17 Birds That Spend Their Winters in Kansas

Written by Keyana Beamon
Published: November 28, 2023
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Nothing is better than hiking on a trail, spotting beautiful birds, and being one with nature. There are plenty of birds to see throughout Kansas, but what about during the winter? Many birds migrate in or out of Kansas; however, this article highlights common birds to visit in winter. You may find some of these birds in your backyard eating out of your bird feeder. Take the time to observe these beautiful birds and see which ones will bless you with their presence in winter.

1. European Starling

The European Starling birds are black with white dots. They also have a light purple and green coloration when observing in the light. These birds fly over fields and perch upon objects around Kansas.

Starling flock looking for food in the grass, north of Portugal (Focus on three of the birds)

European Starling’s average weight is 60-96 grams, growing to 23 centimeters long.

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©Zacarias da Mata/Shutterstock.com

2. American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch is a beautiful bird living in weedy fields and overgrown areas. These birds also hang around the suburbs and parks throughout Kansas. This bird is yellow, has a gray nape, and has black and white wings. Females are duller in color, and males are duller during the wintertime.

American Goldfinch Perched in the Tree Branches

The American Goldfinch’s average size is 11 to 13 centimeters and weighs 11 to 20 grams.

©rck_953/Shutterstock.com

3. Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker can be found hanging around streams and city parks. Although these birds can make a nuisance of noises, they eat the pesky insects we dislike. This type of woodpecker is generally black and white with a red patch at the top of its head.

Downy woodpecker searching through weeds for food

The Downy Woodpeckers’ size is between 14 and 17 centimeters, and they weigh between 21 and 28 centimeters.

©J Edwards Photography/Shutterstock.com

4. Red-bellied Woodpecker

The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a black and white bird with white undersides and a small red patch on its belly. Males have a red cap, whereas females are brown. These woodpeckers forage in woodlands, forests, and urban areas.

Red-bellied woodpecker enjoying a meal.

Red-bellied woodpeckers weigh between 56 and 91 grams and grow up to 24 centimeters.

©Connie Moore/Shutterstock.com

5. Dark-eyed Junco

The Dark-eyed Junco has a color variation of dark gray to brown and white outer tail feathers. They also have dark eyes, hence their name. This bird has a short beak for breaking open seeds. These birds can be found in Kansas’s forests, woodlands, and gardens.

Male Dark-eyed Junco in Winter

The average size of the Dark-eyed Junco is 14 to 16 centimeters and weighs between 18 to 30 grams.

©Brett Swain/Shutterstock.com

6. American Crow

The American Crow is the most well-known blackbird and has a “cawing” call. These birds hang around places, scavenging for food in woodlands, urban areas, and agricultural fields. These opportunistic birds are brilliant.

Juvenile blue-eyed American Crow perched

The average size for the American Crow is between 40 and 503 centimeters, weighing 620 grams.

©Elizabeth Caron/Shutterstock.com

7. Blue Jay

Blue Jays are intelligent and noisy birds living in woodlands, parks, and suburban areas. This bird has a blue upper body and grayish-white undersides. They also have black lines on their faces.

 Blue Jay Portrait in Early Spring on Brown Background

Blue Jays can grow up to 30 centimeters and weigh 110 grams.

©FotoRequest/Shutterstock.com

8. American Robin

The American Robin can be found in woodlands, forests, mountains, fields, and parks; however, they stay in wooded areas for nesting in winter. These birds have a black head and neck with a reddish-orange breast. American Robins eat earthworms, snails, fruit, and insects.

American robin, Turdus migratorius, single bird on branch with berries, British Columbia, Canada, December 2022

The average size for American Robins is between 20 and 28 centimeters long and weighs 77 to 85 grams.

©Erni/Shutterstock.com

9. Eurasian Collard Dove

The Eurasian Collard Dove is a plump bird with a grayish-brown coloration of its body. They also have a half-black collar around their neck, hence the name, and black feathered tips. You may see these birds in urban areas, gardens, and agricultural fields.

A pair of collared Doves feeding on fallen Niger seed below my apple tree at the bottom of my garden.

The Eurasian Collard Dove can grow up to 30 centimeters and weigh 180 grams.

