Raggle

Canis lupus

Last updated: April 26, 2021
Verified by: AZ Animals Staff

Raggles are known for their energy and curiosity.



Raggle Scientific Classification

Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Mammalia
Order
Carnivora
Family
Canidae
Genus
Canis
Scientific Name
Canis lupus

Raggle Conservation Status

Raggle Locations

Raggle Locations

Raggle Facts

Fun Fact
Raggles are known for their energy and curiosity.
Temperament
Strong-willed and energetic
Diet
Omnivore

Raggle Physical Characteristics

Colour
  • Brown
  • Black
  • White
  • Cream
Skin Type
Hair
Lifespan
12 to 15 years
Weight
20 lbs

Raggle as a Pet:

General Health
Energy Level
Shedability
Trainability
Intelligence
Tendency to Chew
Size
Family and kid friendliness
Yappiness / Barking
Moderate
Seperation Anxiety
High
Preferred Temperature
Warm climate
Exercise Needs
High
Friendly With Other Dogs
Poor
Pure bred cost to own
$450
Dog group
Non-sporting
Male weight
10-20 lbs
Female weight
9-19 lbs

Raggle Images

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Raggles are alert to everything in their environment making them excellent watchdogs.

Breed a Rat Terrier with a Beagle and you get a Raggle. A Raggle is one of many so-called designer dogs. Two popular dogs are bred to get a puppy that possesses the best qualities of each breed. Raggles are energetic, alert, and friendly. It’s not clear when the Raggle came on the scene, but it belongs to a growing group of dogs known as hybrids.

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Raggles are good watchdogs because they are alert and will bark if they spot someone on the property. Raggles that are socialized as puppies are good with kids, but many don’t get along well with other dogs.

3 Pros and Cons of Owning Raggle

Pros!Cons!
Good with kids
A socialized Raggle has a friendly temperament and is good with children in a family.
Very energetic
Breed a lively Beagle with a Rat Terrier and you have a very energetic Raggle that needs at least 60 minutes of daily exercise.
An alert watchdog
These hybrid dogs are alert to their surroundings and will bark if someone approaches the house.
Tough to train
Though intelligent, this dog is easily distracted by all the scents and sights around it. So, obedience training can be challenging.
An easy grooming routine
An easy, quick grooming routine can keep this dog’s coat looking its best!
May bark a lot
A Raggle that has not been socialized since puppyhood may bark an inordinate amount. But this can be helped with extra training.
Raggle (Beagle Rat Terrier mix) hunting in the garden.
Raggle (Beagle Rat Terrier mix) hunting in the garden.

Raggle Size and Weight

An adult male Raggle can grow to be 12 inches tall, head to toe. A female Raggle grows as tall as 11 inches. In terms of weight, a male Raggle can weigh as much as 20 pounds while a female can be 19 pounds, fully grown. Raggle puppies at 9 weeks old weigh around 7 pounds and are fully grown at 18 months old.

Height (Male)12 inches tall
Height (Female)11 inches tall
Weight (Male)20 pounds, full-grown
Weight (Female)19 pounds, full-grown

Raggle Common Health Issues

Raggles have some common health issues such as Patellar luxation. Patellar luxation is a dislocated kneecap. A dog with this condition limps or hops especially while trying to run. Changes in diet, supplements, or surgery are all treatments for this condition. Elbow dysplasia is another common health issue of this hybrid pooch. Essentially, this condition happens when the elbow joint is out of place. It’s genetic but can be treated with surgery. Intervertebral disc disease is another health concern for a Raggle. This is when a disc in a dog’s spine ruptures. The treatment for this condition depends on how severe it is. Sometimes medication can help, or surgery may be needed.

Common health issues include:

Raggle Temperament and Behavior

One of a Raggle’s most significant traits is its intelligence. This is easy to believe knowing that its Beagle and Rat Terrier parents are both intelligent dogs. This hybrid has an energetic temperament and enjoys exploring its environment as well as playing games with its owner.

Health and Entertainment for your Raggle

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A socialized Raggle has a friendly personality and gets along with both children and adults. However, one thing to keep in mind is this dog has been known to show aggression to other dogs in a family. So, introducing a new Raggle to a household with dogs should be done with care.

How to Take Care of a Raggle

Taking care of a pet Raggle is much easier when an owner knows all about its dietary, grooming, exercise, and healthcare needs. All of these considerations should be factored into the overall care of a puppy or adult Raggle. Check out some specifics to keep in mind.

Raggle Food and Diet

Raggle adult dogs and puppies need different types of diets to keep them healthy. Look at some of the nutrients in their diets:

Puppy food: A nutrient called DHA supports the eye, brain, and bone health of a Raggle puppy. Protein helps to build strong muscles, joints, and cartilage. An adequate amount of protein can help to guard against Patellar luxation. Fat provides energy to this active hybrid. Vitamin C and E serve as antioxidants and build up a Raggle puppy’s immune system. Fatty acids give a puppy a healthy coat and contribute to a strong nervous system.

Adult dog food: Fiber in an adult Raggle’s diet helps with proper digestion. Protein helps in the growth of new tissue and repairs damaged tissue. Calcium along with vitamin D supports healthy bones which are especially beneficial in a dog prone to Patellar luxation and elbow dysplasia. A limited amount of fat in its diet keeps this dog full of energy without adding needless weight. Vitamin A supports healthy eyes and vision in an adult dog while vitamin C acts as an antioxidant guarding against illness.

