Watch This ‘Quiet As A Mouse’ Lion Execute The Perfect Covert Attack On A Buffalo

Written by Kirstin Harrington
Updated: October 22, 2023
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Key Points

  • Thanks to a video on Maasai Sightings Youtube account, we get to see how lions hunt.
  • Normally, it’s the female lions that do the hunting. It’s shocking how close the lion gets to the buffalo without the horned creature noticing.
  • Before the buffalo can even react, the feline digs its sharp claws into the animal’s back, injuring him immediately.

Watch the Video Below!

The lion’s extraordinary size and power are primarily a result of its social structure. Lions take delight in improving their prospects for achievement and preservation. A pride often includes a few localized males, related females, and their young.  

Each individual contributes much to pride. Females hunt, and they team up to take down big game. While males defend their pride from threats and territorial competitors, cubs acquire life skills like hunting. The power of this united effort enables lions to flourish in their natural habitat.

Because they are dedicated carnivores, lions only eat other living things for food. Lions often hunt and consume antelope, zebra, cattle, warthogs, primates, hippos, and even towering giraffes. 

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When they encounter food, lions will forage for it and devour everything from eggs to small animals. Even fruits and grass can be consumed by lions to enhance their diet, but usually solely to avoid intestinal problems. 

To receive all the nutrients they require, lions also eat their prey’s bones and internal organs. They can maintain their strength and health to defend their pride from enemies and predators. Lions hunt in a most deliberate manner. They will watch possible targets from far away to determine whether it is worthwhile for them to make an attack. 

Lions only eat other living things for food.

©keith hudson/Shutterstock.com

If the animal is big enough and no other apex predators are nearby, it will start creeping closer. The big cats will either charge at their victim or surprise it from behind once they are sufficiently close. 

An Unsuspecting Buffalo

Thanks to a video on Maasai Sightings Youtube account, we get to see how lions hunt. It all starts with a buffalo seemingly relaxing in the savannah. Slowly, a male lion creeps up behind the buffalo.

Two male lions

Lions rarely eat other carnivores as they do not provide the best nutrition

©Maryke Scheun/Shutterstock.com

Normally, it’s the female lions that do the hunting. It’s shocking how close the lion gets to the buffalo without the horned creature noticing. Big cats are extremely large, yet have the stealth of a stalker. 

Before the buffalo can even react, the feline digs its sharp claws into the animal’s back, injuring him immediately. It’s important that buffalos don’t stray away from their herd to prevent incidents like this from happening. 

Had the buffalo been with its herd, the outcome likely would’ve been different. It’s safe to assume that this buffalo in particular was already injured or elderly. The lion is known as one of the most effective predators on land due to the way it hunts. When starting to eat, lions frequently consume bones and horns in addition to the usual huge portions of meat. 

The volume of food a lion requires to survive varies on its size and age. Typically, adult male lions need up to 17 pounds of meat each day, whereas females only need about 11 pounds.

The photo featured at the top of this post is ©


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About the Author

Kirstin is a writer at A-Z Animals primarily covering animals, news topics, fun places, and helpful tips. Kirstin has been writing on a variety of topics for over five years. She has her real estate license, along with an associates degree in another field. A resident of Minnesota, Kirstin treats her two cats (Spook and Finlay) like the children they are. She never misses an opportunity to explore a thrift store with a coffee in hand, especially if it’s a cold autumn day!

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