The 75 Most Iconic Places Around the World – In Alphabetical Order By Continent!

Written by Jennifer Gaeng
Published: June 17, 2022
Image Credit Chuta Kooanantkul/Shutterstock.com
Share this post on:

Iconic landmarks from around the world will be on our itinerary today! They are well-known for their location, unique architecture, and rich history, regardless of whether they are man-made or natural landmarks. You may find that the following 75 landmarks span all seven continents of our earth, including Antarctica, Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and Australia.

Many people go to these iconic, world-famous places around the world each year to see the wonders they provide as major tourist attractions. Who knows, one of these places might be the next stop for you and your family. To begin checking off some of these incredible locations from your bucket list, let’s get started right now!

Africa

Fish River Canyon, Namibia

One of the most iconic places in the world is the Fish River Canyon in Namibia, Africa’s largest canyon.

iStock.com/R.M. Nunes

Known locally as the Visrivier Canyon, the Fish River Canyon, or Visrivier Kuil, is a Namibian feature. South of the country is where it is. Also, it’s the second most popular tourist destination in Namibia and the continent’s largest canyon. This area features a massive gorge that is up to 550 meters deep, up to 27 kilometers broad and 160 kilometers long.

One of Namibia’s longest rivers, the Fish River, flows across the heart of the country. Before, the plateau was covered in a thick layer of vegetation that is now dry, rocky and protected by a few hardy species that can withstand drought. There are only a few short rapids in late summer when the river is at its widest.

A tent site 70 kilometers north of Ai-ais offers public views. The Ai-Ais/Richtersveld Transborder Park includes this portion of the canyon. The final 90 kilometers of this canyon are privately owned.

Lalibela Rock-Hewn Churches, Ethiopia

The stone-cut Churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia took 24 years to build.

iStock.com/Dmitry_Chulov

The 11 stone-cut Churches of Lalibela are in the Western Ethiopian Highlands near the town of Lalibela. They are named after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of the Zagwe Dynasty, who ordered the huge building project to make Jerusalem into his own kingdom. This place is still used by the Ethiopian Orthodox Christian Church, and many people come here to worship.

These 11 rock churches took 24 years to build. Four of the churches share a wall with the mountain. Seven of the churches stand on their own. The different churches give the site a variety of architectural styles, as seen in the bas-reliefs of Bet Golgotha and the geometric patterns and biblical images of Bet Mariam.

Orthodox Ethiopians care a lot about the churches in Lalibela. Together, they make a spiritual and figurative pilgrimage site that looks like Jerusalem. The property is used for daily worship and prayer, religious festivals like Timkat and Genna, as a home for the clergy and to bring together religious followers and leaders every year.

Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
Mount Kilimanjaro is the highest peak in Africa and an iconic site for walking and mountaineering enthusiasts.

iStock.com/squashedbox

Kilimanjaro, a Tanzanian volcano that no longer erupts, is no longer a threat to climbers. Kibo, Mawenzi and Shira are the three volcanoes that makeup Mount Kilimanjaro’s surface. Mount Kilimanjaro is the highest peak in Africa and the highest mountain above sea level on the globe. It is 5,895 meters (19,341 feet) above sea level and 4,900 meters (16,100 feet) above the plateau’s base. It’s the highest volcano in Africa and the eastern half of the globe, making it a must-see.

In terms of global fame, walking and mountaineering enthusiasts flock to this part of Kilimanjaro National Park because of its accessibility. There are now better roads leading to Kilimanjaro National Park because of the park’s popularity as a tourist destination. Also, Tanzania’s major transportation hub is Kilimanjaro International Airport.

Mount Nyiragongo, Democratic Republic Of The Congo

Another iconic place around the world, Mount Nyiragongo is an active stratovolcano.

iStock.com/GlobalP

The Virunga Mountains, which form part of the Albertine Rift, are home to Mount Nyiragongo, an active stratovolcano. 12 kilometers north of Goma and Lake Kivu, and east of the Rwandan border, sits the Virunga National Park. The main crater is two kilometers wide and has an enormous lava lake

Nyiragongo’s lava lake was once the world’s largest. However, the depth of the lava lake now varies. The lava lake was 3,250 meters (10,660 feet) high and 600 meters (197 feet) deep prior to the January 1977 eruption (2,000 ft). Since then, the lake has been located at an altitude of 3,100 ft (900 meters). Forty percent of Africa’s volcanic eruptions are attributed to Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira.

Pyramids of Giza, Egypt

Pyramids of Giza, Egypt
The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and best-preserved of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

iStock.com/Islam Moawad

Egypt’s largest edifice, the Great Pyramid of Giza, is also the ultimate resting place of Khufu, Pharaoh of Egypt’s Fourth Dynasty. It was built in the 26th century BCE over a period of 27 years, making it the oldest and best-preserved of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. As a part of the Giza pyramid complex, it adjoins modern-day Giza in Egypt’s Greater Cairo.

As one of Egypt’s most popular tourist attractions, the Giza Pyramids attract tens of millions of visitors each year. These amazing pyramids are considered one of the seven wonders of the world and a UNESCO World Heritage Site!

Table Mountain, South Africa

Table Mountain, South Africa
South Africa’s most iconic landmark is Table Mountain.

iStock.com/jacoblund

Table Mountain is the most famous landmark in South Africa. Because of its famous cable car, it is also one of the most photographed places in the country. Table Mountain has become a symbol of Cape Town, and people come from all over the world to see it.

Most places to hike in Table Mountain National Park are free, but there are a few places, like Kirstenbosch Garden, Cape Point and Boulders, where you must pay a conservation fee. Those who are in good shape should be able to get to the top in about an hour. From easy to moderately hard. On the “trail,” which is mostly made up of rocky concrete steps that lead to the top, you can get a lot of exercise!

The Avenue of Baobabs, Madagascar

Madagascar - Baobab trees
The best place is Africa to view the one-of-a-kind baobab trees is the Avenue of the Baobabs.

Vaclav Sebek/Shutterstock.com

In the Menabe area of western Madagascar, between Morondava and Belon’i Tsiribihina, there is a dirt road called “The Avenue of the Baobabs.” This road is lined with baobab trees. Because it’s so easy to get to, it’s also the best place in Africa to see Baobab trees.

On the island of Madagascar, there are many baobab trees, but the most famous row of them is about 40 minutes north of Morondova. If you want to visit the baobabs in Madagascar more than once, it’s easy to get a taxi or rent a car in Morondava.

Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe & Zambia

Victoria Falls, home to rare plants and wildlife, is one of the world’s largest falls.

Eva Mont/Shutterstock.com

Victoria Falls is a waterfall in southern Africa on the Zambezi River. There are many rare plants and animals that live there. It is one of the world’s biggest falls, reaching 1708 meters wide!

The falls can be reached from both Zambia and Zimbabwe. You can get there from either Zimbabwe or Zambia by going to Victoria Falls or Livingstone. Both are easy to get to by air. Zimbabwe used to be the most common way to get into the country, but in the 2000s, political unrest and high inflation made Zambia a better option. Zambia has had one of the most stable and quiet democracies in Africa. Its safari lodges are known for their large number of animals and warm, old-fashioned service.

Antarctica

Mount Erebus, Antarctica

Mount Erebus, Antarctica
The 3,794 meter tall volcano called Mount Erebus is quite the sight to see in Antarctica.

iStock.com/James Moore

It might seem like Antarctica is far away with no landmarks to see there. Mount Erebus, however, is the second-highest volcano in Antarctica after Mount Sidley. It is 3,794 meters tall and was found by Polar explorer James Ross on his way to Antarctica in 1841. Most Antarctic cruises don’t go this far south, but those that do usually stop at Ross Island in the Ross Sea, which is home to Mount Erebus and three other dormant volcanoes, including Mount Terror.

Aside from this impressive mountain, Ross Island is home to a colony of about 500,000 Adelie penguins, which can also be found all over the Antarctic Peninsula!

Asia

Angkor Wat, Cambodia

Angkor Wat is the largest temple complex in the world!

iStock.com/f11photo

Angkor Wat is the largest temple complex in the world. It is made up of a total of 402 acres. In the 12th century, Khmer King Surya Varman II built it as a state temple and tomb for himself. Angkor Wat was built for Vishnu, which was against Shaiva tradition. Angkor Wat is a mix of the temple-mountain style and the galleried temple style. It looks like Hindu mythology’s Mount Meru, which is home to the gods. It has a 3-mile moat, a 2.2-mile outer wall and three tall rectangular galleries. The main part of the temple has five towers. Many people admire the temple’s grandeur, harmony, bas-reliefs and gods.

Angkor Wat, the best-preserved temple on the site, has always been a place of worship. The temple is the best example of Khmer architecture. It’s one of the most important Buddhist pilgrimage sites in Cambodia and the rest of the world because it helped bring Buddhism to Cambodia. It is the most popular place to visit in Cambodia and a national symbol.

Burj Khalifa, Dubai

Burj Khalifa, Dubai
If you want to check out one of the most iconic places in the world in terms of tall buildings, check out the Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

iStock.com/bloodua

As of January 1, 2009, the Burj Khalifa was the world’s tallest building. Taipei 101 had previously held the record for the world’s highest structure. It was renamed the Burj Khalifa by the government of Dubai in 2010.  Just over half a mile tall, the Burj Dubai skyscraper has a total height of 829.8 meters (2,722 feet) and an overall roof height of 828 meters, excluding the antenna.

Gardens by the Bay, Singapore

Gardens by the Bay, Singapore
There are three waterfront gardens that make up Gardens by the Bay.

iStock.com/NanoStockk

The Gardens by the Bay is a 250-acre nature park in the Central Region of Singapore. It is right next to the Marina Reservoir. The Bay South Garden, the Bay East Garden and the Bay Central Garden are the three waterfront gardens that make up the park. There are more things to see than just plants and animals in the Gardens. Take in the beautiful ways that nature has been reimagined in architecture.

There is always something blooming in the gardens. Visit its cool conservatories and the OCBC Skyway for stunning views from 22 meters above the ground!

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam
Limestone islands dot the waters of Ha Long Bay.

iStock.com/Balate Dorin

Ha Long Bay is another one of the iconic places around the world and it’s one of the most beautiful bays in Vietnam. It has thousands of limestone islands surrounded by thick rainforests. Guests can see islands like Stone Dog and Teapot, which got their names from their shapes, on junk boat cruises and sea kayak trips. Divers go to Cát Bà National Park for scuba diving and rock climbing, and hikers go there for the same reasons.

People go to Ha Long Bay in search of adventure, natural beauty and luxurious places to stay. Since 1994, Ha Long Bay has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is one of the most beautiful natural places in the world!

Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

Marina Bay Sands, Singapore
Marina Bay Sands is an impressive waterfront resort of epic proportions.

iStock.com/MasterLu

Singapore’s Marina Bay Sands is an all-inclusive waterfront resort. It debuted in 2010 as the world’s most expensive stand-alone casino facility, operated by the Las Vegas Sands Corporation. It cost S$8 billion, which is approximately $6.88 billion in U.S. dollars.

The resort boasts 1,300,000 square feet of convention and exhibition space: along with 500 tables and 1,600 slot machines. It is considered the largest atrium casino in the world.

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan
Mount Fuji, or Fugaku, is the tallest peak in Japan.

iStock.com/Goryu

Mount Fuji, often referred to as Fugaku, is Japan’s tallest peak. It is located on Honshu, Japan’s largest island. It has a height of 3,776.24 meters (12,389.2 ft). In terms of elevation, Mt. Kerinci is Asia’s second-highest volcano and the world’s seventh-highest island spire.

During the years 1707-1708, Mt. Fuji last erupted. From Tokyo, which is around 62 miles southwest of the top, you can see the peak on clear days. Mount Fuji’s unusually asymmetric cone is frequently depicted in art and photography, and it is a famous tourist destination and attracts many climbers throughout the year.

Along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku, Mount Fuji is considered a “Holy Mountain” in Japan. It is a national historic site and one of Japan’s most beautiful spots.

Petronas Towers, Malaysia

Petronas Towers, Malaysia
The tallest twin buildings in the world are the Petronas Twin Towers, a ‘two-for-one’ most iconic site from around the world!

iStock.com/Rat0007

The Petronas Twin Towers is the name for two 88-story skyscrapers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They are also called the KLCC Twin Towers and the Petronas Towers. With a height of 451.9 meters (1,483 ft), they are the tallest twin buildings in the world. When they were first built, they were the tallest buildings on Earth (from 1998 to 2004). Considered two of Kuala Lumpur’s most famous landmarks, these twin towers can be viewed from many different spots in the area!

