Animals >>

Flying Squirrel

Flying Squirrel (Pteromyini)Flying Squirrel (Pteromyini)Flying Squirrel (Pteromyini)Flying Squirrel (Pteromyini)Flying Squirrel (Pteromyini)Flying Squirrel (Pteromyini)
[Jump to Article]

Flying Squirrel Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Rodentia
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Sciuridae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Pteromyini
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Pteromyini
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size (H):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
20cm - 30cm (8in - 12in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
56g - 175g (2oz - 6oz)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
24km/h (15mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
5 - 8 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Black, Brown, Grey, White, Tan
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Fur
Favourite Food:Nuts
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Forest and woodland
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
4
Main Prey:Nuts, Berries, Eggs
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Cats. Coyote, Raccoon
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Small body size and furry glide membrane

Flying Squirrel Location

Map of Flying Squirrel Locations

Flying Squirrel

The flying squirrel is a medium-sized rodent, closely related to the squirrels found in woodlands and across grasslands around the world. Flying squirrels tend to be slightly larger in size than the common squirrel.

Despite the name, flying squirrels cannot actually fly, although they can be airborne for a remarkable length of time. Instead of flying, flying squirrels move through the air by gliding (normally between the trees), with the longest recorded glide of a flying squirrel being nearly 90 meters.

Flying squirrels have a furry, stretchy membrane that stretches between their front and back legs. When the flying squirrel needs to get away quickly, it opens it's arms and legs out and uses the membrane like a parachute. Flying squirrels also have large eyes, and stubby flattened tails.

There are nearly 50 different species of flying squirrel found in forests around the world. Flying squirrels range in size and colour depending on the species of flying squirrel. The largest species of flying squirrel is the Woolly flying squirrel, which is found in Pakistan and the smallest flying squirrel species is the pygmy flying squirrel, found in the jungles of Borneo and Malaysia.

Flying squirrels are omnivorous animals meaning that their diet is based on both plant and animal matter. The flying squirrel is a nocturnal animal, so it forages for food under the cover of night as flying squirrels are not able to easily escape the birds of prey that hunt during the day. Flying squirrels eat nuts, seeds, fruits, berries, insects and bird eggs.

Due to their small size, flying squirrels have numerous natural predators wherever they live in the world. Domestic cats, raccoons, snakes, birds of prey, foxes dogs and coyotes are all primary predators of the flying squirrel.

Flying squirrels are known to breed twice a year, in the early spring and again in the summer. After a gestation period of roughly 40 days, the female flying squirrel gives birth to between 2 and 7 baby flying squirrels, which are blind and naked when they are born. The baby flying squirrels develop fur and open their eyes when they are about a month old. The young flying squirrels begin to glide and forage with their mother when they are roughly 2 months old.

Flying Squirrel Translations

Català
Esquirol volador
Deutsch
Gleithörnchen
English
Flying squirrel
Esperanto
Flugsciuro
Español
Pteromyini
Français
Pteromyinae
Magyar
Repülő mókusok
日本語
モモンガ
Nederlands
Vliegende eekhoorns
Polski
Polatuchy
Português
Esquilo-voador
Svenska
Flygekorrar
中文
鼯鼠

Flying Squirrel Comments

Levi
"This helped me a lot on my work"
Levi
"It's a bird, it's a plane, it's a, flying squirrel?"
Emily
"This helps me helps with my homework "
char char
"this help me on my flying power point"
nicolas
"Squirrels can fly now"
Showing 5 of 33 comments.
Show More Comments

Post Comment

Please enter a nickname which you can use to identify your comment, but which others can not use to identify you. Please do not use your online usernames/handles which you use for social networking.

Article Tools

Add to Phobia Filter
Update your Flying Squirrel phobia filter.
Print Article
View printer friendly version of Flying Squirrel article.
Source/Reference Article
Learn how you can use or cite the Flying Squirrel article in your website content, school work and other projects.

First Published: 22nd October 2009, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 22 Oct 2009]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 22 Oct 2009]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 22 Oct 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 22 Oct 2009]

Are you Safe?

Are you Safe? is an online safety campaign by A-Z-Animals.com. If something has upset you, the Are you Safe? campaign can help you to speak to someone who can help you.

Are you Safe?
Subscribe to A-Z Animals and enjoy our website without advertising! Subscribe Now