Types of Boxer Dogs

Written by Heather Ross
Updated: September 13, 2022
Image Credit iStock.com/Annet Oldenkamp
Share this post on:

Key Points:

  • The German Boxer, originally bred to guard and bull-bait, is known as the “official” Boxer.
  • The American Boxer is mixed between German and Austrian imports. The English boxer has a smaller snout than the German boxer and is overall the smallest of the boxer breed.
  • Many Boxers- such as the brindle, white, black, and fawn- are classified by their markings.
  • The Boxador is a cuddly mix between a Boxer and a Labrador Retriever.

The Boxer is a popular mastiff-type Molosser dog breed in the United States, Germany, and the UK, and one of the top dog breeds in the United States. Different types are depending on the country of origin, colors, and any mixes. However, they all have similar ancestors and temperaments. Read on to learn about different types of boxers dogs and their color.

1. German Boxer

The German boxer was originally bred as a guard dog.

iStock.com/Ibrakovic

The German boxer or European boxer is a medium to large-sized shorthaired dog. Males have an average height of 22.4 to 24.8 inches and females have an average height of 20.9 and 23.2 inches. Males have an average weight of 66lbs and females have an average weight of 55 pounds. A German boxer puppy weighs between nine to 15 pounds at eight weeks and is considered fully grown between 12 to 18 months of age. It has an average lifespan of nine to 12 years.

15,799 People Couldn't Ace This Quiz

Think You Can?

The type of boxer was the first, oldest, and what some say is the only “official” boxer dog. It is the largest and stockiest of the three breeds. Originally bred as a guard dog and bull-baiting dog in the 19th century, it later became butcher’s helpers to control cattle in slaughterhouses. It is descended from the English Bulldog, Mastiff, the now-extinct Bullenbeisser or German bulldog, which was a hunting dog, and probably also Great Dane and a terrier. The length between its snout and skull has a ratio of 1:2, which is wider than the English boxer. Fawn and Brindle are the breed standard’s acceptable colors.

2. American Boxer

The American boxer became a registered dog in 1904.

iStock.com/Betty4240

The American boxer is a medium to large-sized shorthaired dog. Males have an average height of 22 to 25 inches and females have an average height of 21 to 24 inches. Males weigh between 60 to 80 pounds and females weigh 50 to 65 pounds. There can be short and stocky and tall and lean variations. An American boxer puppy weighs between nine to 15 pounds at eights weeks and is considered fully grown between 12 to 18 months of age. It has an average lifespan of nine to 12 years.

The American boxer was registered in 1904. When the American Boxer Club was formed in 1935, the original American boxer had German basic stock with additional German and Austrian imports to create a unique breed standard. It is smaller and leaner than the German boxer and has a snout-to-skull ratio of 1:3, with a snout that is larger than the German boxer. Fawn, Brindle, and Reverse Brindle (Black) are the breed standard’s acceptable colors.

3. English Boxer

The English boxer is the smallest of the boxer breeds.

Raven Imagery/Shutterstock.com

The English boxer, British boxer, or UK boxer is a medium to large-sized shorthaired dog. Males have an average height of 22.5 to 25 inches and females have an average height of 21 to 23 inches. Males weigh between 66 to 70 pounds and females weigh 55 to 60 pounds. An English boxer puppy weighs between nine to 15 pounds at eight weeks and is considered fully grown between 12 to 18 months of age. It has an average lifespan of nine to 12 years.

The English boxer is the smallest of the boxer breeds and is considered to be the most elegant. Its body is slender, graceful, and athletic, with thinner and shorter legs. It has a snout-to-skull ratio of 1:3 and its snout is thinner than that of the German boxer.

4. Brindle Boxer

Brindle is one of the original colors of boxers.

iStock.com/AprilCarlsonPhotography

Brindle is considered to be one of two original standard colors besides the Fawn. It is a subtle color striping, typically of very dark brown or black on a red base, although purebred boxers can’t produce truly black fur. The brindle-colored dog may have a blue hue or be reddish-brown, similar to the Fawn shade.

Brindle boxers can be classified based on shade and the coat color. The stripes may also be dark or light. Tiger brindle, mahogany brindle, and reverse brindle-these are the three types. Some brindles even have white markings, which are deemed “flashy” brindles.

