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Anteater

Giant Anteater, Santa Babera ZooGiant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), Copenhagen Zoo, DenmarkGiant Anteater, Santa Babera ZooGiant Anteater seaching for foodA Northern Tamandua anteater (Tamandua mexicana), Costa Rica
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Anteater Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Xenarthra
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Myrmecophagidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Tamandua
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Myrmecophaga Tridactyla
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size (L):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
0.9m - 2.1m (3ft - 7ft)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
18kg - 40kg (40lbs - 88lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
30km/h (18mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
9 - 20 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Threatened
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Brown, Grey, Black, Tan
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Fur
Favourite Food:Ants
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Forest and grasslands
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
1
Main Prey:Ants, Termites, Insects
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Puma, Snakes, Jaguar
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Elongated snout and long sticky tongue

Anteater Location

Map of Anteater Locations
Map of South America

Anteater

Anteaters are found throughout the Southern Hemisphere but are more common in Africa, Asia and parts of Australia. The name anteater is given to any medium size insect eating mammal such as the giant anteater, the collared anteater, the silky anteater, the spiny anteater and the echidna which is native to Australia.

The average anteater is nearly a meter in length although some species can be bigger (like the giant anteater that gets to nearly 2m long), where others can be smaller (like the silky anteater that only grows to around 30 cm).

The giant anteater is found in parts of central and south America where it inhabits grasslands, forests, jungles and even the lower mountain regions. The giant anteater is known to be able to consume more than 30,000 insects (mainly termites) every day!

The giant anteater is the largest of four anteater species and can be five to seven feet long from nose to tail. The giant anteater has a narrow head, a long nose, small eyes and round ears.

The giant anteater has coarse hair which can be grey or brown in colour, with a white-banded black stripe running along the giant anteater\'s body. The giant anteater also has a long, bushy tail which can be two to three feet long.

The giant anteater\'s front feet have large claws, which are curled under when the giant anteater walks. Although the giant anteater has poor vision the giant anteater is able to detect food using its keen sense of smell.

Despite their soft appearance, anteaters are more than ready to defend themselves against predators and have been known to become very aggressive towards them. Anteaters primarily use their powerful legs and long claws to warn off larger animals including cougars, jaguars and even humans.

Female anteaters give birth to a single baby after a gestation period of around 6 months. The baby anteaters spend their first couple of years with their mother and usually become independent when she is pregnant again. In order to remain safe from waiting predators on the ground, baby anteaters spend much of their nursing period clinging to the back of their mother.

Today, the giant anteater population numbers are declining mainly due to habitat loss and over-hunting by humans. Although considered vulnerable animals, the giant anteater is not thought to be in immediate danger of extinction but recent reports indicate that there may be less than 5,000 giant anteater individuals left in the wild.

Anteater Translations

български език
Голям мравояд
Català
Ós formiguer
Cesky
Mravenečník velký
Dansk
Stor myresluger
Deutsch
Großer Ameisenbär
English
Giant Anteater
Español
Myrmecophaga tridactyla
Suomi
Isomuurahaiskarhu
Français
Tamanoir
Magyar
Sörényes hangyász
Italiano
Myrmecophaga tridactyla
日本語
オオアリクイ
Nederlands
Reuzenmiereneter
Norsk
Kjempemaursluker
Polski
Mrówkojad wielki
Português
Tamanduá-bandeira
Svenska
Jättemyrslok
中文
大食蟻獸

Anteater Comments

Pradhi
"I hope anteaters are safe again. And they are so cool"
jania
"this website helped bud not everything was on here that i was looking for"
Jacob Inman
"O my god this web sight really helped me in my sience project I did it on anteaters"
Jacob Inman
"O my god this web sight really helped me in my sience project I did it on anteaters"
Beau
":O) I LOVE ANTEATERS"
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First Published: 29th November 2008, Last Updated: 6th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 29 Nov 2008]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 29 Nov 2008]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 29 Nov 2008]

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