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Chinstrap Penguin

Chinstrap Penguin (Pygoscelis Antarcticus)Chinstrap Penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica)Chinstrap Penguin, Seal IslandChinstrap penguin rookery, Seal IslandChinstrap penguin and chicks, Seal IslandChinstrap Penguin (Pygoscelis Antarcticus)Chinstrap Penguin (Pygoscelis Antarcticus)
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Chinstrap Penguin Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Aves
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Sphenisciformes
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Spheniscidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Pygoscelis
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Pygoscelis Antarcticus
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Bird
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Carnivore
Size (H):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
60cm - 68cm (24in - 27in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
3kg - 6kg (6.6lbs - 13lbs)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
15 - 20 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Colony
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Black, White, Grey
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Feathers
Favourite Food:Krill
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Rocky Antarctic Islands
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
2
Main Prey:Krill, Fish, Shrimp
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Leopard Seal, Killer Whale, Sea Birds
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
White face and thin, black line that runs under the chin

Chinstrap Penguin Location

Map of Chinstrap Penguin Locations

Chinstrap Penguin

The chinstrap penguin is a small species of penguin which is found in habiting the rocky land and islands of the Antarctic Ocean. The chinstrap penguins name derives from the narrow black band under their heads.

Chinstrap penguins are one of the most easily identifiable of all of the penguin species, mainly due to the marking on their chins. Chinstrap penguins are also known to congregate together in their millions on small Antarctic islands. There are believed to be more than 7 million breeding pairs of chinstrap penguins.

Chinstrap penguins spend their lives hunting for krill and small fish and crustaceans in the surrounding waters, coming onto land to breed, rest and to escape the large ocean predators.

Chinstrap penguins are carnivorous birds, and catch numerous species of fish,, crabs, shrimp, squid and krill in their strong beaks. Parents hunt for food in the ocean to take back to their chicks on the land.

Due to the fact that there are few large animals inhabiting the frozen South Pole, the chinstrap penguin has few natural predators. Leopard seals, killer whales and the occasional passing shark are the main predators of the chinstrap penguin.

Female chinstrap penguins lay 2 eggs in a nest made out of stones on one of the rocky Antarctic islands, in November or December. The male chinstrap penguin and the female chinstrap penguin both take it in turns to keep the eggs warm, with the eggs hatching after about a month. The chicks stay in the nest until they are about a month old and are fed by both the female chinstrap penguin and the male chinstrap penguin.

Chinstrap Penguin Translations

Cesky
Tučňák uzdičkový
Deutsch
Zügelpinguin
English
Chinstrap Penguin
Español
Pygoscelis antarctica
Suomi
Myssypingviini
Français
Manchot à jugulaire
עִבְרִית
פינגווין רצועת הסנטר
Hrvatski
Ogrličasti pingvin
Magyar
Állszíjas pingvin
Italiano
Pygoscelis antarctica
日本語
ヒゲペンギン
Nederlands
Stormbandpinguïn
Norsk
Ringpingvin
Português
Pinguim-de-barbicha
Svenska
Ringpingvin
中文
南極企鵝

Chinstrap Penguin Comments

Izzy
"Your website helped a lot on are research progect !!!!!!!!!!"
claire
"this helped me study for my report on the chinstrap penguin"
Doreen Green
"an excellent bird"
Addison
"this will help me a lot"
Anonymous
"This helped me make a present for my teacher's birthday"
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First Published: 2nd November 2009, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. Christopher Perrins, Oxford University Press (2009) The Encyclopedia Of Birds [Accessed at: 02 Nov 2009]
2. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 02 Nov 2009]
3. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 02 Nov 2009]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 02 Nov 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 02 Nov 2009]

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