Witness Pure Joy as Kids Release Baby Sea Turtles Back to The Ocean

Baby sea turtles running towards ocean
© Julian Wiskemann/Shutterstock.com

Written by Hannah Crawford

Published: February 5, 2024

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There are few things more joyful than watching life through the eyes of a child. They have this wonderful amazement with everything they do. Anything from successfully tying their own shoes or taking a trip to Disney World. Their happiness is contagious. Well, in the video posted above, not only do we get to witness the pure joy from watching these kids, but we also get to see the happiness these baby sea turtles display in the video below.

Watch the Video Below!

@_rachaelnicolee

Baby sea turtle release 🥺 @Bali Sea Turtle Society (BSTS) 2nd release for 2023 of this endangered species. 180 baby turtles hatched at the conservation and released all together on the same day at sunset. #conservation #seaturtleconservation #bali #fyp

♬ Dandelions (slowed + reverb) – Ruth B. & sped up + slowed

Sea Turtles Released in Indonesia

The short TikTok video shown just above takes us to Indonesia. This is where some baby sea turtles are being released back into the ocean. This video was shared by a TikTok follower of the Bali Sea Turtle Society (BSTS) who was working to get these baby sea turtles released safely. 

Kids Help Release Turtles

As the video starts out, we see several members of BSTS that have buckets full of baby sea turtles on this beach. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “Six species (of sea turtles) are found in U.S. waters, all of which are listed and protected under the Endangered Species Act.” So it is vital that they are able to release these baby sea turtles back into the ocean so that they can continue to reproduce.

In 2023, there were reported to have been 180 baby sea turtles that were hatched at the conservation. And the team is gathered in Indonesia to release them all at the same time.

We see little kids gleefully lined up to assist in this grand adventure. They each get a small container that is filled with a little water and one sea turtle. Then, they all go to the edge of the shoreline. And all of the sea turtles get released together at the same time. This enhances the sea turtles’ opportunity to survive from predators.

What Predators Hunt Sea Turtles?

Large sea turtle resting on coral reef looking up towards the surface with its mouth wide open. Plain dark blue background

Sea turtles can live up to 80 years.

©Aaronejbull87/Shutterstock.com

Mature sea turtles (Chelonioidea) can grow to be anywhere from 550-2,000 pounds. The largest sea turtle on record is the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea). This sea turtle weighs up to 2,000 pounds and reaches up to six feet in length. 

Regardless of their massive size, sea turtles still have predators. Animals such as tiger sharks and killer whales will feast on the adult sea turtles. And predators such as fishes, dogs, seabirds, raccoons, and ghost crabs will feast on sea turtle eggs and young hatchlings. 

As we can see, the threats to their livelihood aren’t just from the water. There are threats from land as well. And while male sea turtles won’t leave the ocean, the females must come up to shore to lay their eggs on the beach. 

The likelihood of survival is much greater if the eggs hatch and go back to the water at the same time. Or, like the instance of the video above, these rescued sea turtles were able to all go back to the ocean in the safety of their numbers. 


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About the Author

Hannah Crawford is a writer at A-Z Animals where she focuses on reptiles, mammals, and locations in Africa. Hannah has been researching and writing about animals and various countries for over eight years. She holds a Bachelors Degree in Communication\Performance Studies from Pensacola Christian College, which she earned in 2015. Hannah is a resident in Florida, and enjoys theatre, poetry, and growing her fish tank.

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