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Emu

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Emu Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Aves
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Casuariiformes
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Casuariidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Dromaius
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Dromaius Novaehollandiae
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Bird
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size (H):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
1.5m - 1.9m (4.9ft - 6.2ft)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
18kg - 60kg (40lbs - 132lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
40km/h (25mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
12 - 20 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Flock
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Black, Grey, Brown
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Feathers
Favourite Food:Fruit
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Open grasslands with bushes close to water
Average Clutch Size:
The average number of eggs laif at once
11
Main Prey:Fruit, Seeds, Insects, Flowers
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Wild dogs, Birds of prey
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Enormous body size and large eyes

Emu Location

Map of Emu Locations
Map of Oceania

Emu

The emu is the largest bird native to Australia and the second largest bird in the world, behind the ostrich. The emu is most commonly found in wooded areas but emus are common all over Australia.

Studies show that emus seem to avoid dense forests and largely populated areas, as this means that the emu can be more aware of it's surroundings. Although the emu does prefer to be in woodland or shrub land where there is plenty to eat as well as cover, they like to know exactly what is around them.

In Australia there are enormous emu farms where the emu is bred for meat, oil and leather. Emu oil is said to hold medicinal healing properties when rubbed onto painful joints and is commonly used across the world mainly for sports injuries but also arthritis.

Emus can grow to nearly 2 meters tall and have have extremely soft feathers. Emus are flightless birds mainly due to their enormous size, which means that they are just too heavy to fly. Emus are nomadic animals which means that they rarely stay in the same place for long. This travelling lifestyle means that the emu can make the most of the food that is available and emus are known to travel long distances in order to find more food.

Emus are omnivorous birds feeding mainly on fruits, seeds and insects. Emus are generally found close to water and are therefore not keen on more arid regions. However, the introduction of better water supplies to inland Australia has meant that despite the population decrease of the wild emu, their range has expanded.

Emus have long necks and long legs in comparison to their body size. The long, flexible legs of the emu mean that the emu is able to run a high speeds, with emus generally running at around 25 mph. Emus however are able to reach a top speed 30 mph in short bursts should the emu need to get away quickly from a dangerous situation.

Emus form breeding pairs during the Australian summer (December) and mating usually occurs when the climate becomes cooler a few months later. The female emu can lay up to 20 eggs (although 12 is the average number), which hatch after a couple of months. The male emu eats very little throughout the breeding process and it is he that incubates the eggs. By the time the emu chicks hatch, the male emu has lost a considerable amount of body weight and lives of his fat reserves.

Emus have few predators due to their large size and fast speed. Emus are most commonly preyed upon by wild dogs and crocodiles and are hunted by humans. Emu eggs are eaten by many animals including dogs, birds of prey and large reptiles.

Emus tend to live for between 10 and 20 years in the wild, although it is not uncommon for an emu to be more than 30 years old, particularly when in captivity. Emus are known to be very versatile animals and can easily adapt to many different environments.

Emu Comments

Alex Polovin
"Great story!!!!!!!!!!!"
bryce
"emus can be agressive"
Lynsey
"On Disney channel theres a show called ant farm (its not about ants) But they went to asturella and almost got atteked by emus. My mom grandma and aunt so them to walking down the street and we dont live close to austerlea"
liam
"very good i love the emu's face its one of the phew birds that cant fly but that would be awsome if the could :)"
jane obasi
"the emu is the 2 biggest bird in the world i like the article"
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First Published: 10th November 2008, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. Christopher Perrins, Oxford University Press (2009) The Encyclopedia Of Birds [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
2. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
3. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]

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