12 Chicken Breeds Best for Hot Climates

Written by Kayeleen Parsons
Updated: June 9, 2023
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Chickens are incredibly versatile, as they can adapt to many different environments. However, a few chickens adapt better to a warmer climate than other chicken breeds. Therefore, when selecting chickens for your herd, it’s vital to consider choosing a location that bests suits how they can handle the temperatures around them.

If you reside in an area where the heat doesn’t subside, look no further, as you can choose from twelve different types of chickens that will withstand a sweltering temperature.

1. Orpington

Buff Orpington chickens hens roosters

The Orpington is a large breed that comes in a variety of colors that range from different blue and brown tones.

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©Racheal Carpenter/Shutterstock.com

The Orpington chicken originated from Southeast England and was bred in the nineteenth century by William Cook of Orpington. The Orpington is a large breed that comes in a variety of colors that range from different blue and brown tones. These birds are fruitful as they typically lay an incredible amount of 190 earthy-colored eggs yearly. Also seen at various bird shows.

2. Easter egger

The Easter egger can lay different colored eggs giving you choices of blue, green, and pink.

©Racheal Carpenter/Shutterstock.com

This hybrid breed of chicken originated in America. This bird is one of the most famous lawn breeds since it can handle warm temperatures and produce 280 eggs annually. What makes these chickens so phenomenal is that they can lay different colored eggs giving you choices of blue, green, and pink.

3. Barred Plymouth Rock

Plymouth rock chickens are easily identified as their feathers display a black-and-white striped pattern.

©Jennifer de Graaf/Shutterstock.com

Plymouth Rock originated in Massachusetts at the end of World War 2. These birds were prevalent amongst the population as they provided people with eggs and meat. They are easily identified as their feathers display a black-and-white striped pattern. However, they might look a bit intimidating because of their size but don’t fret, as they are very friendly and obedient.

4. Rhode Island Red

The

Rhode Island

Red chicken is one of the most productive egg-laying chickens, creating up to 300 eggs each year.

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The Rhode Island Red adjusted toward the northeastern areas of the United States, where it can endure both cold and hot temperatures. This beautiful-looking reddish-hued bird is one of the most productive egg-laying chickens, creating up to 300 eggs each year. If you are new to the chicken industry, the Rhode Island Red is a good chicken variety for you to consider.

5. Welsummer

The Welsummer chicken is extremely durable.

©Katrin Friedl Fotografie/Shutterstock.com

The Welsummer chicken derived its name from the village of Welsum. Welsum, found in the Netherlands, began breeding this bird with other breeds in 1880. Namely, partridge cochin, Rhode Island Red, and Barnevelder.These birds produced large brown eggs. This mixture of species makes this bird extremely durable.

6. White Leghorn

White leghorn chickens are popular in large numbers in England, Canada, Australia, and the United States.

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This chicken breed originated in Italy and is the only Mediterranean breed of importance today. The White Leghorn chicken is more popular than all other Leghorns combined as it is the leading egg producer in the world, laying nearly 320 white eggs per year. They are popular in large numbers in England, Canada, Australia, and the United States.

7. Brahmas

Brahma chickens were imported from

China

and became known as “Shanghai” birds.

©Adrian Eugen Ciobaniuc/Shutterstock.com

There are many conflicting stories about where Brahma chickens originated from. However, it is generally accepted that their birthplace is in the United States.
Around 1853, these chickens were imported from China and became known as “Shanghai” birds.

8. Andalusians

Andalusians have a single crest and come in various colors

©Pegasene/Shutterstock.com

Andalusians are initially from Andalusia, Spain – a rare Mediterranean breed that comes in standard sizes. They have a single crest and come in various colors but are generally white with grey and black feathers or dark and light grey feathers.

9. Fayoumi

Fayoumi chickens are slowly but surely gaining popularity in the

United States

.