Potala Palace, China

Potala Palace, China
Potala Palace in Tibet is the traditional residence of the Dalai Lama.

iStock.com/Hung_Chung_Chih

The traditional residence of the Dalai Lama is the Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet. Lhasa, Tibet’s Potala Palace has been a World Heritage Site since 1959. It is 400 meters east to west, 350 meters north to south. It has 3 m (9.8 ft) thick walls on average and 5 m (16 ft) at the base. Copper was placed into its foundations in order to withstand earthquakes.

Every season in Tibet is different, but Potala Palace can be seen at any time. The busiest times are June through October, especially on Chinese National Day. Most Chinese tourists come in July, August and early October.

N Seoul Tower, South Korea

N Seoul Tower, South Korea
The N Seoul Tower skyscraper is one of the most popular sites in Seoul.

iStock.com/kamponwarit

N Seoul Tower, also known as Namsan Tower, is a viewing tower on Seoul’s Nam Mountain. It is officially known as the YTN Seoul Tower. The 236-meter (774-foot) skyscraper is Seoul’s second-tallest structure.

The N Seoul Tower is the first general radio wave tower in South Korea. It transmits TV and radio transmissions throughout Seoul. Currently, the tower transmits signals to Korean media networks like KBS, MBC, and SBS. One of the most popular destinations in Seoul.

Taipei 101, Taiwan

Taipei 101, Taiwan
Taipei 101 in Taiwan features traditional Asian aesthetics with modern materials.

iStock.com/SeanPavonePhoto

One of the tallest buildings in Taipei, Taiwan, is known as Taipei 101. From its opening in 2004 until the completion of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, UAE, this building was officially the world’s tallest. It was the world’s first skyscraper to rise above half a kilometer in height when it was completed.

Architecturally, Taipei 101’s postmodernist design pays homage to traditional Asian aesthetics while integrating high-tech materials. The structure’s design combines numerous elements that help it survive earthquakes and tropical storms from the Pacific Ring of Fire. An observation deck is located at the top of the tower, which has both indoor and outdoor viewing areas.

Taj Mahal, India

Taj Mahal, India
No list of world sites is complete without India’s iconic Taj Mahal.

iStock.com/Elena-studio

The Taj Mahal is a marble mausoleum in Agra, India. Shah Jahan, who was king from 1628 to 1658, ordered it to be built in 1632 to hold both Mumtaz Mahal’s tomb and his own. The tomb is part of a 42-acre compound that also has a mosque and a guest house. It is in formal gardens surrounded by a wall with towers.

The Taj Mahal is a UNESCO World Heritage Site because it is “the crown jewel of Muslim art in India and one of the most admired works of art in the world.” It is seen as the best example of Mughal architecture and a symbol of India’s history. The best time to go on a tour is from November to February. In the off-season, discounts are available.

The Bund, China

The Bund, China
The Bund is a historical district featuring the Shanghai waterfront.

iStock.com/charactery

The Bund or Waitan is a central Shanghai waterfront and historical district. In the eastern portion of the Huangpu District, there is a segment of Zhongshan Road along the western bank of the Huangpu River in the former Shanghai International Settlement. From the riverbank, one can see the structures of the Pudong District in Lujiazui.

On the west bank of the Huangpu River, on the south end of The Bund, lies an artificial beach. These beaches with white sand are open to the public throughout the summer.

The Demilitarized Zone, Korea

The Demilitarized Zone Korea
The Korean Demilitarized Zone is one of the few Cold War fronts that remain in the world today.

iStock.com/Stephen Anthony Rohan

The Korean Demilitarized Zone (DZ) is a strip of land located in the north of the Korean Peninsula. According to the Korean Armistice Agreement, which North Korea, China and the UN Command all signed in 1953, it was designated as a buffer zone between North and South Korea.

The DMZ stretches over 250 km (160 miles) and is 4 km (2.5 miles) wide. Despite warnings that the DMZ, roughly 30 miles north of Seoul, is one of the most dangerous areas in the world, enormous numbers of people still visit each year. It is also one of the few Cold War fronts to remain in the world.

The Forbidden City, China

The Forbidden City, China
The world’s largest royal palace complex is the Forbidden City in Beijing.

iStock.com/zhaojiankang

The Forbidden City is a palace complex that was built by the Qing Dynasty. It is in the Imperial City in the Dongcheng District of Beijing. Some of the beautiful imperial parks that surround this beautiful building are Zhongshan Park, Imperial Ancestral Temple, Beihai Park and Jingshan Park. Some examples are the Imperial Ancestral Temple and Zhongshan Park.

The complex takes up more than 720,000 square meters, or 178 acres, of land. It has 980 buildings and 8,886 rooms. The Forbidden City is one of a kind. It is the world’s largest royal palace complex. For the first time in the exhibit’s history, anyone with a ticket can go see it. It gets tens of thousands of visitors every day!

The Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China
Walk the entire length or just a portion of the Great Wall of China to take in all that this impressive site has to offer.

iStock.com/SeanPavonePhoto

The Great Wall of China was constructed to defend ancient Chinese kingdoms and the Chinese Empire against invasion by nomads from the Eurasian Steppe. Several walls were constructed in the seventh century B.C., and Qin Shi Huang (220–206 B.C.) joined several segments. Successive dynasties constructed and maintained border defenses. The wall’s most famous sections were constructed during the Ming era (1368–1644)

You can walk the entire 1,800-mile distance from the Gobi Desert to the Yellow Sea, or just a portion of it, with a tour group. Both involve physical conditioning, shoes and readiness. In addition to paragliding for a bird’s-eye perspective, you may also picnic and camp in specified areas.

Tokyo Imperial Palace, Japan

Tokyo Imperial Palace, Japan
Visit the home of the Emperor, Tokyo Imperial Palace.

iStock.com/golaizola

Tokyo Imperial Palace is the Emperor’s home. This is a big park-like area in Tokyo’s Chiyoda district. It has the Fukiage Palace, where the Emperor lives, the main palace, where celebrations take place, Imperial Family homes, an archive, museums and offices.

The grounds feature locations for cherry blossoms, art galleries, historical ruins, magnificent gardens and unique spaces for royalty. Walk from Tokyo Station to the most expensive land in Japan. The Imperial Palace’s parks and gardens are a true Tokyo retreat.

