Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Canis lupus

Last updated: August 14, 2021
Verified by: AZ Animals Staff

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a favorite breed of Queen Elizabeth II



Pembroke Welsh Corgi Scientific Classification

Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Mammalia
Order
Carnivora
Family
Canidae
Genus
Canis
Scientific Name
Canis lupus

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Conservation Status

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Locations

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Locations

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Facts

Fun Fact
The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a favorite breed of Queen Elizabeth II
Most Distinctive Feature
Low-set body, large erect ears, and stubby tail
Temperament
Affectionate, fun-loving, independent, intelligent
Litter Size
6-8
Diet
Omnivore

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Physical Characteristics

Colour
  • Fawn
  • Red
  • Black
  • White
  • Tan
Skin Type
Hair
Lifespan
12-15
Weight
22-30 lbs
Height
10-12 inches

Pembroke Welsh Corgi as a Pet:

General Health
Energy Level
Shedability
Trainability
Intelligence
Tendency to Chew
Size
Family and kid friendliness
Yappiness / Barking
High
Seperation Anxiety
High
Preferred Temperature
Average climate
Exercise Needs
High
Friendly With Other Dogs
High
Pure bred cost to own
$600 or more for a new puppy
Dog group
Herding
Male weight
22-30 lbs
Female weight
22-28 lbs

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Images

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The name Corgi comes from the combination of two Welsh words: cor for dwarf and gi for dog. According to Welsh lore, these dogs were thought to be originally owned by fairies and elves. As comparative giants, the Corgis helped to pull the tiny carts and carriages of these magical creatures. The patch of darker fur on the back is still sometimes called a fairy’s saddle.

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a famous and iconic purebred herding dog that originated from Pembrokeshire, Wales, perhaps dating as far back as 1000 AD. It first descended from a northern type of dog known as the spitz, which has long, thick fur, pointed ears and muzzles, and a curled tail. At some point in the distant past, people began to select these dogs for the dwarf trait and bred them, giving them their small size.

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The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is characterized by a long body, short legs, a docked or bobbed tail, a triangle-shaped head, and big ears, rounded at the tips. This is complemented with a thick double coat of fur; fawn, red, sable, and black and tan are all accepted colors. But don’t let its small size fool you. This dog was originally bred to herd livestock out in the field. The small size enables it to nip at the animal’s heels to drive it around.

In the home, it’s a loving and friendly companion.

3 pros and cons of owning a Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Pros!Cons!
Affectionate and Playful: The Pembroke is a charming and loving breed for the entire family.Slight Stubborn Streak: The Pembroke has a mind of its own.
Intelligent: It ranks as one of the smartest breeds in the world.Tendency to Nip: The Pembroke has a strong instinct to nip at heels.
Hard-working: The Pembroke was originally bred to herd livestock all day.Separation Anxiety: This dog should not be left alone for very long.
Corgi Close-Up
The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is highly intelligent, very playful, independent, and even a bit stubborn!

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Size and Weight

The purebred Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a small dog. It sits low to the ground on account of its short legs.

Height (Male):10 to 12 inches
Height (Female):10 to 12 inches
Weight (Male):22 to 30 pounds
Weight (Female):22 to 28 pounds

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Common Health Issues

Before deciding to bring home a new dog, it is important to be aware that the breed is at risk of developing several conditions, some of which are the result of its dwarfism trait. Hip dysplasia, caused by a loosening of the hip joint, is particularly common in this breed; beginning as early as four months old, this condition can cause pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. Corgis can also suffer from a nerve issue called degenerative myelopathy, which results in muscle atrophy, decreased muscle mass, and partial or full paralysis.

Other common health problems include progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, cancer, epilepsy, disc problems, and a bleeding/clotting disorder called von Willebrand’s disease. After the dog’s birth, good breeders will routinely check the puppy for common health issues. You should ask the breeder to provide proof of a thorough medical evaluation, particularly for hip and eye problems.

Health and Entertainment for your Pembroke Welsh Corgi

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This breed has a natural lifespan of around 12 to 13 years, though many dogs live even longer than this. In summation, these are the most common health issues with a Pembroke Welsh Corgi:

  • Eye disorders
  • Cancer
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Disc problems

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Temperament

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is an interesting study in contradictions. It is simultaneously fun-loving but hard-working, sensitive but strong, affectionate, and people-oriented. It is also fearless and independent. They have a bit of a “big dog” personality, which makes them well-suited for herding and watchdog duty.

If you’re just looking for a simple companion, then the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a great choice. They are charming, playful, and love to run frantically around the home, getting involved in its owner’s activities. However, be aware that this breed will exhibit signs of separation anxiety if left alone for too long. This will lead to destructive behavior and excessive barking.

How to Take Care of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a good choice for owners with almost any kind of experience level. While they do require quite a bit of time and patience to care for, their high intelligence and affectionate temperament make them a real joy to interact with and train. If you have any other questions or concerns about this breed’s care, then you should talk with your vet or other dog experts.

Food and Diet

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi will probably need around 1 to 1.5 cups of high-quality, high-protein dog food per day. The exact amount will depend on the age, size, and activity level of your dog. Obesity problems can sometimes plague this breed, so you should keep a close watch on the amount of dog food and treats it consumes throughout the day.

