Koala Predators: These 11 Animals Won’t Hesitate to Kill and Eat Koalas

Written by Heather Hall
Published: April 15, 2023
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Koalas are marsupials native to Australia. They have a distinctive bear-like appearance and feed mostly on eucalyptus leaves. Koalas typically inhabit forests, woodlands, and mangrove swamps in the coastal areas of eastern and southern Australia. Interestingly their range is also expanding into other parts of the continent. In addition to threats from climate change, koala populations face danger from predators. These predators hunt them for food or out of territorial aggression.

Koala Predators: What Eats Koalas?

Our friend, the koala, has many predators in Australia. They are especially vulnerable when they are young.

  1. Dingo
  2. Domestic Dog
  3. Fox
  4. Wild Dog
  5. Amethystine Python
  6. White-Lipped Python
  7. Australian Barn Own
  8. Powerful Owl
  9. Quoll
  10. Goanna
  11. Wedge-Tailed Eagle

Koala Predators: Dingo

Most Vicious Animals

When it comes to koalas, dingoes will often kill them by biting through the throat and neck of the animal while it’s still alive.

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A dingo is a wild canine native to Australia that is believed to have descended from South Asian domestic dogs. Dingoes are usually about the same size as medium-sized domestic dogs and can vary in color from sandy yellow, reddish-brown, or even black. They typically hunt at night by stalking their prey until they find an opportunity to attack. When it comes to koalas, dingoes will often kill them by biting through the throat and neck of the animal while it’s still alive. Once a koala has been killed, dingoes may consume its flesh either at the site of death or drag it away for later consumption in private.

Koala Predators: Domestic Dog

A domestic dog is a canine species that humans have domesticated. They are typically kept as pets and bred for specific characteristics like size and temperament. Dogs have an exceptional sense of smell, which they use to hunt prey. They will often track down their target using their noses to pick up on subtle scents in the environment. Domestic dogs can also be trained to search for wild game or locate certain items, such as truffles or other food sources. When hunting koalas, domestic dogs often cannot withstand the strong prey drive to chase after a running animal. They often kill them simply out of instinct.

Fox

Red Fox at Night in the United Kingdom

When hunting koalas, foxes will often wait below them until the right moment arises to launch an ambush attack.

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Foxes are small- to medium-sized carnivorous animals that belong to the family Canidae, which includes wolves, jackals, and domestic dogs. They have long snouts, sharp teeth for catching prey, and distinctive white-tipped tails. Foxes use a combination of hearing and scenting abilities to hunt their prey in both day and night conditions. They will typically stalk their quarry until it is within striking range before pouncing on it. When hunting koalas, foxes will often wait below them until the right moment arises to launch an ambush attack. Koala cubs are most vulnerable when their mothers leave the nest. Whilst koalas are not their preferred meal choice due to their size and thick fur coats, they may take advantage of this slow-moving animal’s vulnerability if nothing else is available.

Koala Predators: Wild Dog

Wild dogs have been majorly implicated in decreasing koalas in Australia. Research from 2013-2017 on 503 koalas in the wild showed that 81.3% of the 144 koala deaths could be linked to wild dogs, with 38 more deaths suspected but not confirmed. Without control of wild dogs and disease, the koala population may have reached local extinction within a decade. One male dog that dodged capture during the study was believed to be responsible for 75 koala deaths by himself.

Amethystine Python

Amethystine python

Amethystine Python

s are ambush predators that hunt by lying in wait for unsuspecting prey before striking swiftly and without warning.

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An Amethystine Python (also known as a Scrub Python) is a large snake that is native to Australia, New Guinea, and the Indonesian islands. It can grow to lengths up to 26 feet, making it one of the longest snakes in the world. In addition to its size, it also has a distinctive pattern consisting of yellow spots on a black background with white stripes running along its back.

Amethystine Pythons are ambush predators that hunt by lying in wait for unsuspecting prey before striking swiftly and without warning. They usually feed on small mammals such as rats and bandicoots, but they have been known to consume koalas and wallabies if given the opportunity. When hunting koalas specifically, these snakes will usually coil around them until they suffocate before swallowing their victim whole.

