Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle: 5 Key Differences

Aussiedoodle vs goldendoodle
© IK Photography/Shutterstock.com

Written by August Croft

Updated: September 28, 2023

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Did you know that there are a great number of poodle crossbreeds, including the Aussiedoodle vs goldendoodle? How can you compare and contrast these two dog hybrids, especially when you consider the fact that they share the poodle as one of their common parents?

In this article, we will compare and contrast everything you need to know about the Aussiedoodle and the goldendoodle. We will address the physical differences between these two dog breeds as well as what they were originally bred for and how they behave in the home as pets. Let’s get started and learn all about these two beautiful dog breeds now! 

Comparing Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle
While the weights of these two dogs are similar, the average Aussiedoodle grows taller than the average Goldendoodle.
CharacteristicAussiedoodleGoldendoodle
Size25-75 pounds; 15-25 inches25-75 pounds; 12-24 inches
AppearanceShaggy coat found in a variety of colors, similar to the speckling and blotchy patterned coat of the Australian Shepherd. Long curled tail and floppy ears; the skull is wider and not as pointed as a poodle’sFound in a variety of colors, including black, white, copper, cream, apricot, golden, and red. It has the skull and snout shape of a golden retriever, while the fur looks more similar to poodle fur. Ears are shorter and more practical than poodle ears.
Originally Bred ForFamily companionship and a friendly, intelligent watchdogGuide dogs, but now just considered to be a low-shedding breed of dog for families
BehaviorExtremely loyal and friendly, though can herd children and young people. Goofy and intelligentGoofy and laid back unless left alone; very loyal and fairly easy to train, and enjoys being near their people
Lifespan10-13 years12-15 years

Key Differences Between Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle

Goldendoodles have shorter ears compared to the long and floppy ears of the Aussiedoodle.

©everydoghasastory/Shutterstock.com

There are many differences between Aussiedoodles and Goldendoodles. While the weights of these two dogs are similar, the average Aussiedoodle grows taller than the average Goldendoodle. Additionally, Goldendoodles have shorter ears compared to the long and floppy ears of the Aussiedoodle. Finally, the average Aussiedoodle lifespan is much shorter than the average goldendoodle lifespan. 

Let’s discuss all these differences in more detail now. 

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle: Size

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle

Goldendoodles average anywhere from 12 to 24 inches tall, while Aussiedoodles frequently grow anywhere from 15 to 25 inches tall. 

©Steve Bruckmann/Shutterstock.com

There aren’t too many differences between the sizes of the average Aussiedoodle and the sizes of the average goldendoodle. However, you can find both Goldendoodles and Aussiedoodles in a variety of dog breed sizes, as they range in weight from 25 to 75 pounds. This makes both of these dogs breeds versatile and unique in this way. 

However, the average Aussiedoodle grows slightly taller than the average goldendoodle, likely due to its Australian Shepherd ancestry. For example, Goldendoodles average anywhere from 12 to 24 inches tall, while Aussiedoodles frequently grow anywhere from 15 to 25 inches tall. 

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle: Appearance

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle

Both of these dogs are found in a variety of colors, though the Aussiedoodle has speckling and markings that resemble the Australian Shepherd, while goldendoodles are typically one solid color. 

©Rena Schild/Shutterstock.com

Goldendoodles and Aussiedoodles have extremely unique coats, but the coat of the Aussiedoodle is shaggier in appearance than the coat of the goldendoodle. Both of these dogs are found in a variety of colors, though the Aussiedoodle has speckling and markings that resemble the Australian Shepherd, while Goldendoodles are typically one solid color. 

You can typically tell an Aussiedoodle apart from a goldendoodle based on the ears. For example, Aussiedoodles have long and floppy ears, while the ears of the goldendoodle are more practical and shorter in length. Aussiedoodles also have long and fluffy tails compared to the shorter tails of the goldendoodle. 

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle: Original Reason for Breeding

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle

Goldendoodles were originally bred for guide dog and seeing eye dog uses, while Aussiedoodles were only bred to create a new domesticated dog for families around the world.

©Steve Bruckmann/Shutterstock.com

Both Aussiedoodles and goldendoodles were bred with poodle crossbreeds in mind, but that doesn’t mean that they were bred for the same reason. For example, goldendoodles were originally bred as guide dogs and seeing eye dog uses, while Aussiedoodles were only bred to create a new domesticated dog for families around the world. 

However, goldendoodles are considered extremely similar to Aussiedoodles for their uses at this point in time. Both dog breeds are hypoallergenic and do not shed, given their poodle ancestry. They are ideal family pets and extremely intelligent, which is the primary reason that they are bred today. 

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle: Behavior

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle

Aussiedoodles tend to herd young children or family members given their Australian Shepherd background, and this behavior is not observed in goldendoodles.

©SoySendra/Shutterstock.com

There are some behavioral differences between goldendoodles and Aussiedoodles, given their related dog breeds. For example, goldendoodles are more laid-back compared to Aussiedoodles due to their golden retriever ancestry. Aussiedoodles tend to herd young children or family members given their Australian Shepherd background, and this behavior is not observed in goldendoodles. 

