10 Best Types of Snow Dogs

Written by Amber LaRock
Updated: March 11, 2023
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Key Points

  • The Alaskan Malamute is the ultimate snow-loving dog. Their love of cold weather is a part of who they are. Everything from their thick coat to their body weight is designed to withstand the cold.
  • Saint Bernards are one of the most common dogs utilized in winter rescue missions.
  • The best snow dogs come in all shapes and sizes from all different corners of the world.

10. Keeshond

Keeshond standing among flowers

The stunning keeshond’s coat looks similar to a

Pomeranian

‘s.

©Doczahi/Shutterstock.com

The keeshond is one of the smaller snow dogs on our list. They are striking, with their unique coat. Their fur is similar to that of a Pomeranian’s, but it is denser and plush. This coat quality helps them withstand freezing temperatures. They play easily in the snow, and their coat serves as a thick winter jacket,

The keeshond typically weighs between 35 to 40 pounds, and they are often about 1.5 feet tall. They are great companion dogs, and they especially love being around children and other pets. If you’re looking for a kid-friendly snow dog, this breed should be at the top of the list!

9. American Eskimo Dog

The striking American

Eskimo dog

blends into the snow.

©Robert Southworth / CC BY-SA 3.0 – License

Another petit snow dog on our list is the American Eskimo dog. With their stunning white coat, they blend in beautifully with the snow. These canine friends really become one with the winter weather! Their dark brown eyes stand out against their white coat, which is just one of the stunning features of this special pup. Just like their keeshond friends, their small size does not hold them back from being an energetic, snow loving pup!

The American Eskimo dog can weigh up to 25 pounds and reach up to 19 inches in height. What they lack in inches, they make up for in adorable personality. This winter dog is downright goofy! All this playful energy requires a minimum of 30 minutes of exercise each day. If you can offer this much needed exercise, they will make a wonderful companion for a family.

8. Tibetan Terrier

Tibetan terrier playing with a ball

Tibetan terriers have round and fluffy feet resembling snowshoes, proving just how winter-proof these adorable dogs truly are.

©Fotokostic/Shutterstock.com

The last small breed canine on our list is the Tibetan terrier! As their name suggests, this breed originated in the snowcapped mountains of Tibet. Not surprisingly, they thrive in a cold setting. Some even say their round and fluffy feet resemble snowshoes, proving just how winter-proof this adorable dog truly is. Not only are their paws prepared to wade through snow, but their thick coat helps them withstand frigid temperatures for long periods.

This snow-centric pup typically weighs anywhere from 21-24 pounds and can reach up to 16 inches in height. They make great canine companions and are incredibly friendly and affectionate. However, this pup has a tendency to experience separation anxiety if left alone too often. Before choosing this breed, know you can offer them the daily care they need!

7. Great Pyrenees

Great Pyrenees laying in front of tree with white buds

The

great Pyrenees

is one massive canine friend!

©iStock.com/JZHunt

The great Pyrenees is as majestic as they come. Their long and thick white fur gives them a polar bear-like appearance. And their cute, soft faces resemble teddy bears! Thick double coats make them suited for cold weather and snow. If given the chance, the great Pyrenees will spend hours hopping through the snow!

As we mentioned above, this breed is a huge furry friend. They can weigh anywhere from 80 to 150 pounds and can reach heights of 32 inches. With their giant size and thick coats, they can plow through the snow during any winter storm. Just know that no matter how powerful they may be, they are still just gentle giants at heart.

6. Newfoundland

Black Newfoundland dog in flowers

They may look intimidating, but

Newfoundland

dogs are known for their sweet nature.

©Pandas/Shutterstock.com

Similar to the great Pyrenees, the Newfoundland dog is yet another massive teddy bear. This breed is originally from Canada, so they do well in frigid temperatures. Because they were originally bred for search and rescue in icy water, this may be the best suited snow pup on our list!

This hound may have been bred for serious work, but Newfoundland dogs are fun-loving, goofy pups. They have a sweet disposition and love their family. Just know that they can reach up to 120 pounds!

5. Saint Bernard

12 Animals of Christmas From Around the World - saint bernard

Saint Bernards are the perfect dogs for snow and rescue training.

