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Dhole

African Dhole (Cuon alpinus)Dhole (Asian Red Dog)A Dhole sleeping at the Toronto ZooA Dhole (also known as the Asiatic Wild Dog, Indian Wild Dog or Red Dog) at Toronto ZooDholes in the Periyar National Park, Kerala, IndiaDhole (Cuon alpinus)
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Dhole Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Carnivora
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Canidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Cuon
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Cuon Alpinus
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Carnivore
Size (L):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
75cm - 110cm (29in - 43in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
12kg - 20kg (26lbs - 44lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
72.4km/h (45mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
10 - 13 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Pack
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Endangered
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Grey, Black, White, Brown, Tan, Gold, Red
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Fur
Favourite Food:Deer
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Dry forest and thick jungle
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
8
Main Prey:Deer, Rodents, Birds
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Tigers, Leopards, Humans
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Bushy tail and distinctive calls

Dhole Location

Map of Dhole Locations
Map of Asia

Dhole

The dhole (also known as the Asiatic Wild Dog, Indian Wild Dog and the Red Dog) is an endangered wild dog native to the jungles of Asia. Although the dhole is very similar in appearance to the African Wild dog and the Bush dog, the dhole is the only member of it's genus.

Historically, the dhole was found though East and Southern Asia, from the Russian far east right down to Sumatra, and although today the range of the dhole has been significantly reduced, the dhole inhabits a wide variety of habitats including thick, deciduous woodlands to jungles and tropical rainforests.

There are three different species of dhole that are very similar in characteristics and only really differ in location and fur colour. Although a dominant predator within their environment, the dhole populations have been heavily affected by disease introduced by domesticated animals such as cats and dogs.

Like other medium-sized canines, the dhole is a highly sociable animal that spends it's life as part of a pack. The dhole is well-known for the vocal calls that it uses to communicate with it's pack. It is said that the repetitive whistles of the dhole are so distinctive that individuals animals can be easily identified by their calls.

The dhole is a carnivorous and fairly dominant predator within it's natural environment, working as part of a pack to try and bring down larger prey to feed the whole group. The majority of the dhole's diet however is made of smaller animals including lizards, frogs and rodents.

Due to the dominant nature of the dhole and the fact that it often has protection from it's pack, there are few animals that are of any threat to the dhole in the wild. Large wild cats such as tigers and leopards are the only natural predators of the dhole, as the biggest threat to the world's dhole populations has been from humans.

After breeding, female dholes give birth to between 5 and 12 pups after a two month long gestation period. Dhole pups grow rapidly and are cared for by both their parents, and by other adult dholes in the pack. The dhole pups begin to hunt when they are a few months old and reach adult size by the time they are about a year and a half old.

Today, the dhole is endangered in the wild as populations have been reduced to less than 2,000 individuals across their native territories. The main reason for the severe decline in the dhole population numbers is thought to be through habitat loss and hunting from humans.

Dhole Translations

български език
Азиатско диво куче
Cesky
Dhoul
Dansk
Dhole
Deutsch
Rothund
English
Dhole
Español
Cuon alpinus
Suomi
Vuorisusi
Français
Dhole
עִבְרִית
דהול
Magyar
Ázsiai vadkutya
Bahasa Indonesia
Ajag
Italiano
Cuon alpinus
日本語
ドール
Bahasa Melayu
Anjing Hutan
Nederlands
Dhole
Norsk
Asiatisk villhund
Polski
Cyjon
Português
Raposa-asiática-dos-montes
Basa Sunda
Ajag
Svenska
Asiatisk vildhund
Türkçe
Asya yaban köpeği
中文

Dhole Comments

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First Published: 12th July 2010, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 12 Jul 2010]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 12 Jul 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 12 Jul 2010]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 12 Jul 2010]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 12 Jul 2010]

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