5. Fawn Boxer

Fawn is also one of the original colors of boxers.

iStock.com/michael_lofenfeld

Fawn is one of the other original standard colors besides Brindle. Fawn is a reddish-brown color. Some fawn-colored boxers have white markings on their chest and paws so they are known as fawn and white boxers.

6. Black or Reverse Brindle Boxer

This coloring on a boxer is very rare.

iStock.com/Richard Paoli

This color of the boxer is advertised as rare. Black is not one of the standard acceptable colors, but it does appear among all three breeds. It’s the appearance of a black color, such as a very dark brown rather than being a true black for boxers. Also called reverse brindle, it is a heavy, dark brindle of very dark brown or fawn brindle on a very dark brown base. The coloring is lighter and more pronounced against the base as opposed to a traditional brindle.

7. White Boxer

White boxers are thought to have more health problems than those of other colors.

iStock.com/Amanda Woldt Photography

White is not one of the standard acceptable colors, but it does appear among all three breeds. Although some breeders think white boxers have more health problems and are inferior to brindle and fawn boxers, it is a purebred color and might one day be accepted in the AKC.

8. Boxador

The Boxador is a mix between a Boxer and Labrador Retriever.

Ashleycd1/Shutterstock.com

There are several boxer mixes people have created, including some popular hybrids. The Boxador is one of the most common, beloved types of boxer mixes around. This crossbreed inherits a large size from both parents and the unique appearance and personality traits of both, making for a loyal, loving, active, friendly, silly, and people-pleasing dog that gets along with children and other pets. It is also easy to train, although it is prone to separation anxiety. Its lifespan is greater than the purebred boxer with an average of 12 to 15 years.

The Boxer Temperament

Regardless of the different types of boxers dogs, the boxer temperament among all three breeds or bloodlines is energetic, social, affectionate, brave, intelligent, independent, and silly personality. It is however normal for a boxer puppy to be shy or unsure of surroundings due to inexperience. According to the breed standard, aggression towards other dogs is not considered a fault and it is not recommended to have this breed alone or unsupervised with other dogs.

As you can see, there are different types of boxers dogs including the three breeds or bloodlines of American boxer, German boxer, and English boxer, the fawn, brindle, black and white colors, and boxer mixes. Although there is just one standard boxer dog breed, there are slight differences between the three and larger differences between the purebreds and the mixes.

Summary of Boxer Dogs

1 German Boxer
2American Boxer
3English Boxer
4Brindle Boxer
5Fawn Boxer
6Black or Reverse Brindle Boxer
7White Boxer

Up Next…

If you enjoyed discovering the many types of Boxers, you’ll surely want to know about these types of breeds too!

Ready to discover the top 10 cutest dog breeds in the entire world?

How about the fastest dogs, the largest dogs and those that are -- quite frankly -- just the kindest dogs on the planet? Each day, AZ Animals sends out lists just like this to our thousands of email subscribers. And the best part? It's FREE. Join today by entering your email below.

What's the right dog for you?

Dogs are our best friends but which breed is your perfect match?

X-Small
Small
Medium
Large
Xtra-Large

If you have kids or existing dogs select:

Kids
Other Dogs

Should they be Hypoallergenic?

Yes
No
How important is health?
Which dog groups do you like?
How much exercise should your dog require?
What climate?
How much seperation anxiety?
How much yappiness/barking?

How much energy should they have?

The lower energy the better.
I want a cuddle buddy!
About average energy.
I want a dog that I have to chase after constantly!
All energy levels are great -- I just love dogs!
How much should they shed?
How trainable/obedient does the dog need to be?
How intelligent does the dog need to be?
How much chewing will allow?
boxer laying on a table outside
boxer laying on a table outside
iStock.com/Annet Oldenkamp
Share this post on:
About the Author

Heather Ross is a secondary English teacher and mother of 2 humans, 2 tuxedo cats, and a golden doodle. In between taking the kids to soccer practice and grading papers, she enjoys reading and writing about all the animals!

Thank you for reading! Have some feedback for us? Contact the AZ Animals editorial team.