Watch a Fearless Boy Dive in and Swim With Literally Hundreds of Crocodiles

© Kmanoj / Creative Commons

Written by Angie Menjivar

Updated: November 17, 2023

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There are plenty of wildlife experiences you can pay for to enjoy wildlife up close. You can go on safari, hop on a boat to whale watch, and even swim with dolphins. What you might not think to do is swim with crocodiles.

You would especially not send your child off to swim with them while you film. But this next clip just goes to show how humans have different preferences and some are a bit more fearless than others!

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Crocodile family including father, mother, and baby traveling on mother's back

Watch how these baby crocs react when a child enters their pool.

©Orhan Cam/Shutterstock.com

Do Crocodiles Eat Humans?

There are two types of crocodiles known for preying on humans and they include saltwater crocodiles and Nile crocodiles. They’re opportunistic reptiles and their bites are bone-crushingly powerful — even more so than that of lions.

Baby crocodiles are only 30 centimeters in length and weigh only 30 grams.

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Luckily, not every crocodile species is dangerous to humans. However, anyone traveling in areas where salt crocodiles or Nile crocodiles live should be extremely careful. Crocodiles are sneaky, stalking their prey from the water. Humans may not be able to spot them before it’s much too late.

It Is Normal For Baby Crocodiles To Be Docile?

Freshwater crocodile hatching, poke their head out of the egg in hatchery room at crocodile farm.

Even baby crocodiles can bite, and rarely can they be tamed.

©Arunee Rodloy/Shutterstock.com

Saltwater crocodiles can be fierce, even when they are just babies. Despite looking pretty cute, they are born ready for a fight.

Their bites may not be deadly just yet, but they are not friendly like cats or dogs. While some crocodile lovers feel that these creatures are able to maintain a relationship with a person on rare occasions, it’s important to understand that all crocodiles, from babies to grown-ups, can bite.

While some individuals can be more aggressive than others, it’s important to treat all of them with respect and caution. A bite from a baby crocodile might be more surprising than painful for an adult, but a fully grown crocodile can be deadly.

Are Baby Crocodiles Dangerous?

Saltwater crocodiles are aggressive, even those that are barely a week old. They seem to be born with a ferocious nature, displaying dangerous qualities just after hatching.

They might look cute, and their bites can’t quite kill just yet, but they are not affectionate the way humans are.

In this next clip, you watch as a young boy prepares to dive right into baby crocodile-infested waters. It’s unclear what environment this is or why the smaller crocs seem unfazed by the presence of the little human in their pool.

Animals That Lay Eggs: Crocodiles

Newborn freshwater crocodiles come equipped with sharp teeth.

©Arunee Rodloy/Shutterstock.com

The kiddo lands in the water with a splash and swims forward toward where the baby crocs are all swimming on top of one another. The boy holds his breath and puts his head underwater, swimming through the seemingly unbothered crocs.

At one point, you see the boy’s elated face up close as he floats in the water, a baby croc lounging on his bum. At that same moment, another baby croc is swimming beside his leg. The video ends abruptly and loops back to the moment when he lands in the water with a splash.

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About the Author

Angie Menjivar is a writer at A-Z-Animals primarily covering pets, wildlife, and the human spirit. She has 14 years of experience, holds a Bachelor's degree in psychology, and continues her studies into human behavior, working as a copywriter in the mental health space. She resides in North Carolina, where she's fallen in love with thunderstorms and uses them as an excuse to get extra cuddles from her three cats.

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