Maintenance and Grooming

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi has a rather thick double coat of fur – consisting of a coarse outer coat and a softer undercoat – that sheds quite often, especially during the spring and summer months. It will need daily grooming sessions with a simple slicker brush, sometimes complemented with a rake for the undercoat. When the shedding season approaches, frequent baths should be given to loosen the hair, but brushing should only occur when the dog is dry; blow drying can help the coat dry faster.

Other important aspects of its maintenance include frequent nail trims (to prevent them from clicking on the floor), ear cleaning with a cotton swab, and tooth brushing with a suitable kind of vet-approved paste.

Training

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a smart, capable dog, quick to learn human commands and eager to please its owner. However, don’t expect this breed to follow your every whim. Because of its independent and active mind, the Corgi needs some room to think and act on its own. Positive reinforcement methods and treats should work well with this breed.

Exercise

Despite its small and diminutive size, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a strong and athletic dog with excellent stamina; after all, it was originally bred to herd livestock. It will probably need more than an hour of exercise per day. Walks or jogs, fetching, and general playtime all work well to satisfy its exercise requirements, but if you go too fast, it might not be able to keep up with you on account of its short legs. This breed also excels at all kinds of herding and agility challenges.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Puppies

Pembroke Welsh Corgi puppies will need a lot of early training and care to become well-adjusted adults. Puppies should ideally start socialization around the first eight to 16 weeks of their lives. You should introduce them to plenty of other people, dogs, and unique situations.

If you plan on blow drying the dog’s fur, then it will need to become accustomed to the sound of the drier at an early age. Otherwise, it might be frightened of the loud noise.

By around the six-month mark, the dog will need to learn basic commands and begin housetraining as well. Crate training can help prevent accidents since dogs do not like to soil their sleeping quarters. If you plan to spay or neuter your dog (which has enormous health and behavioral benefits), then you should ideally schedule it before the dog’s first birthday.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Puppy
Pembroke Welsh Corgi Puppy

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi and Children

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is an excellent companion and friend for children of almost all ages. The only caveat is that its barking might disturb younger children in particular. It also has the tendency to nips at heels.

Dogs Similar to the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

If you are a fan of the purebred Pembroke, then you might want to check out these similar breeds:

  • Cardigan Welsh Corgi: Both of the Corgis are very similar in appearance and behavior, but the Cardigan actually predates the Pembroke by some 2,000 years. The main difference is the Cardigan’s longer tail and darker coat color.
  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is not exactly a herding dog, but it does combine the affectionate nature of a toy breed with the athleticism of a working dog. This is a charming, graceful breed with long ears, a short snout, and a rich, silky coat.
  • Australian Cattle Dog: While its legs aren’t quite as short as the Corgi, the Australian Cattle Dog has a compact, muscular body with a blue and red speckled or mottled appearance. It is exceptionally alert, curious, and fun to be around.

Famous Pembroke Welsh Corgi Dogs

Despite its humble origins, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi has become one of the most popular dogs around the world, thanks in part to its small size, quirky personality, and loving nature.

Queen Elizabeth II has owned more than 30 Welsh Corgis over her lifetime. Dookie, given to her by her father, was her first puppy, seemingly instilling a love of the breed in her. Popular horror author Stephen King also owned a Corgi called Molly, whom he jokingly calls “The Thing of Evil.” Another Corgi named Rufus was the original mascot of Amazon.com until his death in 2009. Finally, a fictitious Corgi called Ein was a main character in the Japanese anime Cowboy Bebop.

If you’re still looking for a good Pembroke name, then you might want to consider one of the following popular choices:

  • Winston
  • Cooper
  • Bella
  • Luna
  • Marty
  • Emma
  • Bailey
  • Lily
  • Piper
  • Daisy

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Pembroke Welsh Corgi FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) 

Are Pembroke Welsh Corgis good family dogs?

Yes, the Pembroke is a very loyal and affectionate member of the entire family.

What is the price of a Pembroke Welsh Corgi?

You can expect the price to be anywhere between $600 and $2,000 for a new Corgi puppy from a reputable breeder – and sometimes even more for a dog with a top-tier pedigree. If instead, the price of a new puppy seems a little steep, then you might want to consider adoption. There are plenty of affectionate and well-behaved dogs awaiting good homes in adoption shelters around the country.

Do Pembroke Welsh Corgis bark a lot?

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi does have a reputation as a barker. This can be worked on with proper training, but its natural instinct is to make noise when it’s excited or agitated.

How long do Pembroke Welsh Corgis live?

The typical lifespan of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is around 12 to 13 years. With the combination of good breeding, proper care, and good luck, there is always the chance it will survive longer.

What are some popular Corgi mixed dogs?

Some of the most popular mixes include the Auggie (an Australian Shepherd mix), the Corgipom (a Pomeranian mix), and a Corgi Inu (Shiba Inu mix).

Sources
  1. American Kennel Club, Available here: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/pembroke-welsh-corgi/
  2. American Kennel Club, Available here: https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/lifestyle/fun-facts-about-the-pembroke-welsh-corgi/
  3. The Dog People, Available here: https://www.rover.com/blog/4-common-corgi-health-problems-and-how-to-help/
  4. American Kennel Club, Available here: https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/training/train-corgi-corgi-puppy-training-timeline/

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