10 Types of Split-Cupped Daffodils

'Palmares' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodil
© Kazakov Maksim/Shutterstock.com

Written by Jennifer Haase

Updated: June 7, 2023

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Have you ever heard of a butterfly daffodil? This common name refers to split-cupped daffodils due to the look of their cups. In this case, the daffodil center cups are split and positioned in such a way that they resemble butterfly wings. This cup style also makes split-cupped daffodils seem to flutter like butterflies in the warm spring breeze. So let’s take a closer look at 10 types of split-cupped daffodils with their fluttery beauty! But first, we need to divide split-cupped daffodils into their sub-divisions of collar and papillion varieties. You might prefer one over the other for your home garden, but we bet you’ll love them both!

'Vanilla Peach' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodil

Split-cupped daffodils are also called butterfly daffodils.

©Sergey V Kalyakin/Shutterstock.com

What are split-cupped daffodils?

Split-cupped or split corona daffodils have specific traits identifying them as division #11a and #11b daffodils. Specifically, according to the American Daffodil Society, you’ll recognize split-cupped daffodils by the following characteristics:

Split-Cupped Collar Daffodils (Daffodil Division #11a):

  • Has a split cup (corona) with segments placed opposite the flower petals (perianth segments)
  • The segments of the split cup also connect in two whorls of three

Split-Cupped Papillion Daffodils (Daffodil Division #11b):

  • Has a split cup (corona) with segments placed in an alternate pattern compared to the flower petals (perianth segments)
  • The segments of the split cup also connect in one whorl of six

Note: The whorl of a daffodil refers to the ray-like placement of the flower’s parts, all starting from the same point on the plant.

Other names for split-cupped daffodils include:

  • Split-corona daffodils
  • Split-collar daffodils
  • Split-cup daffodils
  • Butterfly daffodils
'Orangery' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodil

A split-cupped collar daffodil has a frilly cup with multiple split segments.

©Tony Baggett/Shutterstock.com

Split-Cupped Collar Daffodils (Division #11a)

We’ll begin our list of 10 types of split-cupped daffodils with popular collar varieties. In particular, with their fluttering cup segments floating opposite their petals, collar daffodils are pretty fluffy!

Collar daffodil cups look extra fluffy because there are two sections or whorls, with one appearing to rest on top of the other. These two cup sections also split into three segments that flutter like butterfly wings. In addition, these flowers also attract butterflies and other pollinators.

According to the Royal Horticultural Society, split-cupped collar daffodils also have reflexed (inverted) cup segments. Additionally, this cup style means the split segments lie back loosely against the petals.

The following split-cupped collar daffodil cultivars are so beautiful you might want to plant them all! And there’s one called “Rainbow of Colors’ with cups that change their pastel hues at least three times as the flowers mature.

'Mondragon' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodil

‘Mondragon’ is a type of split-cupped daffodil with yellow petals and an orange cup.

©Sergey V Kalyakin/Shutterstock.com

1. Narcissus ‘Mondragon’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Mondragon’

Common Names: ‘Mondragon’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Mondragon’ split-cupped collar daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Flowering Season: Mid to Late-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: Bright yellow petals with bright orange cups

With its sunny yellow petals behind a blazing orange cup, the ‘Mondragon’ cultivar is a standout daffodil. In addition to its bicolor showiness, ‘Mondragon’ dazzles with symmetrical and sweet-smelling blooms.

This type of split-cupped daffodil has frilly cup segments against slightly pointed petals. The plant grows 18-24 inches tall and produces eye-catching flowers in mid to late spring.

'Orangery' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodils

The ‘Orangery’ split-cupped daffodil blooms in mid to late spring in Zones 3-8.

©Jordan Comley/Shutterstock.com

2. Narcissus ‘Orangery’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Orangery’

Common Names: ‘Orangery’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Orangery’ split-cupped collar daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Flowering Season: Mid to Late-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: White petals with bright orange cups

Another stunning split-cupped collar daffodil popular for home gardens is the ‘Orangery’ cultivar. This lovely bicolor daffodil boasts a vibrant combination of rounded white petals with ruffled orange cups. It’s also a fragrant plant perfect for cut, cottage, and woodland gardens.

‘Orangery’ butterfly daffodil grows an average height of 14-19 inches and blooms in mid to late spring.

'Palmares' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodil

‘Palmares’ is a butterfly daffodil with peachy pink frilly cups.

