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Hermit Crab

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Hermit Crab Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Arthropoda
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Malacostraca
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Decapoda
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Paguroidea
Common Name:
Most widely used name for the species
Hermit Crab
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Paguroidea
Found:Worldwide
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
2-10cm (0.8-4in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
200-500g (7-18oz)
Number of Species:
The total number of recorded species
500
Average Lifespan:1-10 years
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Threatened
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Green, Red, Blue, Yellow, Orange, Brown, Pink, White
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Shell
Favourite Food:Fish
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Coastal waters
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
200
Main Prey:Fish, Worms, Plankton
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Fish, Sharks, Cuttlefish
Special Features:Long body shape and lives in protective shell

Hermit Crab Location

Map of Hermit Crab Locations

Hermit Crab

The hermit crab is a small sized crustacean, that is found in ocean waters worldwide.Despite its snail-like appearance the hermit crab is related to crabs, although they are not that closely related as the hermit crab is not a true crab.

There are more than 500 different species of hermit crab found in marine habitats all around the world. Although hermit crabs do venture into deeper waters,they are more commonly found in coastal waters where there is more food and places to hide.

The hermit crab has a soft under-body which it protects by carrying a shell on its back. The shell of the hermit crab is not its own, but one that belonged to another animal. As hermit crabs grow, they continue to find larger shells to accomodate their increasing size.

Hermit crabs are omnivorous animals that eat pretty much anything they can find in the surrounding water. Small fish and invertebrates including worms, are the most common prey for the hermit crab along with plankton and other food particles in the water.

Due to their small size, hermit crabs have numerous natural predators all around the world, which includes sharks, fish, cuttlefish, squid and octopuses. It is thought that hermit crabs often hide amongst other animals such as sea anemones as a form of natural protection.

After mating, the female hermit crab carries large numbers of eggs in a mass that is attached to her abdomen. The hermit crab larvae hatch into the open ocean in just a few weeks, where they quickly moult exposing the adult hermit crab body underneath.

Hermit Crab Comments

Kenni
"Awesome dudes and gals!"
rupert grint
"i have 4 what can I do to improve that????????????????????????????????????"
hailey
"I have 3 hermit crabs."
Maximums
"Awesome facts "
Kiki
"Very nice fact"
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First Published: 25th January 2010, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 25 Jan 2010]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 25 Jan 2010]
4. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 25 Jan 2010]
5. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 25 Jan 2010]

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