©Sudut Juang/Shutterstock.com

The Fayoumi chicken originated in Middle Egypt, in the Faiyum oasis. Fayoumi, primarily bred near the Nile. Meanwhile, they are slowly but surely gaining popularity in the United States. Today, these chickens supply mainly eggs.

10. New Hampshire Red

The

New Hampshire

red chicken is a dual-purpose chicken that is used for eggs and meat.

©Jesper Frehr/Shutterstock.com

The New Hampshire Red is an American breed of chicken. Developed in the early twentieth century in New Hampshire by selective breeding of Rhode Island Red. Self-sufficient and raised in cages or free-range. It is a dual-purpose chicken that is used for eggs and meat.

11. Sumatra

The Sumatran chicken was initially imported from Sumatra in 1847.

©jdeesphotos/Shutterstock.com

The Sumatran is a breed of chicken that originated from the island of Sumatra in Indonesia. Initially imported from Sumatra in 1847 as fighting cocks for entertainment in the United States and Europe.

12. Minorca

The Menorca chicken is a well-known show bird used for egg production in many countries.

©Jane Nadezhina/Shutterstock.com

The Minorca chicken originated in Spain in the 1780s. Named after the island of Minorca. Considered the largest and heaviest of Mediterranean poultry breeds. The Menorca chicken is a well-known show bird used for egg production in many countries.

How Do Chickens Stay Cool?

These birds can handle a hot climate because they can stretch their wings away from their bodies so that the air can circulate under their wings and their body heat can escape. Panting with their mouths open also causes heat to escape from their bodies. So if you see your chickens panting or spreading their wings, it’s nothing to worry about as they are just cooling off. Sure, they’re hot, but they can handle it.

Some guidelines to keep your chicken cool:

  • Provide them with shallow bowls of cool water, with additional ice blocks if possible. Paddling pools are cheap, and several chickens can use them simultaneously.
  • Put a screen on the door of your coop. You should install a mesh door if you have a walk-in chicken coop. The screen will allow your chickens to ventilate much better.
  • Refrigerate their feed. You can also put the food in the freezer for about two hours before serving. An excellent meal will stimulate them to eat while lowering their body temperature from the inside.
  • Ensure their environment has shady areas where they can rest and cool off during these heightened temperatures.

Summary of 12 Chicken Breeds Best for Hot Climates

#Chicken BreedCountry of Origin
1OrpingtonEngland
2Easter eggerUnited States
3Barred Plymouth RockUnited States
4Rhode Island RedUnited States
5WelsummerNetherlands
6White LeghornItaly
7BrahmasChina
8AndalusiansSpain
9FayoumiEgypt
10New Hampshire RedUnited States
11SumatraIndonesia
12MinorcaSpain

The photo featured at the top of this post is © Pegasene/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Kayeleen Parsons is a writer at A-Z Animals that thoroughly enjoys writing about animals of all types. She has a love for many animals, but her Cocker Spaniel dog holds a special place in her heart. In addition to being a writer, she's also an English teacher, sharing her knowledge to help her students become excellent in the language and literature. When she's not busy writing, Kayeleen enjoys reading and spending quality time with her family in her homeland of Cape Town.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) 

How do chickens survive the heat?

These birds can handle hot climates because they stretch their wings away from their bodies, so air can circulate under the wings allowing body heat to escape.

How to keep chickens cool in high heat?

  • Provide shallow bowls of cool water
  • install a mesh door on your chicken’s coop, allowing the area to be well ventilated
  • refrigerate your chicken’s feed
  • provide a shady area so they can rest and cool off

Thank you for reading! Have some feedback for us? Contact the AZ Animals editorial team.

Sources
  1. know your chickens, Available here: https://www.knowyourchickens.com/heat-hardy-chickens/
  2. lives stock conservancy, Available here: https://livestockconservancy.org/heritage-breeds/heritage-breeds-list/rhode-island-red-chicken/
  3. purina mills, Available here: https://www.purinamills.com/chicken-feed/education/detail/summer-flock-care-how-to-keep-chickens-cool