©Kazakov Maksim/Shutterstock.com

3. Narcissus ‘Palmares’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Palmares’

Common Names: ‘Palmares’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Palmares’ split-cupped collar daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Flowering Season: Mid-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: Soft white petals and peachy pink cups

Check out the ‘Palmares’ cultivar if you want a dreamy split-cupped daffodil with extra elegance. It has super fluffy, frilly blooms, white petals, and peachy pink split cups. Plus, the center of this daffodil’s cup is a faint yellow, adding to its lovely garden charm.

‘Palmares’ blooms in mid-spring and grows 14-18 inches tall.

'Rainbow of Colors' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodil

‘Rainbow of Colors’ daffodil flower cups change from yellow to coral to soft pink as they mature.

©Sergey V Kalyakin/Shutterstock.com

4. Narcissus ‘Rainbow of Colors’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Rainbow of Colors’

Common Names: ‘Rainbow of Colors’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Rainbow of Colors’ split-cupped collar daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Flowering Season: Mid-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: Creamy white petals with cups that change in color from yellow to coral to soft pink

Is the ‘Rainbow of Colors’ cultivar a magic daffodil? It sure seems magical with its changing colors!

This type of split-cupped daffodil has creamy white petals, but its split collar cups turn from yellow to coral and finally to soft pink. So this dramatic mid-spring bloomer is fun to watch as it transforms before your very eyes.

‘Rainbow of Colors’ daffodil grows 16-20 inches tall and performs best in Zones 3-9. This split-collar daffodil also has 4-inch ruffled flowers that provide a sweet scent to the garden.

'Sunnyside Up' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodils

‘Sunnyside Up’ blooms are so fluffy they look like double daffodils, but they are a split-cupped variety.

©Sergey V Kalyakin/Shutterstock.com

5. Narcissus ‘Sunnyside Up’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Sunnyside Up’

Common Names: ‘Sunnyside Up’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Sunnyside Up’ split-cupped collar daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Flowering Season: Mid-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: Soft yellow with hints of cream

Award-winning ‘Sunnyside Up’ daffodils are so full and downy that you might confuse them for double daffodils (division #4). But ‘Sunnyside Up’ is a split-cupped collar daffodil to the core with ultra-ruffly cups. Also, most of the flower is soft yellow, with petals looking more cream-colored near the bottom of the bloom.

An excellent cut flower, the ‘Sunnyside Up’ butterfly daffodil also has a lovely fragrance. And the plants grow about 16-18 inches tall.

'Tiritomba' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodils

The ‘Tiritomba’ split-cupped collar daffodil has cups that change from yellow to tangerine.

©Walter Erhardt/Shutterstock.com

6. Narcissus ‘Tiritomba’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Tiritomba’

Common Names: ‘Tiritomba’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Tiritomba’ split-cupped collar daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Flowering Season: Early to Mid-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: Lemon yellow petals with golden cups that turn tangerine

The bicolor ‘Tiritomba’ butterfly daffodil is another dramatic perennial plant that shines with colorful splendor. Its striking lemony flower petals make its bright tangerine cups above really pop. Moreover, those tangerine cups open in a golden yellow and eventually mature to orange.

Don’t you just love a color-changing flower? We do too!

‘Tiritomba’ plants grow about 26 inches tall. With that ideal height plus its showy 3-4 inch blooms, this cultivar is a top choice for sharing cut daffodils in vases and bouquets.

'Vanilla Peach' Split-Cupped Collar Daffodils

‘Vanilla Peach’ butterfly daffodils have cream white petals with pale peach cups.

©Sergey V Kalyakin/Shutterstock.com

7. Narcissus ‘Vanilla Peach’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Vanilla Peach’

Common Names: ‘Vanilla Peach’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Vanilla Peach’ split-cupped collar daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Flowering Season: Early to Mid-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: White petals with peach split cups

As you might guess from its name, the ‘Vanilla Peach’ daffodil has lovely bicolor blooms with white petals and peach cups. This type of split-cupped daffodil is so elegant and fluttery that it’s a must-have for romantic gardens. So if you daydream of pastel spring flowers with cloud-like petals, this split-collar daffodil is a dream come true.

‘Vanilla Peach’ is also sweet-smelling, grows 14-18 inches tall, and blooms early to mid-spring.

'Trepolo' Split-Cupped Papillion Daffodil

A split-cupped papillion daffodil has a segmented cup in a single whorl of six.

©Kazakov Maksim/Shutterstock.com

Split-Cupped Papillion Daffodils (Division #11b)

Now let’s admire some split-cupped papillion daffodils! Papillion varieties differ from collar varieties of butterfly daffodils in the placement of their split cup segments. Where collar daffodil cup segments sit opposite the perianth segments (petals), papillion cup segments sit in positions alternate to them.