White-Lipped Python

A white-lipped python is a species of large nonvenomous snake native to New Guinea and parts of Australia. They are one of the few snake species that actively hunt their prey rather than waiting in ambush for it. White-lipped pythons usually hunt at night, when they can take advantage of their excellent eyesight in the dark. They often climb trees and lie in wait for passing koalas, which they then strike quickly with powerful jaws before constricting them until they suffocate or die from shock. In addition to koalas, white-lipped pythons feed on small mammals, birds, lizards, and other snakes.

Australian Barn Owl

Eastern Barn Owl in South Australia

Barn owls typically hunt by flying low over open country in pursuit of their prey and using their acute hearing to detect movement from several meters away.

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An Australian barn owl (Tyto Alba) is a species of owl native to Australia, New Guinea, and some parts of the Solomon Islands. They are small to medium-sized owls with distinctive heart-shaped faces and yellow eyes. Barn owls typically hunt by flying low over open country in pursuit of their prey and using their acute hearing to detect movement from several meters away. Once spotted, they swoop down and capture their food with sharp talons before devouring it on the spot or carrying it back to a perch where they can enjoy a leisurely meal. Some prefer hunting at night, while others will take advantage of daylight hours if they find abundant prey items during that time. Their diet consists primarily of small mammals such as rodents, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and other birds, but they have also been known to feed on koalas occasionally!

Powerful Owl

A powerful owl is a large species of owl that can be found in Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand. They are one of the few raptors capable of hunting both during the day and night. They hunt mainly by perching high up in trees and then swooping down to catch their prey with their strong talons. These owls prefer to hunt small mammals such as possums, rabbits, bandicoots, lizards, and sometimes even koalas. Koalas are usually not an easy target for these owls since they live high up in eucalyptus trees, but when food is scarce powerful owls will make them a part of their diet. This makes them one of the most dangerous predators for koalas as they won’t hesitate to kill and eat them if given an opportunity!

Quoll

Close up of a Spotted Quoll or Tiger Quoll

Quolls hunt by stealthily stalking their prey before pouncing on it with their sharp claws and teeth.

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A quoll is a carnivorous marsupial native to Australia and New Guinea. Quolls come in six species, four of which are found in Australia: the Eastern Quoll, Northern Quoll, Western Quoll, and Tiger Quoll. They can range from the size of a mouse up to medium-sized cats and have fur that ranges from black or brown to white or spotted.

Quolls hunt by stealthily stalking their prey before pouncing on it with their sharp claws and teeth. They mainly feed on small mammals such as rats, mice, birds, reptiles, and amphibians, but they also hunt for eggs and carrion when necessary. In addition to these smaller creatures, quolls are known to occasionally kill young koalas for food if given the opportunity – making them one of the predators capable of preying upon this iconic Australian animal.

Goanna

Goannas, also known as monitor lizards, are large lizards native to Australia and New Guinea, typically growing up to 6 feet long. They are omnivorous animals with a diet comprising smaller reptiles, insects, small mammals, eggs, and carrion.

Goannas use their keen sense of sight and smell when hunting for food to locate prey. Once they have located a potential meal, they will wait patiently until the optimal moment before launching an ambush from hiding spots such as trees or rock crevices. Goannas also employ ambush tactics when hunting koalas, using their long necks to reach up into tree branches where unsuspecting koalas may be sleeping or grazing on eucalyptus leaves. Unfortunately for koalas, these powerful predators can overpower them easily due to their size advantage and strong jaws capable of crushing bone.

Wedge-Tailed Eagle

the wedge tail eagle has spread its wings ready for flight

They are the largest raptor in Australia, with an incredible wingspan of 9 feet!

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A wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila Audax) is a large bird of prey native to Australia, New Guinea, and Indonesia. They are the largest raptor in Australia, with an incredible wingspan of 9 feet! Wedge-tailed eagles have brownish feathers on their backs that become lighter towards the chest.

Wedge-tailed eagles hunt by soaring high above an area, looking for small animals such as rabbits or hares. They can also hunt other birds, such as parrots or cockatoos. When they spot potential prey, they will swiftly drop down from their perch and grab it with their talons before flying off to devour it elsewhere. They have also been known to attack koalas, although koala is not their favorite food.

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About the Author

Heather Hall is a writer at A-Z Animals, where her primary focus is on plants and animals. Heather has been writing and editing since 2012 and holds a Bachelor of Science in Horticulture. As a resident of the Pacific Northwest, Heather enjoys hiking, gardening, and trail running through the mountains with her dogs.

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