Tian Tan Buddha (aka The big Buddha), Hong Kong

Tian Tan Buddha (aka The big Buddha), Hong Kong
The Big Buddha is a site you won’t want to miss in Taiwan.

iStock.com/wnjay_wootthisak

On Lantau Island’s Ngong Ping stands the 1993-completed, enormous bronze statue of Buddha known as the Big Buddha. This statue is in Taiwan near the Po Lin Monastery. It depicts harmony between man, the natural world and people of all faiths.

The quickest way to reach the statue is by taking a ferry from Central to Mui Wo and then transferring to Bus No. 2 at the Mui Wo Ferry Pier. Alternately, adventurous access to the Big Buddha is by the Ngong Ping Cable Car from the Tung Chung MTR station.

Australia

Bondi Beach, Australia

Bondi Beach, Australia
Bondi Beach is the perfect Australian getaway.

iStock.com/jamenpercy

In Australia, Bondi Beach is the place to be. Walk along the beach or swim in one of the many waterholes along Campbell Parade to start your day. People who have been swimming in the ocean can use showers that are open to the public. On the Bondi to Coogee Coastal Walk, you can see a lot of interesting things. You can play golf at the Bondi Golf Club.

Sculpture by the Sea is a 2-kilometer seaside walk with art installations that takes pace in October and November. You can enjoy some freshly caught fish and chips that you bought at Campbell Parade at the beach. As the sun goes down over the water, Bondi Icebergs Club serve drinks.

Bungle Range, Australia

Bungle Range, Australia
Purnululu Național Park is home to the sandstone Bungle Range.

iStock.com/Photon-Photos

Their 300-meter-tall orange and black sandstone pillars, known as Bungle, are among the world’s most intriguing geological wonders. Purnululu National Park in Western Australia’s Kimberley area is home to the world-heritage-listed Bungle Range. Known to the rest of the world as ‘sandstone,’ Purnululu was first discovered in the mid-1980s by local Aboriginal people.

In addition to planning a self-drive excursion to the Bungles, which includes lodging options, such as camping and cabins, or a longer tour that includes the Bungles, you may also schedule an aerial or 4WD tour of the Bungles from Kununurra and Broome.

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

Great Barrier Reef, Australia
The Great Barrier Reef is home to over 1,600 types of fish!

iStock.com/chameleonseye

A visit to the Great Barrier Reef is one of many people’s lifelong goals. In addition to the beautiful coral formations, giant clams, rare whale species and six of the seven marine turtle species in the world, the Great Barrier Reef is home to more than 1,600 kinds of fish. In this city, there is so much to see and do, and so many ways to accomplish it.

Along Australia’s east coast are over 2,300 kilometers (1,430 miles) of natural beauty, including conservation-focused educational institutions and undersea research. Peruse this list of must-dos to get a taste of the Great Barrier Reef’s top attractions.

Sydney Harbor Bridge, Australia

Sydney Harbor Bridge, Australia
The Sydney Harbor bridge is one of Australias iconic features.

iStock.com/RudyBalasko

The Sydney Harbor Bridge is a steel-through arch bridge that crosses Sydney Harbor from the Central Business District to the North Shore. The view from the bridge, which takes in the harbor and the nearby Sydney Opera House, is one of the most well-known sights in Sydney and all of Australia. The bridge is called “The Coathanger” because it looks like an arch. It is a way for trains, cars, bikes, and people to get from one place to another.

The southeast pylon has been a popular tourist spot for a long time. It can be reached by walking across the bridge and then climbing 200 steps to the top. Since 1998, a non-profit group called Bridge Climb has given people permission to climb the south side of the bridge. Tours are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week unless there is lightning or a lot of wind.

Sydney Opera House, Australia

Sydney Opera House, Australia
The structure of the Sydney Opera House in Australia is completely one-of-a-kind.

iStock.com/ai_yoshi

There are numerous performance spaces within the Sydney Opera House. In addition to being one of the most recognizable and iconic places in the world, the Sydney Opera House is largely considered a masterpiece of twentieth-century architecture.

Come to the Sydney Opera House to see the best of the performing arts and cultural life in Australia’s largest city. Musicals, comedies, arias, symphonies, backstage tours and puppet performances are just some of the offerings at this year’s festival. Everything is set up and ready for your arrival.

The Twelve Apostles, Australia

The Twelve Apostles, Australia
These limestone stacks are known as the Twelve Apostles.

iStock.com/RubyRascal

The Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia, is home to a group of limestone stacks known as the Twelve Apostles. As a result of their proximity, the area has become a famous tourist destination. The Twelve Apostles were formed because of the Southern Ocean’s continual erosion of continental limestone cliffs. Great Ocean Road’s most famous landmark, the Twelve Apostles are a must-see for visitors to Victoria.

Uluru, Australia

Uluru, Australia
Uluru is within the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park.

iStock.com/phastflyer

Uluru is a sandstone monolith in the Northern Territory’s “Red Centre.” 450 km away is Alice Springs. It began forming 550 million years ago, according to indigenous Australians. It’s in Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, which also features “The Olgas.”

Climbing Uluru has been banned, but you can touch it on a base walk. You can learn more about Uluru’s sacred locations from the Anangu people when you visit.

Europe

Brandenburg Gate, Germany

Brandenburg Gate, Germany
The Brandenburg Gate is Berlin’s feature monument.

iStock.com/TomasSereda

The Brandenburg Gate, a neoclassical landmark in Berlin, was commissioned by Prussian king Frederick William II after he re-established the Orangist power by repressing the Dutch popular uprising in the 17th century. Visitors to Berlin should not miss Brandenburg Gate, the city’s most iconic monument. It was a representation of the Berlin and German divide during the Cold War, but it is now a national sign of peace and unification.

Buckingham Palace, England

Buckingham Palace, England
Visit Buckingham Palace while the Royal Family is on vacation!

iStock.com/coward_lion

Buckingham Palace is the UK monarch’s administrative headquarters. Westminster Palace hosts state events and royal hospitality. Queen lives in Buckingham Palace. Buckingham Palace is the Queen’s London residence. Since 1837, it’s been the monarchy’s London residence. The first resident was Queen Victoria.

Certain times have tour tickets. These tickets provide timed entry to Buckingham Palace’s State Rooms. Visitors can see the Queen’s bedroom, artwork, and furnishings. The tickets are only available when the Royal Family is on vacation from July to September.

