Meet The 5 Cutest Pigs In The World

Written by Jennifer Gaeng
Updated: May 12, 2023
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There are at least 14 recognized breeds of “mini pigs”.

Both purebred and hybrid pigs come in a wide range of sizes and forms. In the animal realm, small stature is typically connected with endearing qualities. The sight of a small pig can be shocking because this animal is commonly associated with a large size, stout build, and messy disposition. The small pig population is particularly diverse, with at least 14 recognized pure breeds of “mini pigs.” Some are widely known while others have almost vanished from the face of the earth. Keep in mind that cuteness is relative, but today’s article will introduce you to five of the cutest pigs in the world, all of which are considered “mini pigs!” Don’t be too surprised when you see how big these pigs can actually get.

1. American Mini Pig

mini pig

Cute newborn American mini pig sitting on human’s hands.

©Evgenia Voynarovskaya/Shutterstock.com

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The American Mini Pig is a hybrid breed created by crossing several different pig breeds over time. Given that American Mini Pigs were created with the express intent of being kept as pets or companions, health and behavior are the most crucial characteristics of the breed. The American Mini Pig is smaller in stature than other varieties. Nonetheless, American Mini Pigs can grow to a robust 20–30 inches in length, making them suited for both indoor and outdoor living. That’s just right for a piglet!

Pigs of varying sizes are adored, as long as they are healthy, strong, and athletically built. In addition, ensuring they can run and jump around unencumbered by physical limitations. The American Mini Pig is one of the most colorful and markedly different pig breeds because of the wide range of species that go into its genetic makeup. This makes it one of the cutest pigs in the world.

2. Pot-Bellied Pig

Potbelly pig with babies

Pot-Bellied pigs are known for their big bellies and make great pets for the right owner.

©Wendy M. Simmons/Shutterstock.com

The first thing you need to realize is that there is no one unique breed of Pot Belly pigs. The domesticated Pot-Bellied pig, commonly known as the Chinese Pot Belly Pig, Asian Pot Belly Pig, or Vietnamese Pot Belly Pig, is said to have originated in Southeast Asia. To create the Pot Bellied Pig “breed,” at least 15 distinct local “breed types” were used.

These pot-bellied pigs are typically only found in Mountainous areas in China, Vietnam, and Thailand. However, there are some “local breeds” now widely dispersed. Despite the fact that these local types have been demonstrated to share several noticeable physical traits, they are not particularly connected genetically.

3. The Kune Kune

Kune Kune Pig
Kune Kune boar pigs are another popular domestic pig breed.

The Kune Kune pig is one of the cutest pigs in the world. It originates in New Zealand and is a domestic pig breed. It is possible for kune kune to have wattles dangling from their lower jaws, and they have a hairy, plump appearance. The Kune Kune’s hair, which can be either long or short, straight or wavy, covers its entire body. They have a hairy, plump appearance. The Kune Kune can be found in a wide variety of colors, including black and white, cream, ginger, gold-tip, brown, black, and multicolor. They are sociable and easy to train, making them suitable as pets. 

Its ears are either semi-lopped or pierced, and its snout is medium to short and upturned. It has a small head, a round body, and short legs. The average height of a Kune Kune is roughly 24 inches. Males tend to be bigger than females, however, both sexes can reach weights of up to 440 pounds!

4. Juliana Pig

Juliana Piglet

Juliana pigs can weigh anywhere from 40 to 80 pounds.

©Joe Herlong/Shutterstock.com

It is commonly accepted that Juliana pigs are the tiniest pigs in the world. A little pig with bright spots, the Juliana is a sight to behold. As opposed to the Pot Belly Pig, it seems more like a little version of a huge hog or feral pig. They typically have a lean, longer-than-tall build. There is no excuse for Juliana ever to seem flabby, wrinkly, or slow. Dependent on their food, a healthy Juliana Pig can weigh anywhere from 40 to 80 pounds. A full-grown Juliana who weighs only 15–20 pounds is probably malnourished.

5. The Gottingen Mini Pig

Gottingen Mini Pig

Gottingen minipig (

Sus scrofa domesticus

) is a domestic animal bred by German researchers in the 1960s.

©iStock.com/wrangel

Around 1960, German researchers began breeding the first Gottingen mini pigs in an effort to produce a consistently small, easily handled pig for use in biomedical research. The Gottingen originated from crossing Minnesota micro pigs, Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs, and German Landrace pigs. The first Gottingen micropigs appeared on pet store shelves around 2010.

The average height of a Gottingen mini pig is between 10 and 20 inches. Their typical weight is around 60 pounds; however, this might vary from sex to sex and diet to diet. Despite their continued usage in scientific studies, many people keep Gottingen micropigs as pets due to their small size, ease of care, and pleasant demeanor.

In Conclusion

Many people search all over the web to find pictures of mini pigs or micro pigs, some even seek to adopt them as pets. However, it is important to keep in mind that even the smallest domestic pig type might not be as small as one would hope once fully grown.

Thus, if you want a pet pig so small it fits in a teacup, you’ll need to change your expectations. There is no such thing as a pig the size of a teacup. A fully grown pig, even the tiniest one, will weigh at least 40 pounds. A smaller size indicates it’s still a baby or, more tragically, malnourished.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © Rita_Kochmarjova/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Jennifer Gaeng is a writer at A-Z-Animals focused on animals, lakes, and fishing. With over 15 years of collective experience in writing and researching, Jennifer has honed her skills in various niches, including nature, animals, family care, and self-care. Hailing from Missouri, Jennifer finds inspiration in spending quality time with her loved ones. Her creative spirit extends beyond her writing endeavors, as she finds joy in the art of drawing and immersing herself in the beauty of nature.

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