Raggle Maintenance and Grooming

How much do these dogs shed? These hybrid dogs are sometimes called hypoallergenic. But they aren’t strictly hypoallergenic because they do shed a low amount of hair.

Their grooming routine is fairly low maintenance. They have a coat of short, straight hair. They should be brushed once a week to remove dead or loose hair. A slicker brush is a useful grooming tool because its pin bristles cover every area of a dog’s coat. Be sure the slicker brush has a coating on the tips of its bristles. This protects the dog’s skin as it’s being brushed. In addition, grooming this dog with a brush featuring boar’s hair bristles can also bring natural oils out making its coat shine! As a bonus, the boar’s hair bristles feel good as they move over this dog’s coat.

It’s important to include a Raggle’s ears in its grooming routine. Carefully clean the underside of each ear using a soft cloth and a cleaning solution designed for this purpose. This gentle cleaning removes dust, dirt, wax, and other material that could lead to an ear infection.

Some of these dogs suffer from environmental allergies to pollen, dust, or other floating debris. Brushing this dog once a week can help an owner to be aware of any signs of these allergies. Red or dry patches of skin can signal an environmental allergy. A qualified veterinarian can prescribe a topical ointment or other treatment for this type of allergy.

Raggle Training

Raggles are intelligent, strong-willed dogs. This combination can sometimes result in challenges during obedience training. In addition, this dog can be distracted by birds, squirrels, and other animals in the area. After all, its Rat Terrier and Beagle parents are both prey driven. So, it’s a good idea to keep the training sessions short and conduct them in an area with as few distractions as possible. Some Raggle owners train their dogs in a room in their home or take obedience training classes held inside a building. Treats and verbal praise also help this smart dog to learn all of its lessons.

An American Pit Bull Terrier is another example of a dog that is strong-willed and challenging (but not impossible) to train.

Raggle Exercise

These dogs have an energetic temperament. They need at least 60 minutes of exercise each day to stay healthy both physically and emotionally. Walking on a trail in the woods, playing fetch at a local park, or running around in a game of chase in the backyard are all great ways to exercise them. An area of open space such as a field or a wooded lot with plenty of scents is ideal for exercising this dog.

This dog is not a good choice for someone who lives in an apartment. Its active nature makes it better for someone with a home and a fenced-in yard.

Raggle Puppies

Believe it or not, the puppies are sometimes even more active than the adults! So, when dealing with puppies, make sure they have a safe place where they can explore and take in all the smells around them. Remember, these dogs have a tendency to take off after small animals, so a fenced-in area is best.

Raggle (Beagle Rat Terrier mix) puppy playing outside.
Raggle (Beagle Rat Terrier mix) puppy playing outside.

Raggle and Children

Socialized Raggles are good with children. If the dog has been around kids since puppyhood, then it should do very well in a family with kids of all ages.

Dogs Similar to Raggle

Other dogs similar to Raggles include the Smooth Fox Terrier, Poogle, and Yorkshire Terrier.

  • Smooth Fox Terrier – Smooth Fox Terriers and Raggles are about the same weight and both have an energetic temperament. But Smooth Fox Terriers are a little taller than Raggles.
  • Poogle – Poogles and Raggles share the same colors in their coat, and both are intelligent. However, Raggles are a little heavier than Poogles.
  • Yorkshire Terrier – Yorkies and Raggles both have a high prey drive and the same lifespan. But Raggles is heavier and taller than Yorkshire Terriers.

Some popular names for these dogs include:

  • Rosie
  • Ellie
  • Pickles
  • Peanut
  • George
  • Ranger
  • Cookie
  • Maggie
  • Jack

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Raggle FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) 

What is a Raggle?

Breed a Beagle and a Rat Terrier and you get a hybrid called a Raggle. Raggles are friendly, energetic, and intelligent. They have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. Socialized Raggles are good with kids but can be aggressive around other dogs if not introduced slowly.

How much does a Raggle cost to own?

The initial price of a Raggle from a breeder is around $450. Adopting a Raggle from an animal shelter or a rescue organization are other options for someone interested in this hybrid dog. Adopting is less costly than buying a Raggle from a professional breeder.

The yearly vet costs for this hybrid range from $200 to $400 depending on the services.

Food costs for a Raggle range from $15 to $30 per month.

Are Raggles good with kids?

Socialized Raggles are good with kids.

How long does a Raggle live?

The lifespan of a Raggle is 12 to 15 years.

How big will a Raggle get?

A male Raggle can be as tall as 12 inches while a female can reach 11 inches tall fully grown. An adult male Raggle weighs about 20 pounds whereas a female weighs up to 19 pounds.

Is a Raggle a good family dog?

A Raggle is a good family dog. As a note, sometimes Raggles are not friendly with other dogs. So, introducing a Raggle to another dog in the family should be done with care. Alternatively, a Raggle would be perfectly happy as the only dog in a household.

How long will a Raggle live?

A Raggle can live as long as 15 years or even longer if a family takes excellent care of their pet!

Do Raggles shed?

Though they are sometimes called hypoallergenic, Raggles do shed a small amount of hair.

Sources
  1. Rover, Available here: https://www.rover.com/blog/designer-dog-breeds/
  2. Wikipedia, Available here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beagle
  3. Wikipedia, Available here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat_Terrier

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