Schnoodle vs Schnauzer: 5 Key Differences

Written by August Buck
Published: April 18, 2022
Image Credit cynoclub/Shutterstock.com
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When it comes to comparing dog breeds, do you know all of the differences between a schnoodle vs schnauzer? Both of these dogs are extremely loyal, but what other similarities might they share, and what traits separate them from one another? 

In this article, we will address all of the differences between schnoodles and schnauzers, including their appearances and ancestral differences. We will also discuss their individual behaviors and life spans so that you can understand both of these dog breeds in totality. Let’s get started and talk about these dogs now! 

Comparing Schnoodle vs Schnauzer

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer
The schnoodle is smaller in both height and weight than the average schnauzer.

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SchnoodleSchnauzer
Size10-26 inches tall; 15-75 pounds10-28 inches tall; 10-85 pounds
AppearanceCurly and coarse fur, though they can also be silky and straight. Found in a variety of colors with floppy ears. Colors include black, gray, white, silver, apricot.Smooth and coarse fur with distinct fur around their eyes and chin. Appears as if they have eyebrows and a beard. Found in a variety of colors including gray, black, cream, and a salt and pepper appearance
AncestryA combination of a Schnauzer and a Poodle; bred as a designer dog recentlyWorking dog breed from the 15th century in Germany; bred for hunting rodents
BehaviorFriendly and loyal to their family, but may have a stubborn streak depending on breedingFocused and loyal, capable of working hard. Alert and capable, but can be wary of strangers due to their protective nature
Lifespan12-16 years10-16 years

Key Differences Between Schnoodle vs Schnauzer

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer
The fur of the schnoodle ranges from curly to coarse, while schnauzers have smooth and coarse fur.

Liliya Kulianionak/Shutterstock.com

There are many key differences between schnoodles and schnauzers. The schnoodle is smaller in both height and weight than the average schnauzer. The fur of the schnoodle ranges from curly to coarse, while schnauzers have smooth and coarse fur. While the schnauzer is a breed that originated in the 15th century, the schnoodle is a relatively recent designer breed of dog.

Let’s discuss all of these differences in more detail now. 

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer: Size

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer
While the schnauzer is a breed that originated in the 15th century, the schnoodle is a relatively recent designer breed of dog.

Peter Galleghan/Shutterstock.com

Both schnoodles and schnauzers have three different sizes of dog, depending on the breed. For example, you can get a schnauzer in a miniature version, a standard version, and a giant version. The same can be said for the schnoodle, though the average schnauzer is larger than the schnoodle, no matter the specific breed size. Let’s take a look at those figures in more detail now. 

The average schnoodle ranges in height from 10-26 inches, depending on breed, while the average schnauzer reaches anywhere from 10-28 inches tall. Additionally, schnauzers weigh anywhere from 10-85 pounds depending on breed, while schnoodles reach 15-75 pounds. This is less than the average schnauzer.

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer: Appearance

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer
The average schnoodle ranges in height from 10-26 inches, depending on breed, while the average schnauzer reaches anywhere from 10-28 inches tall.

everydoghasastory/Shutterstock.com

The appearance of the schnoodle differs from the appearance of the schnauzer, though it depends on how much poodle DNA the schnoodle receives. Schnoodles and schnauzers can look very similar, depending on their breeding and specific genetics. However, schnoodles have a variety of different coat styles, while schnauzers only come in a straight and coarse fur type. Let’s discuss more of their physical appearances in more detail now. 

Schnauzers are easily identified by their eyebrows and bearded appearance, while schnoodles maintain a regular first appearance in their faces. Additionally, schnauzers only come in black, gray, white, and salt and pepper colorings, while schnoodles are found in a variety of other colors depending on breeding.

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer: Ancestry and Breeding

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer
Schnauzers are easily identified by their eyebrows and bearded appearance, while schnoodles maintain a regular first appearance in their faces.

yhelfman/Shutterstock.com

The ancestry and breeding of both of these dogs differ greatly from one another. The schnoodle is a relatively new designer dog breed, while schnauzers date back to the 15th century in Germany. This means that the reasons these dogs were bred differ from one another as well. Let’s talk about these differences in more detail now.

The schnauzer was originally bred to hunt rodents and be a working dog, while the schnoodle was bred as a designer and hypoallergenic dog for companionship. It is unclear when the schnoodle was first bred, but it is a much more recent dog breed compared to the schnauzer.

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer: Behavior

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer
The schnoodle is a relatively new designer dog breed, while schnauzers date back to the 15th century in Germany.

There are some behavioral differences between the schnauzer and the schnoodle, though it depends on how much poodle DNA a schnoodle receives. For example, the schnauzer is well known for its loyalty and alertness, while the schnoodle is more playful and friendly overall. Additionally, the schnauzer is extremely protective and can be very wary of strangers, while the schnoodle is more welcoming to strangers.

An important thing to note about both of these dogs is that their giant breeds can be stubborn and difficult to control. The giant schnauzer is the most guilty of this behavior, though the schnoodle can also be stubborn, depending on how much schnauzer DNA it has.

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer: Lifespan

Schnoodle vs Schnauzer
On average, schnoodles live anywhere from 12-16 years, while schnauzers live anywhere from 10-16 years.

Nicole Klein/Shutterstock.com

A final difference between the schnoodle and the schnauzer is their lifespans. While both of these dogs have miniature, standard, and giant counterparts, the schnoodle lives a slightly longer life than the average schnauzer. However, it truly depends on the size of the dog as well as the individual health of the animal.

On average, schnoodles live anywhere from 12-16 years, while schnauzers live anywhere from 10-16 years. Giant breeds of both of these dogs live the least amount of time, while miniature and standard versions live the longest.

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About the Author

I am a non-binary freelance writer working full-time in Oregon. Graduating Southern Oregon University with a BFA in Theatre and a specialization in creative writing, I have an invested interest in a variety of topics, particularly Pacific Northwest history. When I'm not writing personally or professionally, you can find me camping along the Oregon coast with my high school sweetheart and Chihuahua mix, or in my home kitchen, perfecting recipes in a gleaming cast iron skillet.