©Bob the Book/Shutterstock.com

10. White-breasted Nuthatch

The White-breasted Nuthatch has a white face, belly, grayish back, and head. These birds’ habitats include deciduous forests, woodland edges, parks, and yards.

White breasted nuthatch clinging to a mullein in winter.

This beautiful bird’s average size is 13 to 14 centimeters long and weighs 18 to 30 grams.

©Jeff Caverly/Shutterstock.com

11. Western Meadowlark

The Western Meadowlark has a flat head and a slender bill. This bird has a yellow breast and throat with white and black wings. You can see a black “V” shape across the breast and collarbone in the proper lighting. These birds hang around grasslands, meadows, and pastures.

Western Meadowlark in Song

The average size of the Western Meadowlark is between 6.3 and 10.2 inches, weighing up to 115 grams.

©Jack Bell Photography/Shutterstock.com

12. Northern Cardinal

The Northern Cardinal is red with a cute black face. Females are pale brown with a reddish coloration of the wings, tail, and crest. You can spot these birds in dense shrubs, woodland edges, gardens, and parks.

Northern Cardinal is beautiful bird

The average size of the Northern Cardinal is between 21 and 23 centimeters and reaches a weight of 48 grams.

©Thomas Torget/Shutterstock.com

13. Canada Goose

The Canadian Goose is known for migrating; however, those that live in the northern states, such as Kansas, stay year-round. Canadian geese are typical birds around lakes, rivers, ponds, and urban parks. The Canada Goose’s body is brownish-gray with white cheeks and a black head.

Canada goose swimming on a sunny day

The Canadian Goose can weigh up to 15 pounds.

©Jean-Baptiste Toussaint/Shutterstock.com

14. Black-capped Chickadee

The Black-capped Chickadee bird has a grayish-brown body, white cheeks, and a black cap. These birds have a thin beak for eating certain seeds and insects. You can spot these birds in woodlands, forests, and suburban areas.

A very close shot (selective focus) of a Black-capped Chickadee in its habitat

The average size of the Black-capped Chickadee is between 12 and 15 centimeters long and weighs 9 to 14 grams.

©Manu M Nair/Shutterstock.com

15. Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a large woodpecker weighing between 110 and 160 grams. This bird is brown with black spots and has a red line on its nape and cheek. The red-shafted Northern Flicker is what you will see throughout Kansas.

Northern Flicker: Known for its "wick-a-wick-a-wick" call.

Northern Flicker’s average length is between 28 and 31 centimeters.

©g images.com/Shutterstock.com

16. Tufted Titmouse

The Tufted Titmouse bird has a grey back with white undersides. You may notice their wing feathers are black and grey. These beautiful little birds live in eastern Kansas’s city parks and deciduous forests.

tufted titmouse bird standing on tree branch in autumn

The average size of the Tufted Titmouse is between 14 and 16 centimeters long and can weigh up to 26 grams.

©ND700/Shutterstock.com

17. Rock Pigeon

Rock Pigeons are the grey birds you see foraging around cities in big flocks. The Rock Pigeon has orange feet and black bands across their wings. In the light, you may see a greenish-purple coloration on their necks.

rock pigeon (Columba livia), carefree walking gray pigeon

The Rock pigeon is typically between 11 and 13 inches long and weighs 30 to 36 grams.

©Jossfoto/Shutterstock.com

17 Common Birds You May See in Kansas During Winter.
1. European Starling
2. American Goldfinch
3. Downy Woodpecker
4. Red-bellied Woodpecker
5. Dark-eyed Junco
6. American Crow
7. Blue Jay
8. American Robin
9. Eurasian Collard Dove
10. White-breasted Nuthatch
11. Western Meadowlark
12. Northern Cardinal
13. Canada Goose
14. Black-capped Chickadee
15. Northern Flicker
16. Tufted Titmouse
17. Rock Pigeon
Seventeen beautiful birds may visit your bird feeder this winter in Kansas.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © KrisDurlen/Shutterstock.com


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About the Author

Keyana is a licensed veterinary technician who has been working with animals for more than 10 years. She has done a mixture of emergency, preventative, and shelter. She loves to mentor others and has recently started a podcast about the ins and outs of veterinary medicine. In her free time, she love to watch/read anything crime related, tend to her garden, try new foods, work on puzzles, and hangout with friends.

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