Cliffs of Moher, Ireland

Cliffs of Moher, Ireland
The Cliffs of Moher feature abrupt cliff edges, making them a vertical feature of the landscape.

iStock.com/romrodinka

Because of the abruptness of the cliff’s edge, the Cliffs of Moher are completely vertical. The Aran Islands can be seen etched in the seas of Galway Bay on a clear day. Even from the edge of the cliff, where the waves pound on the sandstone and shale, you can hear the roaring far below. It is truly a magnificent place to be.

The Cliffs of Moher, one of Ireland’s most popular tourist attractions, tower over the rough West Clare coastline. Enjoy the breathtaking views of the Atlantic Ocean and the Aran Islands from the cliffs of Europe’s western frontier. The greatest time to go is just after sunset when the sun is setting in the west.

Giant’s Causeway, Ireland

Giant’s Causeway, Ireland
The Giant’s Causeway is both a World Heritage Site and wildlife preserve.

iStock.com/Aitormmfoto

The Giant’s Causeway is 40,000 interconnecting basalt columns from a volcanic fissure outburst. It’s in County Antrim, north of Bushmills, roughly 5 kilometers away. UNESCO proclaimed it a World Heritage Site in 1986 and a wildlife reserve in 1987.

The column tops make stepping stones from the cliff to the sea. Some columns have four, five, seven, or eight sides. In spots, the solidified lava in the cliffs is 28 meters (92 ft) thick. Northern Ireland’s only UNESCO World Heritage Site features the giant’s boot and wishing chair.

Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy

Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
The Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy is a well-known monument of the world.

iStock.com/Gian Lorenzo Ferretti Photography

Leaning Tower of Pisa is the campanile of Pisa Cathedral. It has a 4-degree lean due to an unstable base. The tower is one of three monuments in Pisa’s Cathedral Square, together with the cathedral and baptistry.

On the low side, the tower is 55.86 m (183 ft 3 in) tall and 56.67 m (185 ft 11 in) high. 2.44 m is the base wall width (8 ft 0 in). You can walk the Piazza Dei Miracoli, take photos, and climb the 294 steps to the tower’s top.

Neuschwanstein Castle, Germany

Neuschwanstein Castle, Germany
Neuschwanstein Castle was built when castles were no longer needed as fortresses and has modern features.

iStock.com/sorincolac

Neuschwanstein Castle is a 19th-century historicist palace atop Hohenschwangau near Füssen, Bavaria. As a getaway and to honor Richard Wagner, King Ludwig II of Bavaria commissioned the mansion. Neuschwanstein is a paradoxical castle. It was erected when castles were no longer needed as fortresses, and Louis required it to feature the latest technology.

You can tour Neuschwanstein Castle. The 30-35 minute tour moves rapidly. The attraction is near hotels. It’s feasible to acquire a good photo of the castle’s façade, though. If you walk 15 minutes to Queen Mary’s Bridge, you can have a great view of the castle.

Notre-Dame de Paris

Notre-Dame de Paris
The Notre Dame, one of the most renowned medieval Gothic churches in the world.

iStock.com/Unaihuiziphotography

An ancient Catholic cathedral in the 4th arrondissement of Paris known as Notre-Dame de Paris, or simply Notre Dame, is a medieval building on the island known as the Île de la Cité. One of the finest specimens of French Gothic architecture may be found in this cathedral, which is devoted to the Virgin Mary. Because of its sheer size and age, it is one of the most renowned medieval Gothic churches in the world.

It is estimated that over 13 million people visit the Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral each year, which works out to an average of 30,000 visitors per day, with peak days seeing as many as 50,000 pilgrims and visitors.

Pompeii, Italy

Pompeii Italy
Visit the site of Pompeii, a city frozen in time.

iStock.com/LARISA SHPINEVA

Pompeii is a large archaeological site on the Bay of Naples in southern Italy’s Campania region. Once a prosperous Roman metropolis, Pompeii was buried in 79 A.D. by Mount Vesuvius’s explosion. The conserved site contains excavated roadways and home ruins.

Ring of Kerry, Ireland

Ring of Kerry, Ireland
The Ring of Kerry is Ireland’s most famous bicycle path, and the sheep like it too.

iStock.com/Lisa5201

The Ring of Kerry is a 111-mile round circuit in County Kerry, Ireland. This part of County Kerry has white and sandy beaches that span for miles. Derrynane, Rossbeigh and St Finian’s Bay are three of the Iveragh Peninsula’s most picturesque beaches.

This path around the Iveragh Peninsula, beginning and ending in Killarney, includes Moll’s Gap, Torc Waterfall and the Gap of Dunloe. This 179 km journey features lakes, rivers, waterfalls, villas and castles at every turn. Ring of Kerry is Ireland’s most famous bicycle path. Kerry’s air and landscape are unbeatable.

Stonehenge, England

Stonehenge, England
Stonehenge stands before the rising sun.

iStock.com/JonathanKhoo

Stonehenge is a famous British landmark and cultural icon. it is in Wiltshire, England, two miles (3 km) west of Amesbury. It has an outer ring of 13-foot-high, 7-foot-wide sarsen standing stones capped by horizontal lintel stones. A ring of bluestones is inside. These have freestanding trilithons, two vertical Sarsens linked by a lintel. Now dilapidated, the monument faces the summer solstice sunrise. The stones are situated within earthworks in the densest Neolithic and Bronze Age monument complex in England, including hundreds of tumuli (burial mounds).

The summer months of June through August can be hectic, but you’ll likely enjoy good weather. Even in December, Stonehenge is open year-round. Christmas Day is the only day it’s closed. In December, Stonehenge is cold and rainy.

The “Fallen” Berlin Wall, Germany

The “Fallen” Berlin Wall, Germany
You can follow the Berlin Wall by bike along its cycle route.

iStock.com/serkansenturk

The Berlin Wall spanned 13 August 1961 to 9 November 1989. The East Side Gallery, the Berlin Wall Memorial at Bernauer Strasse, the Berlin-Hohenschönhausen Memorial, a former Stasi detention facility and the Mauerpark are all remnants of the Wall. Double cobblestones mark the Berlin Wall passage in some streets.

The Berlin Wall Cycle Route lets you trace the Wall by bike. It follows the Berlin Wall’s passage through the city. The 160-kilometer route follows the former GDR border around West Berlin. The East Side Gallery is the oldest piece of the Berlin Wall. In 1990, more than 100 artists from 20 countries decorated this backwater wall.

