The Internet Can’t Stop Talking About the Video of a Windsurfer Getting Crushed by a Whale

nice mail sportman windsurfer
© 1254508/Shutterstock.com

Written by Hannah Crawford

Published: October 31, 2023

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“P Sherman, 42 Wallaby Way, Sydney.” While this might have been where Dory and Nemo’s dad were heading in the movie Nemo, that’s not where this surfer in the video below was headed. He wasn’t able to get where he wanted to in Sydney before he was crushed by a whale on the way there! Don’t miss the action below.

Check Out the Crazy News Footage Below!

Whale Sighting in Sydney 

Wipeouts are expected by people who live for the thrill out on the water. However, the reporter in this video said this was not a wipeout this surfer saw coming. Jason Breen, 55 years old, was windsurfing in Sydney, Australia when he abruptly crashed right into a whale!

Breen later reports, “I thought I was gone, to be honest …I thought for a few seconds, ‘This is what it’s like to die.’”

Luckily, Breen had a GoPro that filmed the entire interaction with the whale. Breen had seen the whale slowly come up out of the water. It was like an inevitable car crash that was on its way, and there was nothing he could do to stop what was about to come. 

The whale took him down deep, and Breen reported it felt like he was there for a lifetime. Suddenly, at the right moment, Breen’s armband that was hooked to the board snapped. He was able to swim to the surface alive and well. 

The Guardian reported, “Breen said he was lucky it was a juvenile whale. If it was an adult, he doesn’t think he’d be alive to tell the tale.” Breen said, “There’s no way I’d be here like I’d be gone for sure.” he said. “It was a one in a million.”

How Many Species of Whale Live in Australia?

Killer Whale, orcinus orca, Female with Calf

Killer whales can weigh up to 16,000 pounds.

©slowmotiongli/Shutterstock.com

Australia is approximately 2.97 million square miles. The Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, and the Southern Ocean all surround Australia. According to the Australian Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment of Water, there are 45 species of whales, dolphins, and porpoises are found in Australian waters. Check out the summary of whales found in Australian waters below.

Common NameScientific Name
Sei whaleBalaenoptera borealis
Pygmy right whaleCaperea marginata
Antarctic minke whaleBalaenoptera bonaerensis
Dwarf minke whale (subspecies)Balaenoptera acutorostrata
Southern right whaleEubalaena australis
Sperm whalePhyseter macrocephalus
Pygmy Sperm whaleKogia breviceps
Dwarf sperm whaleKogia sima
Gray’s beaked whaleMesoplodon grayi
Andrews’ beaked whaleMesoplodon bowdoini
True’s beaked whaleMesoplodon mirus
Ginkgo-toothed beaked whaleMesoplodon ginkgodens
Cuvier’s beaked whaleZiphius cavirostris
Hector’s beaked whaleMesoplodon hectori
Shepherd’s beaked whaleTasmacetus shepherdi
Arnoux’s beaked whaleBerardius
Longman’s beaked whaleIndopacetus pacificus
Blainville’s beaked whaleMesoplodon densirostris
Strap-toothed beaked whaleMesoplodon layardii
Southern bottlenose whaleHyperoodon planifrons
Killer whaleOrcinus orca
Pygmy killer whaleFeresa attenuata
False killer whalePseudorca crassidens


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About the Author

Hannah Crawford is a writer at A-Z Animals where she focuses on reptiles, mammals, and locations in Africa. Hannah has been researching and writing about animals and various countries for over eight years. She holds a Bachelors Degree in Communication\Performance Studies from Pensacola Christian College, which she earned in 2015. Hannah is a resident in Florida, and enjoys theatre, poetry, and growing her fish tank.

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