Man Rides His Bike Straight Into a Rattlesnake Den

Written by Opal
Published: July 26, 2022
© Viktor Loki/Shutterstock.com
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When you think of going for a bike ride, you may imagine strolling along a dirt or paved path surrounded by beautiful nature. Perhaps you imagine zooming down the bike lane of a big city. Whatever you picture, it likely doesn’t involve a den of wild rattlesnakes. 

A man named Ryan with the YouTube channel called “Ryan First Diver,” with nearly 40,000 subscribers takes a ride directly to a rattlesnake den. He gets a call about two young mountain bikers encountering a rattlers’ den on the side of the bike trail. 

By the time he gets there, you quickly see and hear the rattlesnakes. Rattlesnakes are among the most easily recognized reptiles in the animal kingdom, not only due to their outward look but also due to the way they move their tails in response to danger to warn potential prey to keep away. Their name comes from the sound a rattlesnake produces when it shakes its tail, which is similar to a high-pitched baby rattle.

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Rattlesnakes hiss, which sounds almost like a cat, and shake their rattles in order to dissuade predators from approaching.

When Ryan approaches the den, he sees one female rattlesnake that he mentions could be pregnant. Female rattlers typically measure 36 inches in length and have a larger physique than their male counterparts. Ryan later meets with the original mountain bikes that reported the den in the first place.

Rattlesnakes frequently construct dens out of abandoned rodent burrows since they are unable to excavate holes for themselves. Snakes frequently seek areas on steep hillsides with lots of sunlight. These slithering critters can also hibernate behind logs, stacks of wood, or rock.

When they approach the second den of the video, unless you’re an expert, you likely wouldn’t even notice it. They slowly walk closer to the entrance and sure enough, spot a relaxing rattlesnake, all curled up, almost as if sleeping. 

One comment under the video reads, “This dude is crazy walking in there with shorts on and exposed legs! There’s no way I’d do that.” We couldn’t agree more. If you are going to go searching for rattlesnake dens, be sure to have long pants and closed-toe shoes on for protection. 

Ryan goes on to suggest that anyone mountain biking should stay on north-facing slopes that are shaded. This will prevent any unwanted encounters with rattlesnakes. Would you want Ryan’s job? Imagine someone calls you about a dangerous animal and your job is to come to address the situation. It takes a brave and educated individual to handle these slithery serpents as well as he does. Check out the wild video below to get an up-close and personal rattlesnake experience. 

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Rattlesnake
Crotalus molossus is a venomous pit viper species found in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Common names: black-tailed rattlesnake, green rattler, Northern black-tailed rattlesnake.
© Viktor Loki/Shutterstock.com

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About the Author

When she's not busy playing with her several guinea pigs or her cat Finlay Kirstin is writing articles to help other pet owners. She's also a REALTOR® in the Twin Cities and is passionate about social justice. There's nothing that beats a rainy day with a warm cup of tea and Frank Sinatra on vinyl for this millennial.

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