Venus Flytrap Seeds: Grow Your Own Carnivorous Plant!

Written by August Croft
Updated: January 24, 2023
© iStock.com/Karin de Mamiel
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Have you ever thought about growing your own Venus flytrap seeds? These notorious carnivorous plants are available as fully grown individuals in a number of stores, including pet stores and garden centers. However, Venus flytraps are also available through seed purchases, but just how difficult are they to grow? 

You can grow your own Venus flytrap seeds using a soil mixture of perlite, silica sand, and peat moss. Sow your seeds directly on the surface and do not bury them, and make sure to plant your seeds in a well-ventilated container with a lid. Keep them consistently moist while they germinate for about a month, and make sure your seeds are above 75 degrees Fahrenheit in indirect sunlight.

There’s a lot to learn about properly growing Venus flytraps. Here’s how to do it, step by step. 

Venus Flytrap Seeds
You can grow your own Venus flytrap seeds using a soil mixture of perlite, silica sand, and peat moss.

©Menno van der Haven/Shutterstock.com

Venus Flytrap SeedsHow to Grow
Soil, Light, and Temp RequirementsSandy soil (peat moss, perlite, or silica bases), indirect light initially, and keep above 75 degrees Fahrenheit
Pollination RequirementsSelf-pollinate when your flytrap is blooming; move pollen from anthers to center stigma for pollination
Harvesting Venus Flytrap SeedsIf pollination was successful, black seeds will appear and should be plucked from the plant. Harvest and sow as soon as possible
Grow from Cuttings/Propagation?Yes!
Things to NoteVenus flytrap seeds get less potent as they age, so be sure to plant them as soon as you can!

Venus Flytrap Seeds: What They Look Like

Venus Flytrap Seeds
If you want your own venus flytrap plant to produce seeds, you may need to be a little bit involved in the process.

©RECEP_OZTURK/Shutterstock.com

Have you ever seen a Venus flytrap flower, or better yet, a Venus flytrap that has gone to seed? These unique carnivorous plants do indeed self-pollinate with a bit of help, and their seeds are a beautiful glossy black. They produce many in a single flower, enough for you to grow as many Venus fly traps as you want with proper care. 

If you want your own venus flytrap plant to produce seeds, you may need to be a little bit involved in the process. They often can’t self-pollinate entirely on their own, but you won’t know whether or not you are successful until you see these black seeds appear. Whether you want to grow your own Venus flytraps from seed or want to harvest seeds for your friends, here’s how to accomplish both of those things. 

Germinating and Growing Venus Flytraps from Seed

Venus Flytrap Seeds
You will want to make sure that your venus flytrap seeds aren’t drowning in water, but they do need plenty of moisture to germinate.

©MelliwCR/Shutterstock.com

Before you grow your own venus flytrap plants, it’s important to purchase seeds that were recently harvested. Keep this in mind while you shop, as reputable Venus flytrap producers should be aware of this. Once you have your seeds procured, here’s how to plant and care for them:

  • Choose a unique mixture of soil. You can’t grow Venus flytraps in standard potting soil, as most commercially distributed dirt has minerals and other harmful substances that will harm Venus flytrap plants. Create your own mixture out of perlite, silica sand, and peat moss for best results. 
  • Create a unique container perfect for germinating Venus flytraps. You’ll want a plastic container with holes in the bottom and a lid that ventilates in order to properly germinate your venus flytrap seeds. They require high levels of humidity and moisture, but you want to ensure that there is still ventilation so that they do not mold. 
  • Sow your Venus flytrap seeds directly on top of your soil mixture. Make sure to never bury your Venus flytrap seeds, as they require light in order to germinate properly. Simply set them atop your soil mixture and leave them be! 
  • Gently mist your seeds, or leave them in a small tray of water to soak up the moisture. You will want to make sure that your venus flytraps aren’t drowning in water, but they do need plenty of moisture to germinate.
  • Keep your seeds at 75 degrees Fahrenheit, but no more than 90 degrees Fahrenheit. You may want to use a heat mat or other form of plant heater so that your venus flytraps germinate properly. You should also keep them in a location that gets bright but in direct sunlight, or simply use a grow light. 
  • Once your seedlings appear, remove the lid on your growing container. This will help prevent further moisture damage or mold from forming, and it will ensure that your seeds grow larger! 

Harvesting Venus Flytrap Seeds: Pollination Requirements

Venus Flytrap Seeds
You won’t know whether or not you have succeeded until after your flower has died, so attempting to pollinate your venus flytrap multiple times is a good idea.

©iStock.com/Karin de Mamiel

If your venus flytrap plants flower, you can help them along and create more seeds for planting. However, Venus flytraps don’t always produce seeds on their own, so here’s how you can accomplish it:

  • Wait until your venus flytrap has flowered and there is pollen on the anthers. You may need to brush up on your plant anatomy, but the anthers are typically located within the flower, surrounding a central stalk known as the stigma.
  • Move pollen from the anthers to the stigma using a cotton swab or toothpick. It may not feel like you are doing much, but simply touching a toothpick or cotton swab to any of the anthers on your venus flytrap plant is one of the best ways to help pollinate your plant. After touching the anthers, touch the center of the flower or the stigma with the same toothpick or cotton swab. You are essentially moving pollen from the anthers to the stigma, which is how Venus flytraps are pollinated. 
  • Repeat the process a couple more times, just to be sure. You won’t know whether or not you have succeeded until after your flower has died, so attempting to pollinate your venus flytrap multiple times is a good idea. You’ll know if you were successful after the flower dies and leaves behind multiple black seeds for you to harvest! 
  • Remove the seeds and utilize them as soon as possible. You don’t need to stratify or store your venus flytrap seeds for a later date for best results. In fact, using them immediately means they are at their most viable and most likely to germinate! 

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The Featured Image

Carnivorous plant, Venus flytrap, in a garden in Sydney, Australia.
Carnivorous plant, Venus flytrap, in a garden in Sydney, Australia.
© iStock.com/Karin de Mamiel

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About the Author

I am a non-binary freelance writer working full-time in Oregon. Graduating Southern Oregon University with a BFA in Theatre and a specialization in creative writing, I have an invested interest in a variety of topics, particularly Pacific Northwest history. When I'm not writing personally or professionally, you can find me camping along the Oregon coast with my high school sweetheart and Chihuahua mix, or in my home kitchen, perfecting recipes in a gleaming cast iron skillet.

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Sources
  1. Micropropagation of Venus fly trap by shoot culture, Available here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1021203811457
  2. Venus Flytrap: How an Excitable, Carnivorous Plant Works, Available here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1360138517302807