The Colosseum, Italy

The Colosseum, Italy
The Roman Colosseum is the largest ancient amphitheater ever built, and still standing today.

iStock.com/frederic prochasson

The Colosseum is in Rome, Italy, east of the Roman Forum. It’s the largest ancient amphitheater ever built and the largest still standing. The Colosseum is famed for Roman gladiator combat. Dion Cassius stated that 9000 wild animals were slain during the 100-day amphitheater inauguration. Early in the morning, before crowds build, and during the week are the best times to see the Colosseum. If you’re ready to spend more, a night tour is said to be even more interesting.

The Eiffel Tower, France

The Eiffel Tower, France
Another famous world landmark to cross of the bucket list, The Eiffel Tower in Paris.

iStock.com/Sean3810

Paris’ Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower atop Champ de Mars. The tower was conceived and built by Gustave Eiffel. Locally nicknamed “La dame de fer” (French for “Iron Lady”), it was built from 1887 to 1889 as the centerpiece of the 1889 World’s Fair. It was initially criticized by France’s leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France and one of the world’s most recognizable structures.

The tower is the most-visited paid monument worldwide. Every day, 25,000 people climb the tower, resulting in long lines.

The Great Mosque of Cordoba, Spain

The Great Mosque of Cordoba, Spain
The Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba in Madrid.

iStock.com/StockByM

The Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba, also known as the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption, is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Córdoba in Andalusia. one of the earliest structures from when Muslims governed Al-Andalus (much of Spain, Portugal, and southern France) in the late 8th century. Córdoba, two hours south of Madrid, draws travelers from over the world.

The London Eye, England

The London Eye, England
The London Eye, or Millennium Wheel.

iStock.com/QQ7

The South Bank of the River Thames is home to the London Eye, often known as the Millennium Wheel. One of London’s Most Recognizable Landmarks: Public relations campaigns employ the London Eye as a global icon of contemporary London. The London Eye, the first cantilevered observation wheel, is a technological and design marvel. There are three million visitors annually, making it the most popular paid attraction in the United Kingdom.

The Trevi Fountain, Italy

The Trevi Fountain, Italy
Fontana di Trevi, the most famous Baroque fountain in Rome

iStock.com/Yasonya

The Trevi Fountain was designed by Nicola Salvi and Giuseppe Pannini and built in the 18th century in Rome, Italy. Also known as Fontana di Trevi in Italian, it is the most famous Baroque fountain in Rome. In 1762, Giuseppe Pannini finished it.

Bus and rail tickets can be purchased from multilingual vending machines at Termini, tobacconists, and taverns with the ‘M’ symbol. The purchase of a ticket is required prior to boarding a bus or subway. People gather around Trevi Fountain. Zoom in and move back if you don’t want images ruined by tourists’ heads.

Titanic Belfast, Ireland

Titanic Belfast, Ireland
The Titanic Belfast offers a trip through time.

iStock.com/zhuzhu

The RMS Titanic was constructed in the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast, which is now home to the Titanic visitor attraction. It tells the tales of the Titanic, which sank in 1912 after striking an iceberg, and her two sister ships, the RMS Olympic and the HMHS Britannic. More than 130,000 square feet (12,000 square meters) of gallery space, private event rooms and common areas are available in the structure.

Since 2012, the Titanic Visitor Center has earned 15 different awards. Tourism to Northern Ireland has been boosted by Titanic Belfast in recent years. Both Queen Elizabeth II and the Titanic’s discoverer, Dr. Robert Ballard, have paid a visit.

Tower of London, England

Tower of London, England
Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London.

iStock.com/rabbit75_ist

Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, more commonly known as simply “The Tower of London,” is a fortress on the north bank of the River Thames in the heart of London. It is part of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets and is physically separated from the eastern boundary of the City of London’s square mile by Tower Hill. As part of the Norman Conquest, it was established there by the end of 1066.

Go on an adventure to London’s famous castle, a designated World Heritage Site. In this, the year of the Platinum Jubilee, you may get closer than ever before to the Crown Jewels, see the famed Yeoman Warders and ravens, and get an insider’s view of the Tower. The medieval moat of the Tower of London will be transformed into a lovely new naturalistic landscape from June to September, just in time to celebrate Her Majesty the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee year. Over the course of the summer, the flowers will change hues and fragrances, providing visitors with a unique sensory experience.

Wembley Stadium, England

Wembley Stadium, England
The birthplace of English football, Wembley Stadium.

iStock.com/AmandaLewis

Wembley Stadium, in the London neighborhood of the same name, is home to a football stadium. Many England games, including the FA Cup Final, are played at this venue. The FA, whose offices are in the stadium, owns Wembley National Stadium Ltd. (WNSL). It has 90,000 seats, making it the largest stadium in both the United Kingdom and Europe.

See the birthplace of English football at Wembley Stadium first. You can get a manager’s perspective on the game by going up the stairs to the Royal Box and sitting in the dugout.

Westminster Abbey, England

Westminster Abbey, England
A popular place for royal weddings, Westminister Abbey.

iStock.com/damienkeating

Located to the west of the Palace of Westminster in London, England is the massive Gothic abbey church known as Westminster Abbey or the Collegiate Church of Saint Peter at Westminster. There have been 17 royal weddings held at Westminster Abbey, the most recent being Prince William and Catherine Middleton’s in 2011.

Get your London Pass and then go to the Abbey. There’s no need to make a reservation. Restrictions are in place to prevent unauthorized entry.

Windsor Castle, England

Windsor Castle, England
The largest and oldest inhabited castle in the world, the Windsor castle.

iStock.com/iweta0077

Windsor Castle is the world’s largest and oldest inhabited castle. This royal palace serves as the official residence of the monarch and is home to a staff of about 150. Windsor Castle is in Berkshire, England. Its nearly millennia-long architectural history is intertwined with that of the British royal family.

The castle is open Tuesday through Sunday each week. The castle, which is the world’s largest and oldest continuously inhabited castle at 13 acres, is where the Queen spends most of her weekends.

North America

Banff National Park, Canada

Banff National Park, Canada
Banff National Park in Canada offers much to explore.

iStock.com/Leamus

Banff National Park is known for its strange lakes, stunning mountains, and plenty of recreational pursuits. Since it was established as the third national park in the world and the first in Canada, Banff National Park is steeped in mountain tradition.

Banff is best between June and August, and between December and March. Visit while the weather is nice and hotel rates are inexpensive if you enjoy nature. Many people who ski choose to take trips during the winter months.

