Discover the 5 Most Beautiful Roses That Grow in Virginia

Written by Angie Menjivar
Updated: August 22, 2023
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Roses have a way of reminding you that beauty is uninterruptible, even when the seasons change, and bright colors go dormant. As the clock ticks and days start to get longer in Virginia, there is revitalization that spreads across the state like fairy dust, bringing everything wild back to life with bursts of bright colors.

Though there are tons of flowers native to Virginia like the New England aster, which boasts clusters of purple petals and the tickseed sunflower, which blooms proudly with open yellow petals, there is something about roses that remains ever-alluring. They’re some of the oldest flowers, dating back millions of years, they’re edible, and their fragrances are so intoxicating, we bottle them and use them as perfume. They are so craved; people have paid millions for rare rose cultivars, and many don’t hesitate to pull out their wallets at a florist shop when thinking of a special someone. But which are the most beautiful roses that grow in Virginia?

The 5 Most Beautiful Roses That Grow in Virginia

1. Virginia Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa virginiana

Rose - Flower, Beauty, Beauty In Nature, Blossom, Botany

The Virginia rose blooms in midsummer, and the flowers last unusually long.

©iStock.com/Vincent Ryan

The Virginia rose is also known as the prairie rose or common wild rose and is found in different environments, from sand dunes to wetlands. It’s a woody perennial that’s native to the eastern portion of North America. It’s part of the rose family as a suckering shrub and grows quite tall, sometimes up to six feet. These roses grace gardens beautifully. The flowers are pink (with a bright yellow center), opening fully as if greeting you with open arms during summer season (June through August). Don’t get too close, however. The stems are littered with prickles shaped like hooks. These roses do best with full sun and acidic, well-drained soil. They take well to transplanting as it’s an adaptable species. These roses make wonderful additions to your garden not just for their radiant beauty but also because they are a source of food for wildlife.

2. Sexy Rexy

Scientific Name: Floribunda Rose

Sexy Rexy Rose

These flowers are light pink, soft and silky to the touch.

©Malle/Shutterstock.com

Sexy Rexy flowers have an attention-grabbing name and when you see them, you understand why. These floriferous roses are full-bodied, with cupped clusters and a barely-there scent. The flowers are light pink, soft and silky to the touch. They measure about three inches across and are tightly packed with up to 40 petals on a single rose. From the start of spring through the end of fall, Sexy Rexy roses are on full display for all to see. They stand at four or five feet tall and flourish in full sun with fertile, well-drained soil. Though compact, these small shrubs are bushy — they’re best placed as flowering hedges.

3. Altissimo Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa Altissimo

Altissimo Rose

Each single rose sits atop a long, prickly stem decorated with oversized, dark leaves that sit like an expensive shawl worn in the cold.

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The Altissimo rose goes by several names, including rose ‘delmur’ and rose ‘altus.’ This is a climbing rose with dazzling blood-red flowers that celebrates singlehood and is quite resilient. These lone flowers are about five inches across, and their stamens are a deep golden-yellow. The flowers start producing in the early part of summer and bloom continuously. Each single rose sits atop a long, prickly stem decorated with oversized, dark leaves that sit like an expensive shawl worn in the cold. This is a great choice to set up along a fence or wall, just be sure to support and train these roses as needed to keep them climbing.

4. Damask Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa × damascene

Damask Rose.

This rose hybrid doesn’t just look beautiful in garden, it has plenty of other uses.

©NOPPHARAT9889/Shutterstock.com

Damask roses have a strong fragrance often used to make essential oils and rose water. These roses bloom only once during the summer season. They are very disease resistant and are held erect by thorny stems. They grow tall, up to seven feet. Their colors differ, with subtle soft whites and light pinks common as well as more prominent colors like deep red. This rose hybrid doesn’t just look beautiful in garden, it has plenty of other uses. The dried flowers are used as flavor and laxative agents and the fruits that resemble berries just under the petals are coveted for their rich vitamin content.

5. The Fairy Rose

Scientific Name: polyantha rose

The Fairy rose is a lovely option for compact garden spaces.

When these roses blossom, their fragrance emanates mildly, reminiscent of an apple orchard.

©Marina Rose/Shutterstock.com

The fairy rose is a small shrub rose that has delicate pink flowers with petals that cluster together. These shrubs only grow up to four feet tall and each rose is littered with up to 25 petals, creating a busy yet elegant display of light pink flowers. When these roses blossom, their fragrance emanates mildly, reminiscent of an apple orchard. The flowers stand out, contrasting nicely against the backdrop of their sleek, dark green leaves. They start to bloom during the summer season and don’t quit until frost. They prefer full sun or partial sun (they tolerate shade and drought well) and serve beautifully as ground cover. You could also display them in a large group to create a vivid, colorful hedge.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © NOPPHARAT9889/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Angie Menjivar is a writer at A-Z-Animals primarily covering pets, wildlife, and the human spirit. She has 14 years of experience, holds a Bachelor's degree in psychology, and continues her studies into human behavior, working as a copywriter in the mental health space. She resides in North Carolina, where she's fallen in love with thunderstorms and uses them as an excuse to get extra cuddles from her three cats.

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