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Yak

Yak (Bos Grunniens)Yak seen at Markha Valley, Ladakh.Yak (Bos Grunniens)A white yakYak in MongoliaYak (Bos Grunniens)Yak at 4.790 mYak on way to Everest base campYaks in Mongolia
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Yak Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Artiodactyla
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Bovidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Bos
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Bos Grunniens
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Herbivore
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
2-2.2m (6.5-7.2ft)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
300-1,000kg (661-2,200lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
40km/h (25mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
15-20 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Herd
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Threatened
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Brown, Black, White
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Hair
Favourite Food:Grass
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Alpine meadows and open hills
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
1
Main Prey:Grass, Herbs, Mosses
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Bears, Wolves
Special Features:Thick, hairy coat and large horns

Yak Location

Map of Yak Locations
Map of Eurasia

Yak

The yak is a herd animal found in the mountainous regions of central Asia. The yak tend to gather in herds from 10 yaks to 100 yaks, most of which are female. There are only a few male yaks per herd.

Although there is a large domestic population of yak, there are only a few wild yak remaining . The yak is still used in many parts of central Asia, for pulling heavy farm machines and transporting large loads through the mountain passes.

The average male yak can grow to about 2meters tall, with the female yak being about 1/3 the size of the male yak. All yak have very long hair to keep them warm.

The yak belongs to the same cow family as the Asian water buffalo, the African buffalo and the American bison. However, the yak is slightly more like the American bison in appearance as both the yak and the bison have long hair in order to withstand the colder climates, the bison of the North American winters and the yak of the mid-Asian mountains.

The yak breeds in the warmer months of September and after a gestation period of nine months the female yak gives birth to a single yak calf. A female yak will occasionally give birth to twins but it is very rare. Some female yak give birth to a calf almost every year but it depends on the environment in which the yak lives and the yak individual. Yak babies are completely independent by the time that they are a year old and they are fully grown when they are between 7 and 8 years old. The average lifespan of a yak is about 20 years in the wild and slightly longer when in captivity.

Like other species of cow, the yak is a herbivore and spends a great deal of time on grassy plains in the mountains grazing on grasses, herbs and wild flowers. In a similar way to other cow species the yak has more than one stomach which the yak uses to successfully get all of the nutrients out of the plants that it eats.

The yak has firm, dense horns which the yak uses to break through snow in order to get the plants that are buried beneath it and the yak will also use it's horns in defence. They have long shaggy hairthat covers their bodies that keep them warm and dry.

Yak Comments

Dr Von Hassleberg
"VERY USEFUL AND INTRESTING"
manish ale
"it helps me in school project."
cool guy
"It is helping me in school projects so much. It is great "
mama
"thanks ineeded it for school"
Anonymous
"i like yak"
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First Published: 10th November 2008, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]

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