Watch a Snake Emerge From the Ceiling and Get Whipped by a Spinning Fan

Written by Kirstin Harrington
Updated: October 23, 2023
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Key Points

  • Something that may be comforting to know is that most venomous snakes have limited climbing abilities and if you find one in your attic, it’s likely it isn’t venomous.
  • The long, lanky body of the snake can be seen beginning to wave in movement with the air coming off of the blades.
  • With one wrong move, the snake hits one of the fan blades and goes flying straight in the direction of the person filming.

Snakes can get into a home in a variety of ways. They’ve been discovered in attics, the walls, and even in toilets! One of the main reasons these slithery critters make their way into our homes is to find food and shelter. 

Insulation around drywall, the ceiling, and other spots in an attic are some of the most popular places for rodents to nest. The areas near the ceiling and drywall make the ideal environment for a snake. 

Being cold-blooded, they’ll additionally have a safe haven but also be able to take advantage of the warmth that rises from the inside of the house. The video shows what appears to be a rat snake coming through a hole in the ceiling where a fan is spinning.

Watch the Video Below to See Chaos Ensue 

A Notable Exit

Something that may be comforting to know is that most venomous snakes have limited climbing abilities. If you find one in your attic, it’s likely that it isn’t venomous. As the snake slithers its way out of the ceiling, it quickly becomes perplexed by the ceiling fan.

Juvenile Gray Ratsnake (Pantherophis spiloides)

There are many types of rat snakes, including the grey rat snake.

©Melinda Fawver/Shutterstock.com

The long, lanky body of the snake begins to wave in movement with the air coming off of the blades. The way it moves is almost mesmerizing. With one wrong move, the snake hits one of the fan blades and goes flying straight in the direction of the person filming. 

Are Fans Dangerous For Pet Snakes?

Trans-Pecos ratsnake

Trans-Pecos rat snakes are nocturnal snakes so are rarely seen, although when they are they are not usually aggressive.

©Rusty Dodson/Shutterstock.com

The majority of snake species can benefit from fans since they mimic the airflow and ventilation seen in nature. Nevertheless, it’s crucial to take into account the natural environment and demands of the snake. 

Although some snake species originate in more humid areas, others are native to desert habitats with little airflow. If you ever plan on owning a pet snake, it’s highly advised to leave ceiling fans off.

How to Get Rid of Snakes in the Attic

The juvenile eastern rat snake has brown to black blotches on a gray background (sometimes yellowish), and a somewhat squared-off snout.

Snakes that live in the attics are usually the climbing snakes, such as the Yellow Rat Snake or the Eastern rat snake. 

©Patrick K. Campbell/Shutterstock.com

Sealing off the opening or breach that is letting snakes into the attic is the initial step toward getting rid of them. This is frequently the space where the soffit joins the shingle roof. Additionally, it can be any region of the eave with an open space, and exposed roof vents or soffit vents are typical snake points for entry.  

When a person goes into the attic, the majority of snakes will leave. They tend to lurk close to the cracks where their dens are located and crawl in as soon as you approach. If you are able to enter the spot in the attic, use this chance to close off the entry point from the inside.

Consider closing up the hole from the exterior of the residence if you want to ensure that the snakes are no longer on the property and your house.  This will trap the snakes within by doing this, enabling safe capture and release.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © iStock.com/RCKeller


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About the Author

Kirstin is a writer at A-Z Animals primarily covering animals, news topics, fun places, and helpful tips. Kirstin has been writing on a variety of topics for over five years. She has her real estate license, along with an associates degree in another field. A resident of Minnesota, Kirstin treats her two cats (Spook and Finlay) like the children they are. She never misses an opportunity to explore a thrift store with a coffee in hand, especially if it’s a cold autumn day!

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