©Rita_Kochmarjova/Shutterstock.com

The Saint Bernard not only loves snow, but they were actually made for it! Named after the St. Bernard pass in the Swiss Alps, an affinity for cold weather is in their nature. Their origin led them to be the perfect dog for snow and rescue training. In fact, they are now one of the most common dogs utilized in winter rescue missions. They are great for the job due to their thick coat and tolerance of cold weather. And their love of cold temperatures allows them to stay motivated for long periods.

If you ever watched the movie Beethoven, then you know just how big the Saint Bernard can get. Saint Bernards reach up to 180 pounds, so they are truly bulldozers in the snow! At the end of the day, they are one of the most dedicated snow dogs on this list.

4. Labrador Retriever

Labrador retriever

The

Labrador retriever

loves nothing more than playing in the snow with family.

©Jagodka/Shutterstock.com

The Labrador retriever is the ultimate family dog. But did you know they love the snow? They don’t have long fur like others on this list, but their thick double coat keeps them warm. If you want a lovable snow day companion, then the Labrador retriever is the perfect pup for the job.

The Labrador is a large breed, but they are not as big as the other large breeds we’ve mentioned. The Labrador often weighs anywhere from 50 to 80 pounds and can reach heights of up to 24 inches. If you want a family dog to take on your winter adventures, then the Lab is a great pick.

3. Bernese Mountain Dog

Bernese Mountain dogs are originally from Switzerland, and they were first bred to haul carts for their humans in the winter.

©DragoNika/Shutterstock.com

The Bernese Mountain dog is another pup that originated from arctic climates. Originally from Switzerland, they were first bred to haul carts in the winter. With their powerful statures and thick coats, they were able to withstand long winter days outdoors. Since Swiss winters are full of snow, any dog created for this winter job has to absolutely love the snow.

Bernese Mountain dogs are known for being affectionate, but they are also very intelligent. They need both mental and physical stimulation each day to be fulfilled. You will need to be an involved dog owner if you want to own a Bernese Mountain dog.

2. Siberian Husky

taste of the wild guide

Huskies are used as sled dogs. A love of cold weather is ingrained in their DNA!

©Sbolotova/Shutterstock.com

When asked to think of the first snow-loving dog that comes to mind, many will say the Siberian husky. They come from the freezing climate of Siberia and have been withstanding frigid temperatures for hundreds of years. They are sled dogs to this day and are the main focus of many other winter sports!

The Siberian husky is typically a medium to large sized dog, as they weigh anywhere from 35 to 60 pounds. Huskies love the snow so much that many owners say it is hard to get them to come inside! It is not uncommon for a husky to curl up in the snow and take a nap. A love of cold weather is ingrained in their DNA!

1. Alaskan Malamute

Alaskan malamute walking in the snow

This artic pup came from the frigid country of Alaska, where it is known to drop below -30 degrees regularly in the winter.

©iStock.com/Liliya Kulianionak

The number one snow-loving dog on this list is the Alaskan Malamute. This artic pup came from the frigid country of Alaska, where it regularly drops below -30 degrees in the winter. The Alaskan malamute was originally bred to transport freight for their owners as sled dogs. This breed is the ultimate snow dog, and their love of winter resides deep in their hearts.

Some confuse the Alaskan Malamute for the Siberian husky, but these dogs are much larger than their husky cousins. While most huskies do not exceed 60 pounds, the Alaskan Malamute weighs up to 100 pounds. They also stand about 6-8 inches taller than most huskies. Their extra mass and weight help them withstand cold weather for longer periods. It’s easy to understand why they are the number one snow dog on this list!

Summary

Many dogs love the snow, but some dogs were simply meant for winter weather. If you are looking to adopt a snow-adoring pup, then look no further than the pups on this list!

The photo featured at the top of this post is © travelarium.ph/Shutterstock.com

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About the Author

Amber LaRock is a writer at A-Z Animals primarily covering topics surrounding pet health and behavior. Amber is a Licensed Veterinary Technician with 12 years of experience in the field, and she holds a degree in veterinary technology that she earned in 2015. A resident of Chiang Mai, Thailand, Amber enjoys volunteering with animal rescues, reading, and taking care of her two cats.

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