Watch The World’s Fastest Shark Explode Out Of The Water And Snag A Juicy Fish

Written by Kirstin Harrington
Updated: October 19, 2023
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Key Points

  • The shortfin mako is the world’s fastest fish and the fastest shark, reaching top speeds of 45 miles per hour.
  • During hunting, it is recognized for its amazing jumping prowess and has been seen to leap extremely high out of the water.
  • The shark approaches the target vertically, paralyzes it by nipping its caudal peduncle, and starts tearing off bits of flesh before the victim notices it moving around.

A team of marine biologists and a crew from the Discovery Channel set out to prove that Mako sharks will fly out of the water to ambush their prey. The 12-foot-long, at least 1200-pound shortfin mako shark is a sizable, predatory shark that inhabits open ocean waters. 

Witness the Monstrous Mako Below

The shortfin mako is the world’s fastest fish and the fastest shark, reaching top speeds of 45 miles per hour. The athleticism of this species extends beyond its swimming abilities. During hunting, it is recognized for its amazing jumping prowess and has been seen to leap extremely high out of the water.

Luckily, the filming crew had their cameras rolling when one of these beautiful sharks lept from the water to catch a tasty treat. You can hear everyone on the boat cheering when they just captured an unforgettable sight! 

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All temperate waters across the world are home to this shark, though the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans as well as the Red Sea and the Mediterranean have higher concentrations. The Pacific Ocean is primarily found in the region between the Territory of Primorye in Russia and New Zealand and Australia, mostly along the coasts of North America. 

It can be found from East Africa to Hawaii in the Indo-Pacific, from the Gulf of Maine to Argentina and Brazil in the Atlantic, and from Norway to South Africa in the Southern Ocean.

More About the Mako Shark

It consumes a variety of fish species because it is a skilled hunter and a carnivore, but the bluefish, which makes up over 92% of its diet in the populations that reside in the Atlantic, is unquestionably their favorite. The mako shark recognizes its target and remains beneath it while hunting

A diver swimming with a Shortfin mako shark. These sharks are aggressive predators and should be avoided if possible.

A diver swimming with a Shortfin mako shark. These

sharks

are aggressive predators and should be avoided if possible.

©wildestanimal/Shutterstock.com

The shark approaches the target vertically, paralyzes it by nipping its caudal peduncle, and starts tearing off bits of flesh before the victim notices it moving around. The mako is the ocean’s fastest shark. It can travel up to 34 miles in a single day and has a top speed of 20 miles per hour with bursts of 45 miles per hour. As a result, it shows the characteristics of a migratory species.

To catch quick-moving seals and otters, great white sharks are reported to surge out of the water, or breach. It turns out that lazy basking sharks can leap out of the water just as high and swim as quickly as great whites if they so desire. 

The photo featured at the top of this post is © Xavier ELIAS Photography/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Kirstin is a writer at A-Z Animals primarily covering animals, news topics, fun places, and helpful tips. Kirstin has been writing on a variety of topics for over five years. She has her real estate license, along with an associates degree in another field. A resident of Minnesota, Kirstin treats her two cats (Spook and Finlay) like the children they are. She never misses an opportunity to explore a thrift store with a coffee in hand, especially if it’s a cold autumn day!

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