Crocodile Meat: The Benefits and Risks of Eating This Exotic Meat

Written by Kirstin Harrington
Updated: July 18, 2023
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If you’re tired of pork, chicken, seafood, and beef, consider eating crocodile meat. Many people have reported this apex predator tasting like salty chicken. If you do want to try eating this reptile, there are important things you’ll want to know. 

Crocodile meat is technically edible and many people, particularly in southern states, eat it regularly. Just like with any food you’re trying for the first time, there are pros and cons to consider. Let’s take a look at everything you need to know becoming consuming some croc! 

Benefits of Eating Crocodile Meat

1. Crocodile Meat is Protein Dense

Protein-dense diets help people gain muscle and shed fat.

©Digital Storm/Shutterstock.com

If you’re trying to gain muscle or lose fat, eating plenty of protein is vital. High levels of protein in crocodile meat are crucial for growing strong muscles. According to the Health Promotion Board, a 100-gram portion of this type of meat includes 46 grams of protein. More protein is in crocodile meat than in the same amount of chicken. 

2. Your Dog Can Eat It! 

Cute dog puppy eating chicken neck - 8 weeks old - jack Russell terrier hound doggy

Make sure to take out the bones when serving crocodile to your dog.

©iStock.com/K_Thalhofer

Dogs can consume crocodile meat without any ill effects. Because of its high vitamin and mineral amounts, lean meat which is packed with protein, and low cholesterol, is highly beneficial to dogs too! 

Crocodile is one of the healthiest meats for dogs. It is good for an extended maintenance diet since it works well for dietary trials and elimination diets. Many vets consider it a superfood for man’s best friend! 

3. It’s Heart-Healthy

puzzle heart

With less cholesterol than meats like pork or beef, crocodile meat is better for your heart than those options.

©nito/Shutterstock.com

Crocodile meat has less cholesterol than meats like beef and pork, which are other popular kinds of meat. For those who struggle with excessive cholesterol levels, eating crocodile meat may be a good option. 

Only 23 milligrams of cholesterol are present in a serving of 300 grams of crocodile. The protein and amino acid content can shield you against heart disease. Additionally, potassium, which is essential for maintaining heart health, is found in crocodile meat.

4. It’s Unique from Alligator Meat

Alligator feeding in alligator theme park

Just as crocodiles and alligators are completely different animals, their meat are different, too.

©Orhan Cam/Shutterstock.com

Alligators and crocodiles are both members of the crocodilian family. Both of their meats are white, have a lot of protein, and are low in fat. Along with tasting like chicken meat, both of them have almost the same amounts of vitamins and minerals. 

Considering their many similarities, the salt and cholesterol contents of crocodile and alligator meat are slightly different. It is well known that alligator meat contains more sodium and less cholesterol than crocodile meat. 

5. Crocodile Meat Can Prevent Asthma and Diabetes

asthma inhaler

Eating crocodile meat can help with asthma.

©Rybalchenko Nadezhda/Shutterstock.com

Protein and amino acids included in crocodile meat can safeguard the functioning of organs, especially that of the pancreas. The primary organ responsible for producing the hormone insulin, which is crucial for regulating blood sugar levels, is the pancreas. 

The majority of diabetics are insulin deficient or insulin resistant. It is thought that the majority of reptile meat, including crocodile, helps treat asthma. Asthma is an allergy that affects the respiratory system. To treat asthma, cultures in Chinca once used crocodile meat with natural remedies like ginseng.

6. Crocodile Oil Can Be Beneficial

Camphor Oil

Crocodile oil can be applied topically or consumed in a dish.

©Monrudee/Shutterstock.com

Undoubtedly, our bodies require oil to maintain soft, moist skin. Chinese and others in Southeast Asia highly value crocodile oil thanks to its amazing benefits. Traditional medicine has a long history of using crocodile oil to treat burns. 

Because it is rich in beneficial fatty acids, such as oleic, linoleic, and palmitoleic acids, crocodile oil is often applied topically. It’s beneficial because it improves collagen synthesis and skin structure. Crocodile oils have also been used for hair growth, stretch mark healing, skin whitening, and moisturizing. 

Disadvantages of Eating Crocodile Meat

portrait of tired sick exhausted woman, beautiful girl is suffering from hot Summer heat stroke, sunshine, hot weather day, sweaty and thirsty, high temperature. Feeling unwell, unhealthy

If bacteria contaminates crocodile meat, it can cause food poisoning, as any meat can.

©EugeneEdge/Shutterstock.com

Possibility of Food Poisoning

Like with any meat, there is a possibility for bacteria to contaminate the meat before and during the cooking process. The majority of reptiles, especially crocodiles have salmonella in their stomachs. While processing, the meat may pick up germs. 

People who have bacterial infections can develop illnesses like typhoid, acute food poisoning, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Before handling the meat to prepare it for consumption, fully cook it and wash both your hands and utensils to prevent cross-contamination.

How to Cook Crocodile Meat

Restaurant Kitchen: Portrait of Asian and Black Female Chefs Preparing Dish, Tasting Food, Doing High-Five in Successful Celebration. Two Professionals Cooking Delicious, Authentic Food, Healthy Meals

Some restaurants serve crocodile on the menu in several forms!

©iStock.com/gorodenkoff

Crocodile meat is completely white and lean. Due to its high protein content, the majority of individuals utilize it to grow their muscles and heal from injuries. The meat’s excellent flavor has also drawn consumers from all around the world. 

Although there are many ways to prepare this low-fat meat, we highlight one of the better methods below. People who make dishes with crocodiles often say to chill the meat for a minimum of 12 hours prior to cooking. 

By doing this, you preserve its flavor and stop it from losing moisture when it thaws. Although the meat is cooked more like fish, it tastes more like chicken. As a result, you should begin by seasoning the crocodile fillet with salt and pepper before frying it for a few minutes on both sides in a nonstick pan. 

For enhanced flavor, we suggest that you substitute butter for the oil and add some lemon juice on top. If you don’t have access to fresh lemon, lemon pepper is always a tasty seasoning. 

The photo featured at the top of this post is © delrigorita/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Kirstin is a writer at A-Z Animals primarily covering animals, news topics, fun places, and helpful tips. Kirstin has been writing on a variety of topics for over five years. She has her real estate license, along with an associates degree in another field. A resident of Minnesota, Kirstin treats her two cats (Spook and Finlay) like the children they are. She never misses an opportunity to explore a thrift store with a coffee in hand, especially if it’s a cold autumn day!

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