Watch An Otherworldly Looking Turtle Hunt A Goldfish

Written by Kirstin Harrington
Updated: October 19, 2023
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Key Points

  • This particular snapping turtle has eyes on the sides of its head, unlike all other varieties.
  • The entire interaction takes place in a small tank, where the goldfish has no chance to escape.
  • Despite the fact that they are not an endangered species, certain states have put restrictions on taking them from the wild. 

Although most turtles look ancient, the animal you’re about to see looks like it’s straight out of Jurassic Park! Let us introduce you to the alligator snapping turtle. Because of their spiky shells and ape-like appearance, alligator snapping turtles are often compared to dinosaurs. 

From head to tail, their shells have three ridges with sharp points. This particular snapping turtle has eyes on the sides of its head, unlike all other varieties. While it’s difficult to tell what type of turtle is in the video linked below, the alligator snapping species looks the closest. 

By pressing play on the video, you’ll watch one of these prehistoric creatures clamp down on a fresh goldfish dinner. The entire interaction takes place in a small tank, where the goldfish has no chance to escape. Even if it did, the turtle is so sneaky, the fish doesn’t even know what happens until it’s too late. 

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Check Out This Fascinating Turtle in the Video Below!

Due to habitat destruction and overexploitation of their flesh, alligator snapping turtle populations are in decline. Despite the fact that they are not an endangered species, certain states have put restrictions on taking them from the wild. 

Contrary to several urban legends, alligator snapping turtles don’t typically attack humans. However, their formidable jaws can shatter through bone with a bite force of 1,000 pounds, thus they must never be touched in the wild. 

What Do Snapping Turtles Eat

Alligator snapping turtles sometimes prey on smaller snapping turtles.

©Sista Vongjintanaruks/Shutterstock.com

Alligator Snapping Turtle Facts

Male alligator snapping turtles can weigh up to 200 pounds and have a carapace length of up to 31 inches, despite the fact that the animal in the video is relatively small. Since they spend so much of their time in the water, alligator snapping turtles are primarily aquatic animals. 

Before they need to emerge for air, they may stay underwater for 40 to 50 minutes. The majority of alligator snapping turtles’ diets consist of meat. In addition to eating fish and other water creatures, they have also been observed to consume some plants and small mammals. 

Alligator snapping turtles may spend 50 minutes underwater before coming up for air.

©iStock.com/Jacob Stock

These turtles will scrounge or forage for food at night when they are most active. These ambush predators remain still in the water while hunting and expose the worm-like attachment on their tongues to entice unaware victims.

Goldfish will swell their guts with water when they see danger. Even though this turtle is moving slowly, the fish is unaware of his presence. Sharp spikes that coat goldfish’s bodies are exposed as a result. They become less appealing to catch as a result of predators. Tetrodotoxins, which are extremely dangerous compounds, are found in their skin and several of their internal organs.

Other Amazing Animal Videos You May Enjoy

Ever fished for gator? Watch as this Australian tour guide teases Dominator, a saltwater crocodile who holds the record as the second-largest croc currently in existence. He dangles an appetizing chunk of meat attached to a string on a bamboo pole. Just as Dominator gets close enough to attain it, he lifts the meat out of the way.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © Sista Vongjintanaruks/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Kirstin is a writer at A-Z Animals primarily covering animals, news topics, fun places, and helpful tips. Kirstin has been writing on a variety of topics for over five years. She has her real estate license, along with an associates degree in another field. A resident of Minnesota, Kirstin treats her two cats (Spook and Finlay) like the children they are. She never misses an opportunity to explore a thrift store with a coffee in hand, especially if it’s a cold autumn day!

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