Empire State Building, The United States

Empire State Building, The United States
The Empire State Building is a national icon and stand-out feature of the Manhattan cityscape.

iStock.com/Shooter_Sam

In Manhattan stands the Empire State Building, a 102-story Art Deco landmark. It was constructed from 1930 to 1931 and was designed by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon. It gives New York it’s nickname as the “Empire State.”

When it first opened in 1931, the Empire State Building quickly became a national icon. Among the city’s many impressive structures, this one certainly stands out.

Fairmont Le Château Frontenac, Canada

Fairmont Le Château Frontenac, Canada
The Château Frontenac is a famously grand hotel.

iStock.com/Bombaert

The Château Frontenac in Quebec City, Canada, is a venerable establishment. The hotel may be found in Old Quebec’s Upper Town, south of the Place d’Armes. The CP Railway constructed Château Frontenac, which was designed by Bruce Price. The hotel is managed by Fairmont Hotels.

Built by a Canadian railroad firm in the late 19th century, the Château Frontenac is a famously grand hotel. It is the most photographed hotel in the world and a National Historic Landmark. The hotel has 610 rooms and suites, all of which have a touch of old Europe.

Golden Gate Bridge, The United States

Golden Gate Bridge, The United States
The iconic Golden Gate Bridge, a world famous suspension bridge.

iStock.com/Christine944

Between San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean, there is a narrow channel about a mile wide where the Golden Gate Bridge stands as a symbol of the city. Suspension-bridge designs around the world can thank the Golden Gate Bridge for its inspiration.

The bridge can be crossed by car, bike or foot. Within 10 minutes, a cyclist may cover the 1.7 miles (or 1,280 meters) of the Golden Gate Bridge without stopping. Seeing new places and learning about their histories is an enjoyable pastime. It’s a 3-kilometer round-trip if you walk across and back (5 m.) The Golden Gate Bridge is a landmark crossing for tourists from all around the world.

Great Pyramid of Cholula, Mexico

Great Pyramid of Cholula, Mexico
The Great Pyramid of Cholula in Mexico is the largest in the world!

iStock.com/flocu

Cholula, Puebla, Mexico is home to a massive pyramid known as the Great Pyramid of Cholula. This is the greatest pyramid site in the New World and the largest pyramid in the world! It is four times Giza’s size. The enormous pyramid has been covered with dirt, and a replica of a Spanish cathedral sits on it. With 496,518 visitors in 2017, the pyramid is Cholula’s top draw.

Route 66, The United States

Route 66, The United States
Get your kicks on the famed Route 66.

iStock.com/Wolfgang Gafriller

One of the first numbered roadways in the United States was Route 66. The designation of US 66 was made official in 1926. Westbound travelers appreciated the shorter trip on Route 66 between Chicago and Los Angeles. Aluminum and chrome eateries, mom-and-pop cafes and outlandish attractions dot Route 66 from Chicago to St. Louis.

The initial part of the route takes you through rural areas with cornfields and open grasslands in between towns and settlements. Driving the length of Route 66 will take you roughly three weeks. There’s never a dull moment on Route 66.

Hoover Dam, The United States

Hoover Dam, The United States
The massive Hoover Dam.

iStock.com/Sean Pavone

The Hoover Dam in Nevada and Arizona is a concrete arch-gravity dam on the Colorado River. During the height of the Great Depression, on September 30, 1935, FDR dedicated the building. Two football fields could fit inside its foundation. The amount of water that flows over Niagara Falls is controlled by a series of spillways, which prevents damage to the dam.

In October of 2010, the Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge was dedicated just downstream from Hoover Dam. The dam is no longer accessible through US 93. The dam is accessible through NV-172, which is reached off US-93.

Mount Rushmore, The United States

Mount Rushmore, The United States
Four faces of former presidents are carved into the granite of Mount Rushmore.

iStock.com/Patrick Jennings

Mount Rushmore is the highest point in South Dakota, and its granite peak is carved with the faces of four former U.S. presidents. Visit iconic figures from American histories like Lincoln, Washington, Roosevelt, and Jefferson and have your picture taken with them.

Each year, almost 2 million people make the trip to see Mount Rushmore. Busy times are in June, July, and August. May, September, and October are good times to visit because they are less busy. Keeping away from the masses The hours of 3:30 p.m. and later, or before 9 a.m., are optimal.

Niagara Falls, Canada and The United States

Niagra Falls features falls in both the United States and Canada.

CPQ/Shutterstock.com

The Niagara River has two waterfalls known as Niagra Falls, and the area around them is a major tourist draw. The power of Niagara Falls is a major source of revenue for the province of Ontario. It is connected to the American side of the falls via the Rainbow, Whirlpool and Queenston-Lewiston bridges. The Horseshoe Falls, also known as the Canadian Falls, is in Canada and the American Falls are located in the United States.

Peggy’s Point Lighthouse, Canada

Peggy’s Point Lighthouse, Canada
Peggy’s Point Lighthouse on the smooth bouldered coastline of Nova Scotia is a Canadian icon.

iStock.com/Meybruck

The Peggys Point Lighthouse, a national icon of Canada, is also a functional lighthouse. It is an iconic landmark along the Lighthouse Trail and a major draw for visitors to the Nova Scotia town of Peggy’s Cove.

Peggy’s Cove is breathtaking because of the rounded, smooth granite boulders that have been shaped by the wind and rain. The sea and coastline are particularly rocky in Nova Scotia, which adds to the region’s mysterious aura.

Seattle Space Needle, The United States

Seattle Space Needle, The United States
There’s no better way to take in the cityscape of Seattle than from atop the Space Needle.

iStock.com/Beboy_ltd

Seattle, Washington, is home to a famous landmark known as the Space Needle. This building has become a symbol of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. Seattle’s innovative spirit is represented by the Space Needle, which was constructed for the 1962 World’s Fair.

There is a restaurant called Sky City, at 500 feet, and an observation deck at 520 feet up in the Space Needle (150 m). Check out the cityscape of Seattle, the brand-new spinning motor, the see-through glass floors of the restaurant and the glass enclosure of the observation deck.

Statue of Liberty, The United States

Statue of Liberty, The United States
New York’s Statue of Liberty was modeled after the Roman goddess Libertas.

iStock.com/spyarm

Since its erection in 1886, The Statue of Liberty has represented the ideals of democracy and freedom in the United States. It’s a source of inspiration for liberation movements all throughout the world. Since ancient portrayals of Liberty are typically depicted as female, the National Park Service has stated that the statue was modeled after the Roman goddess Libertas.