Papillion daffodil cup segments and whorls are also unique compared to collar daffodil varieties. The split-collar daffodil has a cup with six segments in a single whorl (all stemming from the same point on the plant).

These differences between the anatomy of collar vs. papillion split-corona daffodils can be confusing. But they’re much easier to identify when you put both types of daffodils side by side for comparison.

Keep reading for some beloved split-cupped daffodil cultivars proven hardy for home gardens in Zones 3-9.

'Dolly Mollinger' Split-Cupped Papillion Daffodils

The ‘Dolly Mollinger’ split-cupped papillion daffodil produces flowers in mid-spring.

©dior2021/Shutterstock.com

8. Narcissus ‘Dolly Mollinger’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Dolly Mollinger’

Common Names: ‘Dolly Mollinger’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Dolly Mollinger’ split-cupped papillion daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Flowering Season: Mid-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: White petals and bright orange cups with hints of yellow

The ‘Dolly Mollinger’ split-cupped papillion daffodil features bright, showy bicolor blooms. Its ruffled orange cup against bright white petals make this flower a beautiful sight in mid-spring.

‘Dolly Mollinger’ butterfly daffodils grow 1-2 feet high. They’re also heirloom daffodils registered in 1958 and a popular choice for home gardens ever since.

'Sorbet' Split-Cupped Papillion Daffodils

Fluffy ‘Sorbet’ butterfly daffodils have orange and yellow cups against white petals.

©Aleksandr Naumenko/Shutterstock.com

9. Narcissus ‘Sorbet’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Sorbet’

Common Names: ‘Sorbet’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Sorbet’ split-cupped daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Flowering Season: Mid-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: White petals with orange and yellow cups

Though it gets its name from a sweet frozen treat, the ‘Sorbet’ daffodil cups remind us more of pinwheels. But its sorbet-orange center definitely makes this butterfly daffodil a very sweet-looking plant! In addition, its pinwheel-style frilly orange cup is also outlined in yellow against petals of white.

‘Sorbet’ split-cupped daffodils reach 16-18 inches tall and offer up their showy flowers in mid-spring.

'Trepolo' Split-Cupped Papillion Daffodils

Star-shaped cups in bright orange and yellow make ‘Trepolo’ a standout split-cupped daffodil.

©Sergey V Kalyakin/Shutterstock.com

10. Narcissus ‘Trepolo’

Botanical Name: Narcissus ‘Trepolo’

Common Names: ‘Trepolo’ butterfly daffodil, ‘Trepolo’ split-cupped daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Flowering Season: Mid-Spring

Cultivar Flower Colors: White petals and bright yellow-orange split cups

The ‘Trepolo’ cultivar has a unique cup with thin, slightly curled, and deeply split segments in yellow-orange. To put it another way, ‘Trepolo’ center cups look like exotic starfish about to crawl off the creamy white petals below. This papillion split-cupped daffodil also comes with a wonderfully sweet scent.

‘Trepolo’ is a hardy butterfly daffodil that grows 12-18 inches tall and blooms in mid-spring.

'Goblet' Trumpet Daffodil

The ‘Goblet’ bicolor cultivar is a division #1 trumpet daffodil.

©Walter Erhardt/Shutterstock.com

What are all the daffodil divisions?

So you’ve fallen in love with split-cupped daffodils but wonder what other varieties are available. You’re in luck because there are 13 daffodil divisions to choose from! Check out the list below of the divisions used to categorize daffodils worldwide by plant and gardening organizations.

Split-Cupped Daffodil

Their fluttery center cups give split-cupped daffodils a likeness to butterfly wings.

©shao tong yang/Shutterstock.com

Split-Cupped Daffodils Are Butterfly-Like Beauties

Whether as collar or papillion varieties, split-cupped daffodils have unique frilly cups that make us think of fluttering butterflies. So their common name of butterfly daffodils fits them perfectly! Many of these divine daffodils are also bicolor, though some change color several times as the flowers mature. Those are compelling reasons to plant multiple types of split-cupped daffodils in your garden for fluttery spring blooms!


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About the Author

Jennifer Haase is a writer at A-Z Animals where her primary focus is on plants, pets, and places of interest. Jennifer has been writing professionally about plants and animals for over 14 years. A resident of Nebraska, Jennifer enjoys gardening, floral design, nutrition studies, and being a cat mama.

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