The 11 Most Expensive Meats You Can Eat

Raw veal beef Oxtail Meat on butcher wooden board with cleaver. Dark wooden background. Top view
© Vladimir Mironov/iStock via Getty Images

Written by Nina Phillips

Published: March 18, 2024

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There are plenty of expensive foods in the world like black watermelon, coffee, melons, and mushrooms. While these delicacies are worth trying, the most expensive meats are in a class of their own.

Each meat on this list is unique. They offer amazing flavors, rich textures, and even interesting shapes and colors.

Some meats are expensive because of how little you get per harvest. Others take a long time to reach maturity or are incredibly scarce.

If you want to learn more about the most expensive meats in the world, continue reading below.

11. Gooseneck Barnacles – $125/Pound

Despite looking quite freaky, gooseneck barnacles are actually delicious.

©Ennie/Shutterstock.com

Gooseneck barnacles are also known as percebes. Depending on the demand and risk of the fisherman, the costs can sometimes go as high as $125 a pound.

10. Foie Gras – $150/Pound

Liver pate sandwich, close-up, isolated on white background

The making of foie gras is considered to be quite a cruel practice.

©GSDesign/Shutterstock.com

Foie Gras is a fat liver. It’s made from force-feeding a highly nutritional diet to a duck or goose. This causes their liver to swell and grow several times their normal size.

9. Wagyu Beef -$175/Pound

Any and all cuts of wagyu are said to be delicious.

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Wagyu is a steak that comes directly from Japan. The cows are from an ancient breed that the Japanese people have kept alive and strong. The cows were also fed a rich diet. Their genetics, the care of these cows, and their diet lead to rich and buttery meat.

8. Jamon Iberico – $4,500/Leg

To make sure the flavor shines through, it’s served on its own in thin slices.

©sweet marshmallow/Shutterstock.com

Jamon Iberico ham is produced in Spain and Portugal. The ham has a very delicate flavor, with hints of herbs, spices, and acorns. After dry aging for three years, it’s sold at a very expensive price, roughly somewhere around $150 to $250 per pound.

7. Pufferfish – $200/Pound

Pufferfish, though expensive, doesn’t taste great. It’s slightly chewy and fishy.

©Capture_the_moment_with_me/iStock via Getty Images

Japanese pufferfish, also known as fugu, is a delicacy. It’s also incredibly deadly, with an estimated 20 to 40 people dying every year.

6. Ayam Cemani – $2,500/Animal

Pure black chickens are the best, but many of the new breeders offer only partially black individuals.

©Sakss/Shutterstock.com

The ayam cemani is a rare breed of chicken from Java, Indonesia. They’re completely black, from their skin and bones to their feathers. Though the chickens are expensive, as more breeders are coming out, the prices are dropping considerably.

5. Kobe Wagyu – $300/Pound

Kobe beef is said to have a buttery and rich taste.

©hungryworks/iStock via Getty Images

Wagyu is a specific type of cow from Japan. These cows are known for their rich marbling throughout the meat. While wagyu is already a step above most steaks, Kobe wagyu is top of the line. The standards are so strict that only 3,000 to 4,000 heads of cattle come to the market every year.

4. Bluefin Tuna – $585/Pound

The difficulty in transporting and handling bluefin tuna also contributes to its price.

©lunamarina/Shutterstock.com

Bluefin tuna is one of the most expensive meat on the planet. One bluefin sold for over $250,000 during an auction. The ever-increasing popularity of sushi is likely to increase the cost of bluefin tuna over time.

3. Brown-Lipped Abalone – $907/Pound

The brown-lipped abalone is a little different from other mussels because it looks a lot like an ear when it sits on your plate.

©Rattiya Thongdumhyu/Shutterstock.com

Technically, abalone only costs about $227 per pound. However, that includes the weight of the shell, which happens to be most of the catch. If you consider just the meat, you’re looking at $900 per pound.

2. Vintage Cote De Boeuf – $3,200/Steak

The rib steaks (cote de boeuf) being grilled on an open fire

Blonde Aquitaine cows go through very low-stress lives to produce certain hormones from being produced.

©iStock.com/Wirestock

There are a few reasons why this vintage cote de boeuf was so expensive. For one, it came from a rare breed of cow known as Blonde Aquitaine. However, what made this one cut so expensive is that they aged it for 15 years before serving.

1. One-Of-A-Kind Porterhouse Steak -$20,000/Steak

Juicy Beef rump steak from marble beef medium rare with sauce on wooden board, close-up. Selective focus.

This isn’t a steak you’re going to find anywhere else, or ever again.

©Fotoatelie/iStock via Getty Images

This isn’t a steak you can buy anywhere. Wally’s Wine and Spirits at Resorts World in Las Vegas purchased a porterhouse steak that had been dry-aged for 195 days in 2014. Then, they sold the steak for $1,000 per three ounces.

Summary of the Most Expensive Meats You Can Eat

List NumberMeatPrice
11Gooseneck barnacles$124 per pound
10Foie Gras$150 per pound
9Wagyu Beef$175 per pound
8Jamon Iberico$200 per pound
7Pufferfish$200 per pound
6Ayam Cemani$250 per pound
5Kobe Wagyu$300 per pound
4Bluefin Tuna$585 per pound
3Brown-Lipped Abalone$907 per pound
2Vintage Cote De Boeuf$2,133 per pound
1One-Of-A-Kind Porterhouse Steak$5,333 per pound


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About the Author

Nina is a writer at A-Z Animals, FIDIS Travel, and Giant Freakin Robot. Her focus is on wildlife, national parks, and the environment. She has been writing about animals for over three years. Nina holds a Bachelor's in Conservation Biology, which she uses when talking about animals and their natural habitats. In her free time, Nina also enjoys working on writing her novels and short stories. As a resident of Colorado, Nina enjoys getting out in nature, traveling, and watching snow hit the mountains from her enclosed porch.

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