The 10 Most Beautiful Parrots In The World

Written by Hannah Ward
Published: October 14, 2021
Image Credit Jeff Schultes/Shutterstock.com
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There are around 350 species of parrots in the world today and most live in the tropical and subtropical regions of Australia, Africa, and Central and South America.  Parrots have long been kept as pets and are as famous for their exceptionally bright and stunning colors as they are for their talking ability.  Read on to discover the most beautiful parrots in the world and where they’re found.

10. Dusky Lory

Vibrant colors – dusky lories are one of the most beautiful parrots around

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Dusky lories are stunning parrots with brown, orange, and white plumage and an orange beak.  They are native to New Guinea but are also found on the nearby islands of Salawati and Yapen.  Dusky lories have a length of 10 inches and their main habitat is tropical and subtropical lowland and mangrove forests.  They eat a mixture of fruit, seeds, nectar and buds and have a specialized tongue that allows them to feed on nectar.  It has tiny structures like hairs on the end of it that stand on end so that the nectar can be soaked up.  Incredibly, they often travel around 30 miles per day while searching for food.

9. Blue And Gold Macaw

Largest Parrots - Blue and Yellow Macaw
A stunning blue and gold macaw flying

One of the most popular species of parrot is the blue and gold macaw.  Blue and gold macaws are easily recognizable by their brilliant blue upper bodies and tail feathers. They also have yellow lower bodies and legs and a green forehead.  Blue and gold macaws are native to Central and South America and live in forests and woodlands.  They bond for life and, although they are usually seen in large flocks, the bonded pairs stick close together.  Blue and gold macaws have an inquisitive nature and are known for being able to mimic humans extremely well.

8. Hyacinth Macaw

Largest Parrots - Hyacinth Macaw
Hyacinth macaws are the longest parrots in the world

The longest parrot in the world is the hyacinth macaw with a length of 3 feet 3 inches.  Hyacinth macaws have rich royal blue plumage with vibrant yellow eye rings and chin and a long pointed tail.  They are found in southern Brazil and western Bolivia and prefer palm swamps and open woodland habitats, although they usually avoid dense and humid forest regions.  Unfortunately, hyacinth macaws are classed as a vulnerable species due to habitat loss and captures for the pet trade.  Hyacinth macaws are known for having a calm temperament and are often called the gentle giants of the parrot world.

7. Grand Eclectus

Grand Eclectus parrots
Male and female grand eclectus parrots look completely different

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The grand eclectus is native to Australia, the Solomon Islands, Sumba, New Guinea, and the Maluku Islands where they favor tropical rainforests.  They are particularly unusual as the male and female are completely different colors, and for a long time it was thought that they were two different species.  Males are bright green with red under their wings and on the sides of their bodies, while females are mostly a rich red with purple across their back, abdomen, and underside of their wings.  Grand eclectus parrots make their nests in hollows in large trees.  Females remain in the nest for around 11 months of the year and fiercely defend it against other parrots, although they rarely leave the nest and rely on the male to bring them food.

6. Scarlet Macaw

Scarlet Macaw flying through the forest.
Scarlet Macaws are one of the most beautiful parrots

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Native to Central and South America, the scarlet macaw is a stunning bird and a popular pet.  They prefer humid evergreen forests and are the national bird of Honduras.  Scarlet macaws are large parrots with red, yellow, and blue plumage.  They are around 32 inches long but more than half of their length is made up of their long tail.  Scarlet macaws use incredibly loud squawks and screeches to communicate.  These calls are intended to carry over a distance of several miles to their groups.  Scarlet macaws mate for life and can be extremely aggressive during the breeding season.

5. Green-Winged Macaw

Green-Winged Macaw
The second largest species of parrot – green winged macaws

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Green-winged macaws can be easily recognized by their appearance.  They are mostly red across their head and body, and have vibrant green and blue wings and tail feathers.  Green-winged macaws are the second largest species of parrot, with a length of around 37 inches.  They are widespread throughout South America and prefer tropical rainforests and savannahs.  Green-winged macaws lay three eggs which take 28 days to hatch and the young parrots are fully fledged after 100 days.  These parrots also have an incredibly long lifespan and often live for up to 80 years.

4. Blue-Fronted Amazon

Turquoise Fronted Amazon parrots
Turquoise Fronted Amazon parrots

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Also known as turquoise-fronted Amazon’s, these parrots are found across Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay.  Blue-fronted Amazon’s get their name from the light blue feathers on their foreheads, although the rest of their bodies are green and they have yellow around their eyes.  Blue-fronted Amazon’s prefer tropical and subtropical forests where they nest in tree cavities.  Females lay between three and five eggs and chicks leave the nest approximately 60 days after hatching.  Blue-fronted Amazon’s are particularly noisy birds and are known for screeching loudly, although they do have some talking ability.

3. Sun Conure

Three beautiful parakeets, Sun Conures, sitting on a tree branch.
Sun Conures are one of the brightest parrots around

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As one of the most vibrant colored parrots around, sun conures can easily be recognized by their stunning yellow-orange bodies and green wings and tails.  Sun conures are native to small regions of South America and are found predominantly in north Brazil, southern Guyana, southern Suriname, and southern French Guiana where they prefer a tropical habitat.  These parrots are extremely social and are often seen in large flocks of up to 30 birds.  Sun conures usually remain with their flock at all times and are very fast flyers.  They often cover many miles in a day while searching for food and are extremely vocal when they are flying.  Unfortunately, they are an endangered species due to habitat loss and many of them having been captured for the pet trade.

2. Crimson Rosella

Crimson Rosella parrot
One of the most beautiful parrots around is the crimson rosella

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Crimson rosellas are native to Australia and are an introduced species in New Zealand and Norfolk Island.  They are medium-sized parrots and have extremely long tails.  Crimson rosellas have striking red bodies with purple-blue wings and tail feathers.  They are mainly found in coastal and mountain forests and woodlands where they usually prefer wetter forest areas.  Although crimson rosellas roost on some of the highest tree branches during the night they forage in trees, bushes, and on the ground during the day.  Crimson rosellas nest in hollows in tree trunks and for the first six days of their lives only the female feeds the chicks. However, after the first week both parents share the feeding duties.  Crimson rosellas have a few predators – such as peregrine falcons, goshawks, and owls – but they are not considered to be under threat.

1. Rainbow Lorikeet

Lorikeet close-up
Rainbow lorikeets have stunning plumage

Easily one of the most beautiful parrots in the world is the rainbow lorikeet.  With their stunning green, orange, and blue feathers it is easy to see where they get their name.  Rainbow lorikeets are native to Australia and are an introduced species in Tasmania, New Zealand, and Hong Kong where they live in rainforests and coastal woodlands.  They usually live and travel in pairs and fiercely defend their nesting and feeding areas against all other birds.  Rainbow lorikeets nest in hollows in eucalyptus and palm trees and only the female incubates the eggs.

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About the Author

I'm an avid animal lover, and when not writing I can be found on my farm surrounded by dogs, horses, and sheep.