See A Gigantic Shark Leap Onto A Boat With Fisherman and Thrash Violently

Written by Emilio Brown
Updated: December 27, 2022
© wildestanimal/Shutterstock.com
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Continue Reading To See This Amazing Video

Key Points:

  • There are two living species of mako shark – the longfin, and shortfin mako sharks. The longfin mako is a slightly larger shark and is able to grow up to 14 feet long, and shortfin makos grow up to 13 feet.
  • The shortfin mako is the fastest shark in the world, and with its strong swimming is able to reach speeds up to 46 mph. 
  • Mako sharks generally only attack fish, and even with their larger size, they are generally not dangerous to humans.

Fishermen always look to catch the largest fish, but with their rods and not their boats. These fishermen in Whitianga, New Zealand were in for a shock when a giant mako shark jumped into their boat. Eventually, the shark was able to wriggle back into the water, but it was a breathtaking sight to see while it landed aboard.

Mako sharks are carnivorous predators and are able to sense wounded prey from far in the water like other sharks. The bait in the water used by the fishermen is what attracted this shark to jump in the boat. Mako sharks generally only attack fish, and even with their larger size, they are generally not dangerous to humans. Only nine unprovoked attacks have been linked to the mako sharks, with the attacks dating as far back as 1580.

Shortfin mako shark swimming just under the surface, offshore, about 50 kilometers past Western Cape in South Africa. This picture was taken during a blue water baited shark dive.
Mako sharks typically only attack fish. The bait the fishermen in the video used is what presumably attracted the mako shark.

How Big Do Mako Sharks Get?

There are two living species of mako shark, which are the longfin, and shortfin mako sharks. The longfin mako is a slightly larger shark and is able to grow up to 14 feet long, and shortfin makos grow up to 13 feet. Weight for this shark typically ranges from 130 to 300 lbs, but the largest ever recorded weighed 1,221 lbs.

The two shark species are very similar, but there are slight differences in their appearance. The pectoral fins of the longfin mako shark are larger, and they also have larger eyes. The two sharks’ bodies and the underside of their snout are also different between the two species.

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While the longfin mako shark is the larger species, the shortfin mako shark is the faster one. The shortfin mako is the fastest shark in the world, and with its strong swimming is able to reach speeds up to 46 mph. 

Fastest Water Animals
One major factor in how mako sharks are able to move so fast is the unique structure of their skin, especially around the flank and fin regions of their bodies.

©iStock.com/Alessandro De Maddalena

Is This Common Behavior For Sharks?

Even with their size, mako sharks are able to breach the water, and sometimes grab prey from below. Large sharks like great whites that can weigh over 2,000 lbs are also able to breach out of the water, and it is an amazing sight to see. Sharks are able to swim fast, and their jumping ability is why they can land on boats like in the video. 

Sharks attacking boats may sometimes occur when crossing their waters. Confused when swimming, sharks may be attracted to boats because of their shadows, vibrations, and the electrical pulses they give off. 

There are thousands of species of sharks that live in the ocean, and they have roamed the earth’s water for 400 million years. You may not want to get an up-close view of a shark like these fishermen did, but they are amazing fish. 

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The Featured Image

The mako shark is one of the fastest fish, and it is considered dangerous to humans because of its speed — it can attack aggressively and quickly. It has even been known to
The mako shark is considered dangerous to humans because of its speed — it can attack aggressively and quickly. It has even been known to "jump" into fishing boats!
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About the Author

Spiders, snakes, and lizards are my favorite types of animals, and I enjoy keeping some species as pets. I love learning about the various wonders nature has to offer and have been a writer for 5 years. In my spare time, you can find me getting out into nature.

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Sources
  1. https://oceana.org/marine-life/shortfin-mako-shark/ (1970) Shortfin Mako Shark
  2. https://www.britannica.com/animal/mako-shark (1970) Mako Shark
  3. https://www.marinebio.org/species/shortfin-mako-sharks/isurus-oxyrinchus/ (1970) Marine Biology Shortfin Mako