Whoodle vs Goldendoodle: What Are The Differences?

Written by Colby Maxwell
Published: July 13, 2022
Image Credit SoySendra/Shutterstock.com
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Poodle mixes have fast become some of the most popular hybrid breeds in the world. You can see “doodle” mixes walking on the street with owners on television, and they seem to have taken over social media as well! Today, we are going to take a look at two extremely similar poodle hybrids, the Whoodle and the Goldendoodle. Although they are similar in many ways, there are still some distinct differences that can make the difference when deciding between them. Let’s compare: Whoodle vs Goldendoodle!

Comparing a Whoodle and a Goldendoodle

Whoodles and Goldendoodles are different in size, appearance, and popularity worldwide.

A-Z-Animals.com

WhoodleGoldendoodle
ParentsCross between a Wheaten Terrier and a poodle.Cross between a golden retriever and a poodle.
Fur type and colorSilky, medium-length fur known for being hypoallergenic. Comes in black, brown, red, silver, grey, and cream.Soft, long fur can come in three types: straight, wavy, and curly. Comes in cream, red, black, gold, apricot, and brown.
SizeWeight: 20-60 lbs, depending on poodle type
Height: 12-20 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 15-80 lbs, depending on poodle type
Height: 17-24 inches
Price$1500-$5000$1500-$5000
PopularityUnlisted#5 in 2021

The 5 main differences between a Whoodle and a Goldendoodle

The main differences between Whoodles and Goldendoodles are that Whoodles are smaller, Goldendoodles are more popular, and they come from different hybrid crosses.

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The Whoodle and Goldendoodle don’t sound like real names for animals, but in fact, they are! Both are hybrid breeds of dogs getting their names from the cross of their parents’ breeds. The Whoodle is a cross between a Wheaten terrier and one of the three types of poodle breeds. Goldendoodles are a cross between golden retrievers and, again, one of the three poodle breeds. As both breeds share the same breed parent on one side, there are some distinct similarities.

Like many hybrids, tracking the exact origins of the first cross can be a bit tough. Still, most details point to the first poodle crossbreed occurring around the 1980s, namely with the Goldendoodle, Labradoodle, and Whoodle. The main reason people were so interested in these crossbreeds is the lower-allergen counts that poodles are known for.

When crossing with a poodle, there are a few things to note. The first is that poodles and their crosses are generally considered “hypoallergenic,” although this isn’t an actual term used by breeders but a marketing one. As the AKC explains, there is no such thing as a totally hypoallergenic dog. Still, poodle crosses have significantly reduced the shedding rate. Additionally, their hair is often soft and silky.

Aside from the similarities, let’s explore some of the things that make Whoodles and Goldendoodles different.

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle: Parents

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle
Crossing a Wheaten terrier and a poodle creates a Whoodle.

thatsmrbio/Shutterstock.com

Whoodles are a genetic cross between the Wheaten terrier and one of three poodle types: standard, mini, and toy. The size of the poodle is often the most important factor when it comes to size, with the standard poodle being the largest. In modern times, true hybrids are less common than when the breed was first established. Essentially, a hybrid can be bred with another hybrid, creating multigenerational crosses. Wheaten terriers are an older breed originating from Ireland and were originally used for herding and guarding livestock.

Goldendoodles are a genetic cross between a golden retriever and one of three poodle types: standard, mini, and toy. As with the Whoodle, the size of the poodle determines the size of the hybrid, with the standard poodle being the largest and the toy being the smallest. As with Wheaten terriers, crossing purebred dogs isn’t the most common way to achieve hybrids, although it is the healthiest. Many Goldendoodles are multigenerational, meaning they are the result of two existing Goldendoodles breeds.

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle: Fur type and color

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle
Goldendoodles have three coat types, straight, wavy, and curly.

everydoghasastory/Shutterstock.com

The Whoodle’s parents have a lot to do with the fur type and color of the resulting hybrid. Generally, Whoodles have soft, silky, and medium-length fur that isn’t prone to shed much. One important factor for their coat is the Wheaten terrier’s lineage, as they come in two coat types: Irish or Heavy (American). Irish coats are silkier and wavier, while American coats are thicker and fuller. Whoodles can come in black, brown, red, silver, grey, and cream.

Goldendoodles are a little less variable in color than Whoodles, although there can be some variances in coat type depending on the parents. Generally, Goldendoodles can be split into three fur types: straight, wavy, and curly. The most common coat type is wavy and is a mixture of the two parents’ hair types. Goldendoodles can come in cream, red, black, gold, apricot, and brown.

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle: Size

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle
Whoodles are generally smaller than Goldendoodles.

Both the Whoodle and Goldendoodle have different sizes depending on the size of the poodle lineage.

Generally, Whoodles are smaller than Goldendoodles of the same poodle type. Most Whoodles weigh between 20-45 lbs, although they can weigh as much as 60 pounds in rare instances. Additionally, they can measure 12-20 inches tall at the shoulder.

Goldendoodles are usually larger than Whoodles and weigh 15-80 lbs, depending on the poodle type. Additionally, they stand 17-24 inches at the shoulder.

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle: Price

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle
Both dogs range from $1500-$5000.

W.H. Photography/Shutterstock.com

The price of either dog can vary considerably depending on location and heritage. Both dog breeds fall into the $1500-$5000 range, although the Whoodle is more likely to be on the lower end of the spectrum. Goldendoodles, especially well-bred ones, can be closer to $5000.

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle: Popularity

Whoodle vs Goldendoodle
Goldendoodles are among the most popular dog breeds in America.

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The Whoodle isn’t nearly as popular as other “doodle” breeds. Currently, little to no data exists on how popular this hybrid is.

The Goldendoodle has fast become one of the most popular dog breeds in the entire world. In fact, they were recently listed as the 5th most popular dog in 2021, skyrocketing around COVID.

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About the Author

Colby is a freelance writer from Charlotte, North Carolina. When he isn't distracted by his backyard birdfeeder, you can find him camping, exploring, and telling everyone around him about what he's recently learned. There's a whole world to learn about and Colby is content to spend his life learning as much as he can about it!

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