Both of these dog breeds are regarded as extremely intelligent individuals, but Aussiedoodles are known for their intuitive ability with their owners, while goldendoodles have more of a laid-back attitude overall.  No matter what, these dog breeds are easy to train and adapt well to life in a variety of home situations and family units. 

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle Lifespan

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle

Goldendoodles live an average of 12 to 15 years, while Aussiedoodles live anywhere from 10 to 13 years.

©Peggy McClure/Shutterstock.com

A final difference between Aussiedoodles and goldendoodles is their average lifespan. Goldendoodles outlive Aussiedoodles by a few years on average, though it is unclear why. It is likely due to the fact that golden retrievers tend to live longer lives than the average Australian Shepherd, but lifespan differs from dog to dog, and the overall health and wellness of the individual differs greatly. 

For example, goldendoodles live an average of 12 to 15 years, while Aussiedoodles live anywhere from 10 to 13 years. Both of these dogs are extremely healthy breeds, and it is likely their sizes that affect their lifespans the most.

What is an Aussiedoodle?

An Aussiedoodle is a designer dog breed that combines the genes of an Australian Shepherd and a Poodle. The end result is usually a medium-sized dog with energy and intelligence, making them suitable for many lifestyles. They have a wide range of coat colors and textures, from curly to wavy, long, or short coats. They are also called “Aussiepoos” or “Oodles” these dogs are loyal family companions who also make great therapy dogs due to their easy-going nature and intelligence level. Their lovable personalities make them ideal pets for families looking to add some fun to their day-to-day lives!

Poodle (Canis familiaris) - standing on beach
Aussiedodles and Goldendoodles are both 50 percent poodles.

What is a Goldendoodle?

A Goldendoodle is a hybrid breed of dog created by crossing a Golden Retriever and a Poodle. They are known for their intelligence, loyalty, friendly nature, and affectionate demeanor. Goldendoodles tend to be low-shedding dogs compared to other breeds and come in various sizes, such as miniature, medium, and standard. Their non-shedding coat makes them ideal pets for those who suffer from pet allergies or have asthma. They are highly trainable dogs that can excel in agility courses or obedience classes; they also make great playmates for children due to their energy and love of activity. With proper care and training, Goldendoodles make wonderful family companions!

What Haircuts Work Well For Doodles?

Goldendoodle isolated on white.

There are a variety of attractive haircuts that can help your doodle put its best food forward.

©Hannamariah/Shutterstock.com

One distinctive characteristic of doodles is that they are cousins of poodles, who historically have sported very interesting haircuts! The “poodle” in your doodle means your dog will likely have naturally wavy or curly hair. We’ve created a list of some haircut options that may work for your doodle, piggybacking off of those time-tested cuts that poodles have proven are attractive and workable.

  • Dutch Cut (Mohawk) While this cut is a popular choice for poodles who compete in shows, results may vary with your doodle. This classic cut features long hair on the top of the head, while the facial hair is shaved, giving the dog a mohawk look. The sides are left medium–length, while the paws are also shaved. The tail can also sport a pom pom or longer hair (if your doodle’s hair won’t create a pom pom).
  • Lion Cut As the name implies, your doodle will look similar to a lion with this cut, as the neck and wither hair are left long to resemble a lion’s mane, while the legs, back, muzzle, and forehead are cut short. The tail is shaved to the near end, which is left long to give it a pom pom effect.
  • Poodle Cut (Teddy Bear Cut) If your doodle enjoys masquerading as a wild animal, another option besides the lion cut is the teddy bear cut, which is basically a poodle cut. This mid-length haircut showcases the doodle’s natural curls, while its face is cut to look rounded, and its paw hair is left longer to mimic bear paws. A pom pom tail is an option with this popular cut.
  • Lamb Cut This cut conjures domestic tranquility, as your doodle will look like a sweet lamb. While the body hair is cut short, the legs are cut to a medium length. The head, feet, and tail can be tailored to the owner’s preference.
  • Short Cut Not only is this cut one of the most popular for most doodle owners, but it is also low maintenance. Doodles with naturally short hair do well with this cut, where all the body hair is cut short, hair on the ears is left longer, and the face and paws are shaved.
  • Puppy Cut This hairstyle is popular for multiple dog breeds. The dog’s body hair is cut short, but the facial hair is left longer. This cut is fairly low-maintenance, but you’ll need to give your doodle regular brushing.
  • Summer Cut When the summer heat turns up, this haircut can help your doodle stay cool. All the hair is cut very short except for pom poms on the legs and a tufted or pom pom tail.

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About the Author

August Croft is a writer at A-Z Animals where their primary focus is on astrology, symbolism, and gardening. August has been writing a variety of content for over 4 years and holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Theater from Southern Oregon University, which they earned in 2014. They are currently working toward a professional certification in astrology and chart reading. A resident of Oregon, August enjoys playwriting, craft beer, and cooking seasonal recipes for their friends and high school sweetheart.

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