossils found in British Columbia, Canada.
ForaminacephaleA pachycephalosaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous period. Fossils found in Canada.
FosterovenatorA theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period. Fossils found in Wyoming, USA.
FostoriaA herbivorous dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous period. Fossils found in Australia.
FruitadensA small herbivorous dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period. It was one of the smallest dinosaurs known.
FukuititanA sauropod that lived in Japan during the Early Cretaceous period. It had a long neck and tail, and four pillar-like legs.
FukuivenatorA theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous period. Fossils found in Japan.
FulengiaA small herbivorous dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous period. Fossils found in China.
FulgurotheriumA small ornithopod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous period. Fossils found in Australia.
FushanosaurusA titanosauriform sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous period. Fossils found in China.
FusuisaurusA sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous period. Fossils found in China.
FutalognkosaurusA giant long-necked dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous period. One of the largest animals to ever walk the Earth.
FylaxAn armored dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period. Fossils found in Wyoming, USA.
Unofficial list of “F” dinosaurs

Please note that while these dinosaurs are mentioned in various online sources, they may not have been officially recognized due to lack of peer-reviewed research or substantial fossil evidence.


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About the Author

Embracing the interplay between the arts, nature, and technology, Sanaphay Rattanavong sculpts narratives through both data and human/animal-focused lenses at A-Z Animals, primarily in the realms of weather, culture, cleantech, and climate resilience. His specializations also include creativity and animal intelligence. And cats. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Bennington College and has labored for more than 10 years in the trenches of journalistic, blog, magazine, and fiction writing. An outdoor enthusiast who also enjoys the finer things in culture, Sanaphay resides in Minneapolis, Minnesota, with stints in Toronto, Ontario.

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