The 8 Most Dangerous Hikes in Europe

Written by Patrick MacFarland
Published: March 12, 2024
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Hiking has become one of the most popular activities of all time. Over the years, trails have been added to mountains and hills all over the world. Local or state governments have even added difficulty ratings to their trails to ensure potential hikers know what they’re getting into. The easy trails are for beginners who don’t want to struggle, but every so often, there are difficult hikes out there that test people’s endurance. Sometimes, there are even dangerous hikes out there. Hiking these trails will put you in grave danger, but at the same time, it will spice things up. Those who are thrill-seekers will have a blast with these hikes in Europe. Let’s take a look at the eight most dangerous hikes in Europe.

Caminito del Rey

Caminito Del Rey

The hike is located near Malaga in Ardales, Spain.

©Frank Anschuetz/iStock via Getty Images

El Caminito del Rey is one of the most dangerous hikes in the country and continent. It has been dubbed the “Walkway of Death” and was closed for 15 years because of an accident. It has recently been reopened after some government safety renovations. The hike is about five miles long and hikers can enjoy the open terrain, cliffs, and canyons for about an hour. The dangerous part is the boardwalks along the curvy parts of the hike. You make a wrong move and you can find yourself at the bottom of the Guadalhorce River.

Dolomites

The hike is located in the Italian Alps in the northern part of the country.

©PositiveTravelArt/Shutterstock.com

The scenic landscapes are one thing you will enjoy while you are on the hike. The valleys and remoteness of the hike make things fun as you hike the 75-mile journey. It takes around 10 days to do if you want to do the entire Alta Via 1 trek. The trails can be narrow and steep, especially because you are hiking at 9,000 feet. You may think the hike it’s a breeze, but always use caution when hiking in the Dolomites.

Trift Bridge Hike

The bridge of Trift in Switzerland

The hike is located in the Swiss Alps in Switzerland.

©Alexandre Bauer/iStock via Getty Images

The Swiss Alps are more known for their fantastic ski slopes than for their treacherous hikes. But in the summer, nature lovers and thrill-seekers need new adventures. This is where the Trift Bridge hike comes in. There are several trails you can take, but the most popular one is from Triftbahn Summit Station, where you will traverse various steep steps to get to the bridge. You will be enchanted with beautiful landscapes of forests, lakes, and gorgeous mountains. And at last, you will have the opportunity to cross the Trift Bridge — a 330-foot tall and 560-foot-long pedestrian bridge.

Grand Randonée

Grand Randonee (GR20) hiking trail in Corsica mountains

The hike is located in the mountains of Corsica, France.

©salajean/iStock via Getty Images

There are various trails where you can hike the beautiful mountains of Corsica. The one that is the most dangerous and treacherous is Trail 20. It even has pre-fixed chains to help hikers because it’s that intense. The trail is about 112 miles long and can take up to two weeks to complete. Throughout the journey, you’ll see amazing views of Lac de Nino, Monte d’Oro, and other natural landmarks.

Aonach Eagach Ridge

Aonach Eagach ridge above Loch Achtriochtan in Glencoe, Scotland

The hike is located in the Scottish highlands.

©fschuetz/iStock via Getty Images

This trek is for those thrill-seekers who want to have heart palpitations at every corner of the hike. The terrain is tough and the ridges in this hike — which are over 3,000 feet tall — are extremely narrow. The Anoach Eagach Ridge is only six miles long, but if you make a wrong move, you might find yourself falling to your death. The trek is steep and most experienced hikers take eight hours to complete it because of the calculated steps they must take. But the views are definitely worth it!

Knivskjellodden

Nordkapp (North Cape), Troms of Finnmark, Norway. commonly referred to as the northernmost point of Europe

The hike is located in the Nordkapp Plateau in Norway.

©Leamus/iStock via Getty Images

The hike is 11 miles and it will take you from Nordkapp to Knivskjellodden. For approximately six hours, you will see the enchanting beauty of the green, blue, and rocky trails. This hike isn’t possible to do in the wintertime because of the snow and lack of visibility. In the summer, however, you will be able to see all of what Norway and the edge of the world have to offer — just be careful of the strong winds, you don’t want to fall!

Faja dos Padres

La Faja dos Padres, a beautiful strip of cultivated land between the cliff and the sea that is accessed by cable car

The hike is located on the island of Madeira in Portugal.

©Joan Dana/iStock via Getty Images

If you want to hike with an ocean view, look no further than Faja dos Padres in Portugal. The four-mile hike is extremely beautiful, but also extremely dangerous. The hike is narrow, the cliffs are slowly coming apart, and the elevation is high (about 1,900 feet). The hike takes several hours to complete, but a word of caution: go slow and use caution. The smartest thing you can do is book a guided tour hike.

Bohemian Paradise

Prachov rocks (Prachovske skaly) in Cesky Raj region, Czech Republic. Sandstone rock formation in vibrant forest. Prachov Rocks, Czech: Prachovske skaly, in Bohemian Paradise, Czech Republic.

The hike is located in the Czech Republic.

©DaLiu/iStock via Getty Images

The Bohemian Paradise is a paradise while you are hiking the beautiful terrain. It is the country’s oldest nature reserve and it is a thrill-seeking adventure. There are various trails to choose from and they aren’t hard, but you have to be careful. Beginners are always warned. The views of castle ruins, rock formations, and other amazing landscapes are too good to pass up, though.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © Michael Derrer Fuchs/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Patrick Macfarland is a writer at A-Z Animals primarily covering travel, geography, and history. Patrick has been writing for more than 10 years. In the past, he has been a teacher and a political candidate. He holds a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science from SDSU and a Master's Degree in European Union Studies from CIFE. From San Diego, California, Patrick loves to travel and try new recipes to cook.

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