The Statue of Liberty is open for viewing in a variety of ways. Start in New York or New Jersey with a Statue of Liberty Cruise from Battery Park or Liberty State Park. There are a lot of different ticket options to choose from.

The Arch The United States

Gateway Park National Park
Venture to the top of the tallest man-made structure in the Western Hemisphere, in Missouri, for some epic aerial views!

amolson7/Shutterstock.com

St. Louis, Missouri is home to the world’s tallest arch, a symbol of the Westward Expansion that was constructed in the early 20th century. The Gateway Arch, as it is commonly known, is a magnificent structure. With a height of about 200 meters, the stainless steel tower is the tallest man-made structure in the Western Hemisphere. You can take pictures down below or you can venture to the top for some unique aerial views!

The Grand Canyon, The United States

Grand Canyon National Park in Winter
The breathtaking views of the Grand Canyon feature some of the oldest rocks on the planet!

Kobby Dagan/Shutterstock.com

The stratified strata of red rock at Arizona’s Grand Canyon National Park span millions of years of the earth’s history. The Grand Canyon is home to some of the oldest rocks on the planet. A cross-section of the Earth’s crust from more than two billion years ago is displayed on walls that stretch for miles.

Formations in the rock record past environmental conditions and provide data for evolutionary studies.

Mather Point, the Yavapai Observation Station, the Lookout Studio and the Desert View Watchtower all offer spectacular vistas. At Lipan Point, visitors can watch the sun rise or set over the canyon and the Colorado River.

The Hollywood Sign, The United States

The Hollywood Sign, The United States
The Hollywood sign has become the symbol for the American entertainment industry.

iStock.com/trekandshoot

Overlooking the city of Hollywood in Los Angeles, California is the iconic Hollywood Sign. Beachwood Canyon in the Santa Monica Mountains is home to Mount Lee. This sign, which first appeared in 1923, has become a symbol of the American motion picture business. Since its inception, the Hollywood sign has come to symbolize the glamour, hope, and creativity of the Los Angeles area.

The sign is off-limits to climbing and touching, but there are plenty of photo-ops and vantage points in the vicinity. The Hollywood Sign may be seen from downtown skyscrapers and Signal Hill, 30 miles to the south, on a clear day (through the coin telescopes at least). Whether you’re behind the wheel or on foot, if you look north at any of Hollywood Boulevard’s many intersections, you’ll see the sign.

The White House, The United States

The White House, The United States
The White House is both the presidents home and a museum of American history.

iStock.com/bloodua

The President’s official residence and workplace are the White House. Since John Adams in 1800, the President has resided at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. The White House is both the home of the President and a museum of American history, with exhibits ranging from the recently renovated Ground Floor Corridor rooms to the State Floor rooms, where countless presidents and guests have been entertained.

Visiting the White House requires some advance preparation. Your member of Congress must be contacted at least 21 days, and no more than three months, before your visit if possible.

Tulum Ruins, Mexico

Tulum Ruins, Mexico
The Tulum National Park is a walled ancient Mayan site.

iStock.com/sorincolac

Tulum is a popular Caribbean resort location around 130 km south of Cancun. The Tulum National Park is a walled Mayan site that was built sometime around the 13th century. Atop the cliff is a lookout tower and inside is the Temple of the Paintings (Templo de las Pinturas). Cobá is a complex of pyramid-shaped temples in the middle of the jungle. To see Tulum, go there.

Regular business hours are from 8 am to 5 pm daily. For a fee, visitors can park near the shop part of the ruins, which is the only access to the ruins.

Washington Monument, The United States

Washington Monument, The United States
The Washington Monument was modeled like an Egyptian obelisk.

iStock.com/Sean Pavone

The 555-foot marble Washington Monument stands tall over Washington, DC, and was constructed in 1848 as a tribute to George Washington. The Washington Monument, modeled like an Egyptian obelisk, is a symbol of American awe, devotion, and appreciation toward our nation’s greatest Founding Father. Once construction on the Washington Monument was complete, it stood as the highest structure in the world. Even though it has been surpassed, it holds a significant place in history.

After an overhaul of the elevator and the construction of a permanent screening facility, the Washington Monument is now open to the public once again.

South America

Christ the Redeemer Statue, Brazil

Christ the Redeemer Statue, Brazil
Christ the Redeemer’s home atop Mount Corcovado means its visible anywhere in Rio de Janeiro.

iStock.com/ValterCunha

Christ the Redeemer, which was finished in 1931, is a 98-foot tall statue with horizontally extended arms measuring 92 feet in length. The Christ the Redeemer statue is in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and was built in the Art Deco style. The idea was to “reclaim” Rio (then the capital of Brazil) to Christianity by building a monument on top of Mount Corcovado, which would be visible from wherever in the city. You can get to Christ the Redeemer by bus, van, or on foot to marvel at its glory.

Copacabana Beach, Brazil

Copacabana Beach, Brazil
Brazil’s Copacabana beach is one of the finest of the world.

iStock.com/marchello74

Copacabana, in Brazil, is often regarded as one of the finest beaches in the world. The avenue was constructed by Roberto Burle Marx. The Copacabana Palace Hotel was the choice of both Marlene Dietrich and Lady Diana. The beach is a hot spot for weekend tourists. Although it is one of Rio’s cleanest beaches, Copacabana is not suitable for swimming all year owing to waste.

Sugarloaf Mountain, Brazil

Sugarloaf Mountain, Brazil
Sugarloaf Mountain in Brazil became internationally recognized once its tramway was built.

iStock.com/Lindrik

Sugarloaf Mountain is located on a peninsula near the entrance to Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With a height of 396 meters, it is often compared to a sack of sugar. This landmark became internationally recognized after the tramway was built to it in 1912. The cable car system on the mountain was the third in the world and the first in Brazil. More than a million people flock to Sugarloaf each year to explore the area’s beaches, mountains, and forests.

Share this post on:
About the Author

A substantial part of my life has been spent as a writer and artist, with great respect to observing nature with an analytical and metaphysical eye. Upon close investigation, the natural world exposes truths far beyond the obvious. For me, the source of all that we are is embodied in our planet; and the process of writing and creating art around this topic is an attempt to communicate its wonders.