Husky Lifespan: How Long Do Huskies Live?

Written by Jennifer Gaeng
Updated: October 19, 2022
Image Credit Ambito/Shutterstock.com
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Siberian Husky sitting by bushes with tongue out
Siberian Huskies were once not taken seriously as racing dogs.

Ksenia Raykova/Shutterstock.com

Known for their athleticism, intelligence, and gorgeous looks, the husky is a highly sought-after canine. The husky lifespan differs significantly from that of other dogs of similar weight, which makes them a unique member of the pack, pun intended.

Many factors go into a husky lifespan, including adult size, diet, lifestyle, environment, and the health of their parents. Let’s have a closer look at the details of the husky lifespan below.

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How Long Do Huskies Live?

Gray Dog Breeds
Siberian Huskies have a lifespan of 10-13 years.

Although some Siberian Huskies can live up to 16 years, the average lifespan is 12 to 15 years. In all breeds, including huskies, females live slightly longer than males.

A Siberian Husky named Kody lived in Philadelphia and reached 16 years old. He was profiled in local newspapers before his passing in 2011. Across the Internet there are reports of Siberian Huskies reaching as advanced of ages as 18 or 19 years old, but it’s difficult to verify the age of dogs. Today, the Guinness Book of World Records and other trusted sources have no record for the oldest husky.

Yet, it’s clear that huskies can live to advanced ages when well cared for. Let’s dive into the life stages of a husky and how you can keep your pet living longer!

Husky Life Stages

Siberian Husky playing on a beach.
It’s believed that some Siberian Huskies can reach up to 18 years of age.

Sbolotova/Shutterstock.com

Siberian huskies reach adult size about 12 months. Adult canines are 1-7 years old. After 7 years, your husky is considered a senior dog. As your dog ages, you may need to adjust his nutrition and exercise routine. Because each dog ages differently, you will need to assess your pet’s needs to determine when to start making changes.

Do Huskies Make Good Family Dogs

Siberian Husky running in the snow
The Siberian Husky is well known for its sled pulling.

iStock.com/Nicholas Chase

Siberian Huskies are known for their remarkable agility and vitality, but they’re also known for their stubbornly quirky or dorky dispositions. They’re a wonderful addition to the family. However, this is only applicable to a certain group of individuals and households.

Their intelligence and enthusiasm have a downside. They’re too clever for their own good and enjoy evaluating your patience to see how far they can go.

While training, they can be particularly obstinate and will try to run out an open door if they feel like it. They all have stories of husky owners having to chase their dogs down the street, in their backyards or in their driveways because they left the door open for too long while bringing in groceries.

Siberian Huskies can be difficult to care for, especially if you are new to dog ownership and training. It’s preferable for families with past dog owners who can teach their children how to train their new husky.

What is The Longest Living Husky?

Husky isolated on a white background.

Ambito/Shutterstock.com

There is no official record of the oldest Siberian Husky alive today. Rumors circulating on the internet suggest that some huskies have lived close to 18 years old. No husky has been reported to live past the age of twenty.

What do Huskies Usually Die From?

A Husky sitting on a rock.

Kateryna Orlova/Shutterstock.com

When it comes to senior dogs, cancer is the leading cause of mortality. All breeds, including Siberian Husky, have their own set of genetic ailments, such as visual problems like cataracts, bleeding disorders, epilepsy, and high blood pressure. This breed is susceptible to degenerative myelopathy, skin infections, and hypothyroidism, as well.

How to Keep Your Husky Healthy so They Can Live a Longer Life

Siberian Husky laying on floor after being brushed
Huskys typically shed their undercoat twice a year.

iStock.com/Inna Dodor

To help your Siberian Husky live longer, here is a comprehensive list of simple things you can do.

Regular Vet Checkups and Vaccines

Don’t forget to keep your Siberian Husky up-to-date on his or her immunizations, and schedule regular checkups with your veterinarian.

Parasite Control

Heartworms can kill your dog, therefore a heartworm preventative like Heartgard is essential.

Spaying and Neutering

There are numerous studies that support the concept of getting your female husky spayed, as it has been shown that spayed females live longer.

Keeping An Active Life

Overweight dogs have a life expectancy of 2 to 3 years less than canines in the healthy weight range. For centuries, Siberian huskies were developed to be able to carry big loads across long distances.

If you aren’t physically fit and willing to devote an hour or more each day to working out with your husky, you shouldn’t consider owning one.

Conclusion

Siberian huskies pulling sled
The Siberian Husky is well-known for pulling sleds through deep snow.

travelarium.ph/Shutterstock.com

As many Siberian Huskies can live up to fifteen or even 16 years old, they may be among the longest-living medium-sized breed.

They’re fantastic dogs, but only for the appropriate owner. Make sure to check out a husky rescue or your local rescues if you think a Siberian Husky is a right addition for your family.

You may anticipate your husky to live 12 years or more with proper care, a nutritious diet, and lots of affection.

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Husky isolated
Husky isolated on a white background.
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About the Author

A substantial part of my life has been spent as a writer and artist, with great respect to observing nature with an analytical and metaphysical eye. Upon close investigation, the natural world exposes truths far beyond the obvious. For me, the source of all that we are is embodied in our planet; and the process of writing and creating art around this topic is an attempt to communicate its wonders.

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