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Bonobo

Bonobo at Cincinnati ZooYoung Bonobo (Pan paniscus)Bonobo (Pan paniscus) at Cincinnati ZooA Bonobo (Pan paniscus)Bonobo at Cincinnati ZooYoung Bonobo (Pan paniscus)Head of a Bonobo (Pan paniscus)Bonobo at Cincinnati ZooBonbobo mom and baby (Pan paniscus) at Cincinnati Zoo
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Bonobo Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Primates
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Hominidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Pan
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Pan Paniscus
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size (H):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
73cm - 90cm (29in - 35in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
25kg - 50kg (55lbs - 110lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
40km/h (25mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
30 - 40 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Troop
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Endangered
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Black, Grey, Brown
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Hair
Favourite Food:Fruit
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Lowland jungle and swamp forests
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
1
Main Prey:Fruit, Leaves, Seeds, Insects
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Large Primates, Crocodiles
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Large body size and opposable thumbs

Bonobo Location

Map of Bonobo Locations
Map of Africa

Bonobo

The bonobo is a large species of primate that is only found in the Democratic Republic Of The Congo in central Africa. The bonobo is also known as the pygmy chimpanzee and the dwarf chimpanzee as the bonobo is thought to be very closely related to the chimpanzee and the two species share very similar characteristics.

The bonobo is thought to have evolved from the ancestors of the common chimpanzee millions of years ago when the Congo River was formed. Today, the bonobo lives south of the Congo river and chimpanzees live north of the river meaning that they have evolved as two separate species.

Along with the chimpanzee, the bonobo is believed to be one of the closet living relatives of the human. The bonobo shares 97% of the same DNA that makes up humans and the bonobo displays very similar behaviour to humans as far as social interaction and reproduction are concerned. Along with a number of other primate species (including humans) the bonobo has opposable thumbs which allow it to grip onto food and trees.

The bonobo is smaller than the chimpanzee with adult bonobos averaging around 70cm in height and weight roughly 40kg, The bonobo has black hair covering its body that is parted on its head, pink lips and long legs. Generally, the body of the bonobo is not as hairy as the body of their chimp cousins.

The bonobo is an omnivorous animal mainly feeding on vegetation such as fruits, leaves, flowers, bark and seeds. The bonobo also eats honey, eggs, insects and even small mammals and reptiles. The bonobo has also been known to turn to cannibalism (eats other bonobos) in captivity but it is unknown whether or not this happens in the wild.

Due to its large size and the ability of the bonobo to escape into trees, the bonobo has few natural predators in the African forests. The main predators of the bonobo are humans who hunt the bonobo for its meat and the odd crocodile when the bonobo gets close to the water. It is thought that other large primates may prey on the bonobo in the wild but that will often be down to disagreements over territory that turn nasty.

As with many other species of large primate, the bonobo spends a great deal of time on the ground looking for food and resting with the bonobo troop. Bonobos are also known to climb into the trees if they feel threatened or are search of culinary delicacies such as honey.

Bonobos inhabit areas of the forest in troops which usually contain the alpha male bonobo, a number of females bonobos and their offspring. The bonobo troop feed together and warn off unwelcome animals along with social interacting through calls and grooming.

Female bonobos breed roughly once every few of years and there has been not specific breeding season observed. After a gestation period of around 8 months, the female bonobo gives birth a single bonobo baby. The bonobo baby is nursed and cared for by the mother bonobo until it is between 3 and 6 years old. The male bonobo babies are known to be more dependent on their mothers and the female bonobo babies are more independent at a younger age. A female bonobo can expect have between 5 and 7 babies in her 40 years lifespan.

Today, the bonobo is considered to be endangered animal with only 10,000 bonobo individuals thought to be left in the wild. The bonobo populations have declined dramatically due to hunting an habitat loss. The civil unrest in the region has also made the bonobo populations more vulnerable.

Bonobo Translations

Català
Bonobo
Dansk
Bonobo
Deutsch
Zwergschimpanse, Bonobo
English
Bonobo
Español
Bonobo
Suomi
Bonobo
Français
Bonobo
עִבְרִית
שימפנזה ננסי
Hrvatski
Bonobo
Italiano
Bonobo
Limburgs
Bonobo
Nederlands
Bonobo
日本語
ボノボ
Polski
Szympans karłowaty
Português
Bonobo
Svenska
Bonobo
Türkçe
Bonobo

Bonobo Comments

adrian
"love these animals wish there not going ext inked"
adrian
"love these animals wish there not going ext inked"
Anonymous
"nice animal wish it wouldnt be extint"
THX
"helped me with project"
Austin Williams
"Bonobos live in an egalitarian society. There are alpha females, but an absence of alpha males. The females determine the rank of their sons. This is because bonobos have no estrus cycle and a plentiful abundance of food, making more time for social activities. While they have a ranking system, it is not as significant as it is in other primate societies. There are zero accounts of aggression from scientists studying bonobos in the wild. Make love, not war!"
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First Published: 30th September 2009, Last Updated: 16th February 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 30 Sep 2009]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 30 Sep 2009]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 30 Sep 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 30 Sep 2009]

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