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Echidna

EchidnaEchidnaEchidnaEchidnaEchidna, Melbourne ZooEchidnaTachyglossus aculeatus (Short-beaked Echidna), Tasmania.A wild shortbeak echidna, taken in Swifts Creek, Victoria
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Echidna Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Monotremata
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Tachyglossidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Tachyglossus
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Tachyglossus Aculeatus
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Carnivore
Size (L):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
35cm - 52cm (14in - 20in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
4kg - 7kg (9lbs - 15lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
30km/h (18mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
15 - 40 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Brown, Black, White
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Spiky
Favourite Food:Ants
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Cool and dry forests
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
1
Main Prey:Ants, Termites, Insects
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Eagle, Dingos
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Long snout and spikes and curved claws

Echidna Location

Map of Echidna Locations
Map of Oceania

Echidna

Echidnas are known better as spiny anteaters, although they are not related to them, besides that fact that both anteaters and echidnas eat ants and termites. The echidna is found in parts of New Guinea and Australia.

The echidna has a long tongue around 18cm long that can whip in and out of its mouth at incredible speeds. This helps the echidna to forage for ants an termites.

The echidna was named after a monster in Greek mythology! The echidna can dig incredibly well due to its long claws, meaning that echidna are able to escape danger by digging straight down.

The echidna is a small mammal and the echidna has a long snout that acts as both the mouth and nose of the echidna. The echidna has no teeth and the echidna feeds by tearing soft logs apart and then using its long, sticky tongue to feed on the ants and termites that inhabit the log.

The echidna is a very special mammal and, along with the platypus, the echidna is the only other egg-laying mammal in the world. The echidna lays eggs that have a soft shell and are kept in the pouch of the female echidna until the eggs hatch in a couple of weeks. The young echidna remains in the pouch of the female echidna for around 50 weeks, when the baby echidna has grown spikes. The mother echidna then transfers the young echidna to a nursery burrow and returns every few days to feed the baby until it is around seven months old.

Echidna Comments

kayla
"i love this website :)"
Danceing rainbow
"Love this website and love it"
yana
"this is awesome its the only website I could find with this info on echidna"
Caty Bendisu
"I could not find out were the enchinda lived :(I)"
awresome
"great that is good info to put on my projest"
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First Published: 10th November 2008, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]

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